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COLLEGE flEWS 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



Volume V-/. Annville, Pa., Tuesday, September 16, 1913 JSlo. I 



Entered as second-class matter November 12, 1910, at the post office at Annville, Pa., under the act of March 3, 1879. 



4 



\ 



Lebanon Valley Opens 48th Year With Bright 
Prospects and the Largest Student Body in History 



JUDGE KEEDY 

DELIVERS ADDRESS 



On Wednesday morning, the first 
chapel service of the school year was 
held at eleven o'clock. The devotion- 
al services were conducted hy the 
Rev. B. F. Daugherty, D. D., of Leb- 
anon, after which the student body 
and many visitors present were ad- 
dressed by the Hon. Martin Luther 
Keedy, judge of the fourth judicial 
district of Maryland. The subject of 
his address was "Work" He said 
that, the only true road to success 
was that of good, hard, honest work, 
and making the most of the oppor- 
tunities offered. The address was 
one of the most helpful and best giv- 
en to the students for some time, 
and was very much appreciated by 
all present. 

At the conclusion of the address, 
President Gossard announced that 
the gymnasium for which the stu- 
dents have been hoping for so many 
years would be completed, and ready 
for use in a . few weeks. The new 
athletic director and coach Mr. Guy- 
er, also made an address in which 
he outlined the work for the year, 
and announced that as soon as the 
gymnasium was completed there 
would be compulsory gymnasium 
work for all students, both men and 
women. 

The student attendance in chapel 
was the largest in years. ( The col- 
lege and academy students nearly 
filling the chapel. The new fresh- 
man class is very large this year 
numbering between fifty and sixty 
members, — and there are manv new 
members to the other three classes, 
as well as to the academy. Not for 
manv years has there been such a 
hrieht outlook for the year in all 
\\ n ** and it is to be honed that this 
will be one of Lebanon Vallev's best 
vears. 



FOOTBALL OUTLOOK 



CHANGES IN 



Mr. Alfred K. Mills, '04, has just 
returned to Annville from Dayton, 
Ohio. Mr. Mills was visiting his sis- 
ter, Mrs. A. R. Clippinger. 



Coach Guyer Has His Men 
Working 

Before going into details concern- 
ing the prospects of the coming foot- 
ball season, we deem it fitting to in- 
troduce to the student body and 
friends of the school, Mr. Roy S. 
Guyer, our new physical director. 

Mr. Guyer, a seasoned athlete, and a 
graduate from the Spring-field Training 
School, has taken his place as head 
coach in football with every one's 
wishes for the best of success. Al- 
though our coach is new to many 
he is known by the greater number 
of older alumni. Earlier in his 
career he attended Lebanon Valley, 
played football with the varsity and 
later coached a year. That season 
has always been considered one of 
signal success and the ability of 
"Rags" was shown. Thus with the 
eo-operation of everyone guaranteed, 
we know that Mr. Guyer will head a 
most fortunate career for Lebanon 
Valley in athletics. 

The schedule before our varsity 
this year is one of the hardest put 
before L. V. teams for many years. 
All games are collegiate and the ma- 
jority are played on strange grounds. 
The two open dates will in all proba- 
bility turn out to be the best draw- 
ing card of the season, as negotia- 
tions with Albright have been carried 
on for the completion of the sched- 
ule. 

The material this year seems ex- 
ceptionally fine, promising a most 
successful team. Nine old varsity 
men are on, will be back in shape, 
while an abundance of new men are 
on the field. Ex-Capt. Lerew, our 

last year,s starring quarter-back will 
Continued on page 2 



THE FACULTY 



The college faculty this year is 
practically the same as last year. A 
new physical director has been se- 
cured in the person of Mr. Guyer, and 

Miss Ora Bachman has been added to. 
the conservatory staff. Prof. Peters, 
our teacher in education and phi- 
losophy, resigned his chair to become 
superintendent of the Royersford 
school. No person has been secured 
to fill his place. 

Short accounts of the new profes- 
sors appear below. 

MR. ROY J. GUYER 

Professor Roy J. Guyer, our ath- 
'letic coach and physical director, is 
a man interested in Lebanon Valley 
because he sees her possibilities and 
because of bis relation to her. Mr. 
Guyer took his Baccalaureate de- 
gree at Lebanon Valley in 1908. 
While here at school he was a great 
athlete and student so in the fall of 
1908 he returned to his Alma Mater 
to coach her athletic teams, and take 
charge of the library. The next 
school year Mr. Guyer taught in Leb- 
anon High School and coached the 
football team. That was the most 
successful season that Lebanon Val- 
ley has had for some years, due both 
to the training by the coach, and the 
hard work by the men. 

In the summer of 1910 our coach 
took a course in physical training at 
Lake Geneva, Wisconsin, and from 
there went to Martialtown, Iowa, as 
physical director of the Y. M. C. A. 
at that place. While there Mr. Guy- 
er became interested in Y. M. C. A. 

Continued cn page 3 



COLLEGE NEWS 



College flecus 



Issued weekly during - the College 
Year by the Students of Lebanon 
Valley College 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

R. M. WEIDLER '14 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

florence mentz '15 
John b. lyter '14 

Social 

EST A WAREHEIM '16 

Athl-etics 

PHILO STATTON '15 

Alumni 

PAUL STRICICTjER '14 

Music 

G. F. BOTTS '14 

BUSINESS MANAGER 

HARRY CHARLTON '14 

Subscription Price $1.00 per year 
Single Copies 5 cts. 
Clubs of ten, 75 cts. 

Address all business communications 

tO HARRY CHARLTON '14 all Other 

matter to Room 22, Administra- 
tion Building Lebanon Valley Col- 
ege, Annville, Pa. 



EDITORIAL. 

Lebanon Valley College opened for 
her forty-eighth time on last Wed- 
nesday amid songs and cheers and 
hearty applause. Never before in 
her history has her opening day 
augered such success, and never be- 
fore has such a large student body 
presented itself for admission. We 
feel confident now that we are go- 
ing forward, so at this time the 
"News" through its editorial columns 
bids all its new subscribers welcome. 

Now while we are strung to this 
high pitch let us make up our minds 
to do something for the college that 
has done much for us. Let us re- 
solve to be at least a small contribu- 
tor to her in her onward march. 

iEvery thing has been put in readi- 
ness for us so all we must do is go 
forward. The unfinished tasks of 
last year have been finished or clear- 
ed away by others so all we must do 
is push on. 

We have in some measure proven 
our worth for the Alumni believed 

in us, and loved us enough to present 
us with that long planned and hoped 
for gymnasium. The Executive board 
have entrusted to us the care of sev- 
eral finely finished buildings, and 

the Faculty have tried to make our 
school work easy even at the sac- 
rifice of time and rest to themselves. 
We should respond in the way we 



have been responded to. Let us keep 
that spirit of loyalty, for that is the 
happiest way to live, and the easiest 
way to keep ourselves interested in 
school work. Let us play the opti- 
mist in every cause, for by so doing 
we will lay stones in the foundations 
of all our activities that will with- 
stand storm and stress and harbor 
us safely. 



FOOTBALL OUTLOOK 



Continued from page 1 

b3 in uniform by Sept 22. Suavely, an- 
other "L" man, who played such a 
steady, yet sensational game at end 
will be back with the squad before 
the end of the week. Our most ef- 
ficient line-plunger, of season of 
1912, Pell, will join the team on or 
around Oct. 4. 

Aside from these three men all 
players are being whipped into shape 
by efficient coaching and steady 
training. 

Capt. Strickler is again in the 
game at half-back and is proving 
daily that his best season is coming 
with the playing of this year's sched- 
ule. DeHuff, back from his summer 
training at Ocean City, Md., is rap- 
idly getting into shape to use his 
ability as a hard-playing tackle. 
Evans, an end, with Vonbergy, Stat- 
ton and Mickey are in their places 
with the squad working harder than 
ever to get into condition for the 
season. 

Many new men have entered the 
ranks at Lebanon Valley, causing the 
prospective for the fall to brighter 
considerably. Wheelock, a former 
Carlisle star and running mate of 
James Thorpe, will hold down one of 
the half-back positions. It is certain 
that he will score many points for 
the team, for he is an exceptionally 
fine open field runner and an adept 
in the use of the straight arm. 

Donahue, a Shamokin H. S. man, 
is showing up well on the field and 
is making a strong fight for an end 
or half-back position. 

Bachman, from Annville H. S.; 

Loomis, Harrisburg T. S., and Hol- 
linger, from Kutztown Normal 
School, are showing excellent form 
and will develop into first class line- 
men. 

Brown, a Pottstown H. S. man, 
will strengthen the line as he is an 
experienced tackle and has plenty of 
weight and speed. Among the oth- 
er promising men are Fink, Brenne- 

iran, Echelberger, Schmidt, Craybill 
Rupp, Williams, Wagner, Engle, Hu- 
ber, Schenberger and Light. 



CHANGES IN THE FACULTY 

Continued from page 1 

physical work and in order to fit 
Training School, Springfield, Massa- 
himself thoroughly for that field he 
entered the Springfield Y. M. C. A. 
chusetts, in the fall of 1911. 

At Springfield Mr. Guyer proved 
his ability, for during his senior year 
there he taught the college phy- 
siology, the hardest course in the col- 
lege, played on the varsity football 
team, and was appointed assistant 
baseball coach for the spring of 1913. 
During both of the summers at 
Springfield Mr. Guyer was Play- 
ground Director for the city, and in 
that field he had wonderful success. 

Our prospect in athletics are un- 
limited now, for under such a case 
our boys will work and something 
will be accomplished. 

MISS ORA BELLE BACHMAN. 

With the opening of the Fall term 
Miss Ora Belle Bachman, an alumnus 
of L. V, C. Conservatory of Music, 
was selected for a position on - the 
faculty of her Alma Mater. 

Miss Bachman graduated in piano- 
forte with the class of 1911. She 
was successful in bringing under her 
instruction a class of music pupils in 
her home town and at the same time 
continued her study of the pipe or- 
gan, completing that course with the 
class of 1913. 

As organist of the college church 
and prominent in the musical life of 
the college community, Miss Bach- 
man has made for herself a position 
which clearly justified her appoint- 
ment as instructor in Pianoforte, 
Ear Training, Sight Playing and 
Hand Culture. 

A new studio is being furnished for 
her in Room 3, Conservatory build- 
ing. We are pleased to note that her 
pupils from town have matriculated 
to continue their study with her in 
the Conservatory. The News joins 
with her many friends in wishing 
her the success that her efforts de- 
serve. 



Y, M. C. A. 

The first regular Y. M. C. A. meet- 
ing was held on Sunday afternoon in 
the Y. M. C. A. hall. President Rus- 
sell Weidler had charge and deliv- 
ered a short talk on "Profitable or 
Unprofitable Profits." In his talk he 
outlined the work to some extent for 
the year and showed what great 
things could be accomplished if 
everybody would help. 

The challenge for the year was 
given by Dr. J. E. Lehman and we 
believe it will be met. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



SOCIETY PR.OGRAMS 

PHILOKOSMIAN 

Review of the Week, 

S. Huber Heintzelman 

Our New Co-eds H. L. Olewiler 

Debate — 

Shall the U. S. intervene In Mexico? 
Affirmative Negative 
Jokn N. Ness J. M. Leister 
L. B. Harnish John D. Jones 

Vocal Solo L. A. Rodes 

The Pleasures of a Freshman, 

Clyde A. Lynch 
Living Thoughts Editor 

CLIONIAN 

Piano Solo Blanche Black 

Paper, "Outlook of the Suffrage 
Movement in Pennsylvania," 

Blanche Risser 

Reading Josephine Urich 

Book Review < # . .Vera Myers 

Vocal Solo Edith Gingrich 

Our Profs Esther Heintzelman 

Olive Branch Editor 

KALOZETEAN 

Current Events Geo. Hallman 

Song Society 

Essay Faber Stengle 

Vocal Solo . .Marcelle Von Bergehy 

Sketch Harry Charlton 

Edgar Landis 
Examiner Editor 

Y. W. C. A. 

Owing to the illness of the presi- 
dent of the Y. W. C. A. and the ab- 
sence of the vice-president, the first 
meeting of the season was conducted 
by the treasurer, Miss Belle Orris. 
Miss Orris welcomed the new girls 
in behalf of the association, and out- 
lined the purpose of the association. 
She emphasized the fact that the Y. 
W. C. A. aims to develop not only 
the spiritual side of a girl's nature 
but the mental and social side as 
well. The service was interesting, 
helpful, and well attended. Twenty- 
four girls were present. May this be 
the best year in the history of the 
association thus far. 

The daily prayer circle which is 
held under the auspices of the Y. W. 
C. A. met for the first time this year 
at 9 o'clock Sunday night. Fifteen 
girls were present. We are hoping 
that these prayer circle meetings 
will be well attended throughout the 
year and that each girl may derive 
much good from them. 



SUNDAY SONG SERVICE. 

The first Sunday song service was 
held after supper on Sunday evening. 
The attendance was large and the 
singing spirited. We consider this a 
fine way to spend a little time each 
week. 




Alumni 



GO TO IT BOYS 



Rev. B. F. Daugherty, '89, of Leb- 
anon, assisted at the opening chapel 
exercises of the college. 

Rev. Joseph Daugherty, '89, of 
Columbia, visited school last week. 

Miss Ora Harnish, '06, superin- 
tendent of The Burd School of Phila- 
delphia, visited school on Tuesday 
and matriculated one of her former 
pupils here at school. 

Prof. O. P. Butterwick, '12, of Her- 
shey, was here last Wednesday visit- 
ing among the students. 

Prof. E. Knauss, '07, for the past 
three years professor of German at 
the Middletown High School, was 
elected professor of Modern Lan- 
guages in the Technical High School 
of Harrisburg. 

Prof. M. 0. Billow, '08, has been 
elected to the chair of Mathematics 
in the Waynesboro High School. 

F. A. Rutherford, '10, a senior in 
the Medical Department of the Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania, brought his 
brother to school and matriculated 
him as a freshman, and helped arouse 
enthusiasm among the fellows. 

Floyd E. Shaffer, '10, a senior in 
the Medical Department of Johns 
Hopkins University, spent last Tues- 
day looking over the football ma- 
terial. Mr. Shaffer was a former 
captain of the football team. 

Prof. V. D. Mulhollen, '13, of Leb- 
anon, was at school for a few hours 
on Saturday. 

Rev. O. T. Ehrhart, '11, of Leba- 
non, was at school several days last 
week. 

Prof Max F. Lehman, '09 left last 
week to take up his work in Balti- 
more. Prof. Lehman has been suf- 
fering for some days with a sprained 
hip. 



MISS MENTZ'S OPERATION 



Her condition is as erood as can be 
expected. — Operation Successful. 

Miss Florence C. Mentz, associate 
editor of the College News, was op- 
erated on for an abscessing appen- 
dicitis on Saturday night. Miss 
Mentz fell sick a week before, but 
the cause of her sickness was not de- 
finitely determined until Saturday. 
Reports from the hospital say she 
is resting well and her condition is 
as well as can be expected. 

While at school her class sisters 
acted as her nurses, but special cred- 
it is due Miss Mary Irwin who by 



ITS 



Russ Brothers 
Velvet Ice Cream 



AT 



USSY'S" 



A. S. MILLER, W. Main St. 

jCebanon 2/attei/ 
Coileffe 

First Class Faculty. 
Group System. 

Special Facilities in Chemistry 

and Biology 
Music, Art, Oratory 

Ladies in the Hall are under the con- 
stant care of the Preceptress. 

Write for catalogue 
ttev. S. D. Sossardj ^President 



WINDSOR HOTEL 

W. T. BRUBAKER, Manager. 
European, $1.00 per day and up 
American, $2-50 per day and up 




Midway between Broad Street 
Station and Reading Terminal 
on Filbert Street. 

The only moderate priced hotel of 
reputation and consequence in 

PHILADELPHIA 



COLLEGE NEWS 



hen skillful work won special com- 
mendation from the attending phy- 
sician. 

The "News" hopes that she may 
soon return to school and to her 
place on the staff. 

Mrs. Mentz of York, mother of 
Miss Florence came to her daugh- 
ter's bed side on Saturday shortly 
before the operation. 





Items of Interest 



Mr. and Mrs. Ed. Bishop, of Bal- 
timore; Mr. Clarence Plitt, of Leba- 
non, and Mrs. Max. Plitt, of Balti- 
more, were visitors at the home of 
the President on Sunday. Mrs. 

D. B. SHIFFER 
GRADUATE OPTICIAN 

Eyes Examined, Glasses Fitted, Broken 
Lenses Replaced, anything in 
the Optical line 

East Main St ANNVILLE 



You get only the best at 

COLLAM'S 

Quantity ✓ ✓ / Quality 
Main Street 




Standard Quality 

There is no quicksand more un' 
stable than poverty in quality and 
we avoid this quicksand by standard 
quality, 

Tennis, Golf, Base Bali, Cricket, Feci Ball. 
Basket Ball, Athletic Equipment. 
Catalogue Free. 

A. G, SPALDING L BROS, 

j6 ^30 Nassau St, 25 W. 42d St., NEW YORK 

journal Publishing Co. 

Printers 



Main Street 



Annville, Pa. 



panied her daughter to school and 
visited for a day. 

Mrs. Huber, of Lemasted, accom- 

Mrs. Taylor, of Jersey shore, 
brought her daughter to school. 

Miss Myers, of Altoona, was here 
for the opening of school. 

Rev. C. G. White, '12, of Refton, 
visited the school last week. 

Mrs. Diverson, of York, was here 
for the opening of school. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hurtzler, of Man- 
heim, spent a day at the college last 
week. 

Mr. and Mrs. R. H,. Brane, of 
Westerville, Ohio, stopped at the edi- 
tor's office for a few hours on Sat- 
urday. They expressed themselves 
favorably about the college in all its 
departments. 

Professor C. R. Daugherty, '97, 
and his wife were here for the open- 
ing of school. Professor Daugherty 
is principal of The Albert Academy, 
Freetown, West Africa, and is now 
on his furlough. He also preached 
in the United Brethren church on 
Sunday morning. 

Professor S. R. Oldham, '08, a 
former professor at Bates College, 
Lewistown, Maine, spent a day at 
the college last week. He is on his 
way to Montana, where he intends 
to take out a government claim. 

Rev. h Moyer Hershey, '03, Sec- 
retary of the Hershey Y. M. C. A., 
was here for the opening of school. 
He has just completed a very popular 
and successful Summer Chautauqua 
which was held under the auspices 
of his christian association. 

Mr. G. H. Moyer, of Pinegrove, 
brought his grandson to school and 
spent some time looking over the 
plant. He remarked that he was 
well pleased with the school. 

Mrs. K. F. Mathras, of Highspire, 
was here for the opening of school. 
She is visiting her daughter, Joseph- 
ine, and Professor and Mrs. Shroyer. 

Rev. A. N. Horn and Rev. J. F. 
Snyder, both of Red Lion, were here 
for the opening of school. 

Mr. Wynd, of Hagerstown, Md., 
brought his daughter to school last 
week. 

Mrs. Rosman, of Sinking Springs, 
visited her sister last week. 

Mr. Heilman, a former student 
here and one of the star athletes at 
the University of Pennsylvania, vis- 
ited friends at the college on Friday. 

Mr. Samuel Groh, ex-'15, and now 
a student at the University of Penn- 
sylvania, visited friends on Friday. 

President Gossard made business 
trips to Chambersburg and Reading 
last week. 



You are correct if you get your 

LADIES' and GENTS' 
FURNISHINGS 

At KINPORTS', Annville, Pa. 

Students' Discount Packard & Radcliffe Shoes 

W, D. ELLIOTT 
Shoemaker 

Repairing neately done. Rubber work a 
specialty, 

Patronage Solicited 
Main St, Annville, Pa. 

LIVERY 

First Class Teams to 
Hire 
Parties a Specialty 

H. F\ LONG & SON 
Rear Eagle Hotel Annville, F»a 

WM. WALTZ 
Hair Cutting and Shaving 
Saloon 



W. Main St. 



Annville, Pa 



For Cakes and Confectionery 

GO TO 

Bowman's Bakery 

A FULL SUPPLY OF HALL'S CHOCO^ 
LATES. ALWAYS FRESH 

W, Main St, Annville, Pa, 

Home-Made Noodles, Peanut Butter 

H. B. FLOWERS 

Manufacturer of 

''Flower Brand" Potato 
Chips 

LEBANON, PA. 

RAH! RAH! BOYS EAT 

Raw Oysters at "Ussy's" 

OR EAT 'EM STEWED OR FRIED JUST AS 
YOU REFER 

A. 8. MILLER W. MAIN ST. 

A RULE 

' Put this down as a rule," says Dr. Bardeen 
"tliat the teacher who rails against Teachers 
Agencies either has been refused admission to 
membership or has tried to evade the payment 
of a. just debt." 

During twenty-seven years of earnest, intelli- 
gent, aggressive experience with teachers, we 
have found others— the applicants who do not 
know how to utilize the services of an Agency 
and who resent suggestions. 

We devote about one-fourth the time and en- 
ergy of our organization to preparing these ap- 
plicants and lose annually hundreds of vacancies 
through their persistent inefficiency. Our work 
along this line will be continued as hopefully 
and as good natu redly as heretofore; for we rind 
t hat most of our good, strong applicants were at 
one time inexperienced in securing positiens. 

Every year since 1905 we have been in need of 
more applicants to 1111 the best positions in near- 
ly every grade of public and private school work. 

THE TEACHERS' AGENCY 

R. L. MYERS & CO., 
Lcmoync Trust Bldg., Harrisburg, Pa Co 
operating agencies if) Denver and Atlanta: 



COIiliEGE f*EWS 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



Volums \t[f. flnnville, Pa., Tuesday, September 23, 1913 Jio. 2 

Entered as second-class matter November 12, 1910, at the post office at Annville, Pa., under the act of March 3. 1879. 



RECEPTION FOR 
JEW STUDENTS 

The Y. W. C. A. and Y. M. C. A. 
gave their annual students' reception 
to the new students on Saturday 
night in the Ladies' Parlors. As 
each person entered he was given a 
card which read as follows: 
Students' Reception 
1913 
My Name is 
Mr. Blank 
What Is Yours? 
By means of these cards persons 
introduced themselves to those pres- 
ent. 

After nearly everyone had met 
nearly everyone else Mr. Lester 
Rodes, chairman of the social com- 
mittee of the Y. M. C. A., welcomed 
all the new students in hehalf of the 
associations, and then introduced 
with appropriate words the college 
idol, our beloved President, Dr. G. 
D. Gossard. 

Dr. Gossard extended a hearty wel- 
come to both the old and the new 
students. He said that we are here 
for business, to prepare for life. Col- 
lege is a good place to develop the 
mental, religious, and physical sides 
o f . the students. He asked the ques- 
tion, "What do you expect to be 10 
years from now?" What you are 
10 years from now depends upon 
what you do today. He brought out 
the fact that if we would make the 
most of life it means hard study, de- 
termination, and courage. He told 
the story of an Irishman who thought 
h^ should like to go to war. He en- 
listed. Then one day the time for 
fighting came. The Irishman was so 
badly frightened that he ran away 
and hid until after the skirmish. 
When his comrades asked him why 
he ran, he said, "I'd rather be a 
coward for five minutes than to be 
dead for the rest of me life." We 
need courage to win. We must al- 
so work and work hard. 

After Dr. Gossard's address the 
students sang college songs. Then 
ice cream, cakes, and punch were 
served. Just before we separated for 
the night each class gave its yell. 
Then the college yell was given for 
Dr. Gossard. The attendance was 
large and everyone seemed to have 
had a pleasant evening. 



LEBANON VALLEY'S 
HIED DIN G BELLS 

YOUNG-MILLER 
Rev. David E. Young, pastor of 
our church at Jonestown, Pennsyl- 
vania, was married to Miss Anna W. 
Miller, of Manheim, Pennsylvania, 
on Monday evening, September 8, at 
eight o'clock, by Rev. Dr. J. A. 
Lyter, of Harrisburg, in the United 
Brethren church at Jonestown, in 
the presence of a large assemblage 
of friends. The bride was beauti- 
fully gowned in white messaline, 
with full veil, and carried a bouquet 
of bride's roses. She was unattend- 
ed. After the ceremony a wedding 
luncheon was served to the bridal 
party and a few friends at the home 
of Mr. Elmer Tobias, after which 
Mr. and Mrs. Young left for their 
newly-furnished home at Annville, 
Pennsylvania, where both will take 
work in the college (The Religious 
Telescope) . 

CARL-YINGST 
Mr. William C. Carl, of Tower 
City, a former member of the class 
of 1915, and Miss Margie Yingst, of 
Annville, were married last March, 
the wedding was kept a secret for 
some months but came to be known 
during the summer. They are now 
at housekeeping in Philadelphia, 
where Mr. Carl is in business. 

BRUNNER McKEE 
Prof. W. Albert Brunner, '11, a 
teacher in the High School at York, 
Pennsylvania, and Miss Mary Mc- 
Kee, of Wayne, Pennsylvania, were 
married June 25th, by Rev. S. Edwin 
Rupp, of Harrisburg. 

BEAR-LONG ENECKER 
Prof. Grover Bear, '10, a teacher 
in the Lewistown High School and 
Miss Longenecker, of Palmyra, 
were married last June. 

The "News" wishes them a long 
and happy married life. 

DAY IS XI MM KHM A X 
Miss Mary Zimmerman, conserva- 
tory '02, and Mr. Geo. H. Davis, of 
New York, were married August 
sixth. They live in New York City, 
where Mr. Davis is connected with 
the Deaf and Dumb Institute. Miss 
Zimmerman is the daughter of Dr. 
and Mrs. Zimmerman, of Annville. 



TEAM WORKS RARD 
FOR FIRST GAME 

During the last week the football 
squad has by continuous practice, 
rounded into fairly good shape for 
the opening game with the Carlisle 
Indian School on Wednesday. The 
wealth of new material makes every 
man optimistic concerning the sea- 
sons' outcome. Every night nearly 
thirty candidates are on the 
field, working on Varsity or scrub 
line-up, and each one trying to make 
good. It is evident that there will 
be no "jobs cinched" in the early fall 
and held for the season on account 
of a scarcity of men for the places. 
Two sets of backfield men will be in 
evidence this year, and nearly two 
sets of linemen, for the Varsity 
squad. In the opinion of many it 
is felt that with Strickler, Wheelock, 
Pell and Lerew working behind the 
line, Lebanon Valley's offensive work 
will be superior to any in years. 

Coal-mining, boiler-making, farm- 
ing, etc., were occupations which, 
during the summer, tended to hard- 
en various members of the squad and 
put them into shape for a hard sea- 
son of football. 

During the week severe scrim- 
mages have been held every evening 
and always has there been the old 
"pep" in all the work. Saturday 
last, a game took place between the 
Varsity and a team composed of 
Alumni Varsity men. The contest 
was a mere practice to whip the fel- 
lows in shape for the Indian game. 
It served its purpose. 

Students, see the fellows off to Car- 
lisle next Wednesday morning send- 
:* them away with the feeling that, 
win or lose, you are back of them, 
cheering them on. 

1913 SCHEDULE, FOOTBALL. 

Sept. 24 — Carlisle Indian School 
at Carlisle. 

Oct. 4 — Bucknell at Lewisburg. 

Oct. 11 — Millersville Normal 
School at Annville. 

Oct. 18 — Open. 

Oct. 25 — Washington College at 
Chestertown, Md. 

Nov. 1 — Muhlenberg at Allentown. 
Nov. 8 — Dickinson at Carlisle. 
Nov. 15 — Open. 

Nov. 22 — A. I. S. second team at 
Annville. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



College fieous 



Issued weekly during - the College 
Year by the Students of Lebanon 
Valley College 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

R. M. WEIDLER '14 

/ASSOCIATE EDITORS 
florence mentz '15 
John b. lyter '14 

Social 

EST A WAREHEIM '10 

Athletics 
PHILO STATTON '15 

Alumni 
PAUL STRICKLER '14 

Music 

G. P. BOTTS '14 
BUSINESS MANAGER 

HARRY CHARLTON '14 

Subscription Price $1.00 per year 

Single Copies 5 els. 
Clubs of ten, 75 els. 

Address all business communications 

to HARRY CHARLTON '14 all Other 

matter to Room 22, Adminis.ra 
tion Building Lebanon Valley Col 
•ege, Annville, Pa. 



EDITORIAL. 

In many years, the outlook for a 
good year has not been so bright as- 
it is this year. There are many more- 
students here than there have been 
for a long time. The buildings have 
been repaired and are in the best of 
condition, and in all things there have 
been great improvements. 

Now we all owe duties to our 
Alma Mater which cannot be over- 
looked. Loyalty to the school by the 
student body is one of its best as- 
sets. If the student body stands as 
a unit in support of the college in 
its various activities, there can be 
: only one end and that is success. 
In our class work we should do our 
toest, so that even the high standard 
which our college maintains may be 
raised still higher. The time given 
to athletics is as important as that 
given to our other work. Since we 
have our new athletic director and 
.gymnasium, every student should go 
in tor some form of athletics. Not 
-only is it necessary to develop the 
mind in a college, but the body as 
well, for without a good, well de- 
veloped body, a well trained mind is 
sadly handicapped. We may not all 
be able to make the varsity teams, 
but we who cannot, can at least give 
them practice, and at the same time 
keep the body sound and in good 
■condition to receive our mental train- 
ing in the class rooms. 

Another duty we owe our college 
is that of trying to keep our excellent 
buildings and campus in the fine con- 



dition which they now are. It is un- 
necessary to drive countless numbers 
of tacks and nails into the walls, 
making large and unsightly holes 
when several will suffice. Water 
should not be thrown about the 
halls; it is unnecessary to carry mud 
into the buildings when there are 
good, serviceable doormats placed at 
each door; paper and litter of other 
kinds should not be thrown on the 
campus or into the halls. By being 
careful in all of these things and in 
many others, we can keep our build- 
ings and campus in the best of con- 
dition. 

Our athletic field is large and has 
many possibilities for being made 
better. It has always been the duty 
of the freshmen to keep it in good 
condition. Many times it has not 
been as good as it might have been, 
when a little work would have made 
it excellent. Let us hope that this 
will not be the case this year. If 
the freshmen class were to i.aKe a 
special pride in the athletic field 
and under the direction of the vari- 
ous managers make it their duty to 
keep it in good condition, would it 
not be a great deal pleasanter for 
all concerned. Remember a fine, 
well-cared for athletic field is some- 
thing which all visiting teams re- 
member and speak of when they go 
to other schools, and the advertise- 
ment derived from good, clean ath- 
letics is by no means the least that 
a college can have. 

Let everybody then take a long 
pull and a pull together, not only in 
the college work, in athletics, in the 
social functions, but in all of these 
activities, and try to make Lebanon 
Valley College a model college. We 
all owe our duties to her; let us all 
try to bear them honorably and well. 



Y. M. C. A. 

The Christian Association meeting 
on Sunday was one of spirit and 
helpfulness. Mr. Lester Rodes con- 
ducted the service and spoke in a 
helpful manner on "Sticking to Old 
Principles." Following his talk sev- 
eral of the members made remarks 
and a few of the new men pledged 
themselves to the principles of the 
Y. M. C. A. 

We are glad for the interest mani- 
fested in these meetings, especially 
among the new fellows, and we trust 
that we can keep the interest at its 
present high spirit. 



MISS MENTZ 'S CONDITION. 

Miss Mentz, who was operated on 
last Saturday a week ago, is now 
convalescent. She is still very weak 
but now that she is allowed to take 
solid food she is gaining rapidly. 
She is very cheerful at all times and 
appreciates visits from her friends. 

The "News" is glad to make this 
favorable report in reply to the in- 
quiries received from subscribers. 



1913'S WHEREABOUTS. 

All the members of the 1913 class, 
that wished them, have secured re- 
sponsible and lucrative positions. 

The "News" congratulates the 
members of the class, and takes 
pleasure in publishing accounts con- 
cerning them. 

Mr. E. Kephart Boughter is pro- 
fessor of science in the Rugby School 
for Boys, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Miss Florence E. Christeson is 
teaching in the High School at High- 
spire, Pa. 

Miss Florence E. Clippinger is 
teaching science in the Annville 
High School. 

Miss Clara K. Horn is teaching in 
the High School at Red Lion. 

Mr. Landis R. Klinger has charge 
of the science department in the Bes- 
semer High School, Bessimer, Michi- 
gan. 

Miss Edith M. Lehman is teaching 
English in the Royersford High 
School. Royersford, Pa. 

Mr. J. F. Leininger is teaching in 
the High School at Chambersburg, 
Pa. 

Mr. Boaz G. Light is principal of 
the Hebron schools, Lebanon, Pa. 

Mr. Victor D. Mulhollen is head of 
the science department of the Leba- 
non High School. 

Miss Elizabeth H. Rechard is 
teaching in the York High School. 

Mr. Ivan L. Ressler is in business 
with his father at Shamokin, Pa. 

Mr. G-. Adolphus Richie is secre- 
tary to Dr. D. J. Burell of the Marble 
Collegiate church, New York City. 

Mr. P. F. Roberts is preaching in 
the North Illinois conference. 

Mr. John E. Sherk is instructor 
in mathematics in the Greenville 
High School, Greenville, Pa. 

Miss Lottie Spessard is an instruc- 
tor in the Southern Industrial Insti- 
tue at Charlotte, N. C. 

Mr. Harry E. Ulrich is pastor of 
the Chamber Hill United Brethren 
church located near Harrisburg, Pa. 

Mr. Charles Y. Ulrich is living at 
his home in Manheim. 

Mr. Mark H. Wert is pastor of the 
Pleasant Hill church of Lebanon. 

Mr. George A. Williams is an in- 
structor in the science department 
of the Iowa State University at Aims, 
Iowa. 

Miss Edna Yarkers is principal of 
the High School at McAlisterville, 
Pa. 

Miss Sara E. Zimmerman is teach- 
ing English in the High School at 
Hallstead, Pa. 



Miss Johnson, Dean of Women, 
gave out rules for the governing of 
the Ladies' Dormitory last week. The 
list is composed of thirteen "Thou 
shalt nots." 



COLLEGE 



NEWS 



PHILOKOSMIAN. 

Original Story. . . .Gideon L. Blouch 
Paper, Importance of Compulsory 
Gymnasium work in a College 
Education . . D. Ellis Zimmerman 
Debate, Resolved, That a Glee Club 
is a better advertisement than a 
football team. 

Affirmative Negative 
P. Statton C. Snavely 

R. Stickel G. DeHuff 

Quartette, 

Rodes, Reddick, Ness and Bow- 
man. 

Mayor Gaynor David Evans 

"I Should Worry". .Harold W. Risser 

CLIONIAN. 

(1) Piano Solo Mae Meyer 

( 2 ) Essay Myra Kiracof e 

(3) Reading Elta Weaver 

(4) Our College Town And the 

Country Surrouning It, 

La Rene Engle 

(5) Solo Edith Gingrich 

(6) Pantomime, 

Viola Gruber, Esther Moyer 

(7) Chorus Society 

KALOZETEAN. 

Current Events Geo. Hallman 

Paper Chas. H. Arndt 

Song Society 

Debate — Resolved, That the im- 
peachment of Governor Sulzer 
was unjust. 
Affirmative, 

D. M. Long, D. E. Young 

Negative, 

John Lyter, Verling Jamison 
Dutch Dialogue, 

Phares Gibble, V. M. Heffelfinger 
Visitors welcome. 



Notice ! 

The Pennsylvania Arbitration and 
Peace Society is offering one hun- 
dred dollars in prizes to be contest- 
ed for in an annual oratorical con- 
test. Any undergraduate student in 
Lebanon Valley College is eligible to 
write and submit an oration, on 
some phase of the peace question, to 
the Society before the first of March, 
the six being judged of highest mer- 
it from all those submitted to be de- 
livered at some convenient place in 
final public competition. Orations 
should be no more than fifteen hun- 
dred words in length. 

The Society will be glad to sup- 
ply the college library with ma- 
terial on the subject. 

Persons wishing to enter can re- 
ceive additional information by ap- 
plying at the News office. 



THE COLLEGE BOOK STORE. 

During the summer the College 
Book Store has been renovated and 
now is in fine condition. The store 
has been enlarged, new glass floor 
show cases, and a large cabinet of 
drawers have been added, and the 
stock increased very much. The pro- 
prietors, Harnish & Smith, are mem- 
bers of the senior class. 



Clothing Called for 
and Returned 



ALUMNI. 

Rev. G. Mahlon Miller, '99, has re- 
signed as pastor of the United Breth- 
ren at Johnstown to become pastor 
of a Congregational church in St. 
Paul, Minnesota. 

Rev. P. M. Holderman, '11, visited 
friends and relatives at the college 
last week. 

Mr. G. A. Richie, '13, of New 
York City, visited his friends at the 
college last week. 

Mr. Rodger B. Saylor, '11, for the 
past two years head of the science 
department in the Lebanon High 
School, has been elected to an as- 
sis tints-hip on the Physics Depart- 
ment of Columbia University. Mr. 
Saylor left on Friday to take up his 
new work. 

Mr. Forrest S. Hensel, '12, of 
Lykens, a member of the firm of T. 
A. Hensel and Co., spent Sunday at 
the college with friends. 

Prof. Boaz G. Light, '13, of Heb- 
ron, attended the reception of Sat- 
urday night. 

Prof. H. Clay Deaner, '79, Instruc- 
tor in Latin for several years in the 
college, and now chief clerk in the 
Annville National Bank, is spending 
his vacation in and around Keedys- 
ville, Maryland, visiting friends and 
relatives. Prof. Deaner is a great 
friend to the college and he will 
speak for it in his native state. 

The "News" wishes him a very 
pleasant vacation. 

William O. Ellis, '11, has been 
elected to the position of assistant 
state etymologist of the state of 
Washington. 

Francis R. Kennedy, '11, has ac- 
cepted a position as Y. M. C. A. sec- 
retary in a city in the state of Ken- 
tucky, having resigned a similar po- 
sition in the state of Tennessee. 

John F. Lehman, '11, connected 
with the Penna. Steel Works of 
Steelton, returned home over the 
week-end to play full-back on the 
Alumni team against the varsity. 

Vote for J. P. Batdorf, *99, for Prothonotary Main Street 



David B. Bashore 

Patronize the 

Academy Tailot* 



Academy Bldg. 
Room 18 



D.-B. SHIFFER 
GRADUATE OPTICIAN 

Eyes Examined, Glasses Fitted, Broken 
Lenses Replaced, anything in 
the Optical line 

East Main St ANNVILLE 



You get only the best at 

COLLAM'S 

Quantity ✓ o * Quality 
Main Street 




Standard Quality 

There is no quicksand more on" 
stable than poverty in quality and 
we avoid this quicksand by standard 
quality. 

Tennis, Golf, Base Ball, Cricket, Foot Ball, 
Basket Ball, Athletic Equipment. 
Catalogue Free. 

A. G. SPALDING L BROS, 

6'30 Nassau S«. 25 W. 42d St.. NEW YORK 

M.F. Batdorf sSon 

Ladies' and Gents' 
Furnishings 

Annvill? 



CALENDAR. 

Tuesday, Sept. 23, p. m. — Prayer 
meeting. 

Wednesday, Sept. 24 — Lebanon 
Valley vs. Indians, Carlisle. 

Friday, Sept. 26, 7 p. m. — Socie- 
ties. 

Sunday, Sept. 28, 1 p. m. — Chris- 
tian Associations. 5.30 p. m., song 
service. 



JOS. MILLER 

FURNITURE 
and UNDERTAKING 

W est Main Street Annville, Pa. 



JACOB SHHSENT 



Y. W. C. A. 

Miss Larene Engle, vice-president 
of the association, led the service on 
Sunday. She took as her topic, 
"What are you living for?" She 
dwelt especially upon Christ's work 
and our relation to it'. The attend- 
ance was good. 



MERCHANT 
TAILOR _ 

READY-TO WEAR CLOTHING 
Main Street Annville 

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 

% SCHOOL of VV 
ENGINEERING 

CIVIL, MECHANICAL, ELECTRICAL and CHEMICAL 
ENGINEERING, and GENERAL SCIENCE 

Send for a Catalogue. TROY, N«Y. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



GO TO IT BOYS 



ITS 



Russ Brothers 
Velvet Ice Cream 



AT 



USSY'S" 



A. S. MILLER, W. Main St. 

eh an on Q/ai/ej/ 
Co/lege 

First Class Faculty. 
Group System. 

Special Facilities in Chemisfry 

and Biology 
Music, Art, Oratory 

Ladies in the Hall are under the con- 
stant care of the Preceptress. 

IV rite for catalogue 
ttev. S. 2? Sossard, ZPrss/tient 



WINDSOR HOTEL 

W. T. BRUBAKER, Manager. 
European, $1.90 per day and up 
American, 92-50 per day and up 




Midway between Broad Street 
Station and Reading Terminal 
on Filbert Street. 

The only moderate priced hotel of 
reputation and consequence in 

PHILADELPHIA 



ITEMS OF INTEREST 

Mr. Warren H. Hayes, a former 
member of the class of 1914, visited 
friends here last week. Mr. Hayes 
graduated at Otterbein University, 
Westerville, Ohio, last June and was 
on his way to Princeton Seminary, 
where he will take work. 

A large number of students went 
to Lebanon on Wednesday night to 
see "Within The Law." 

Mr. George F. Botts, of Elizabeth- 
town, a former member of the News 
staff, gave a song recital in his home 
town. He was assisted by Miss Hel- 
en Brightbill, '12, of the oratory de- 
partment, as reader. 

The recital was a great success 
and served as a fine advertisement 
for the college. 

Miss L. Hartzler, a student in the 
Conservatory, spent Sunday at her 
home in Manheim. 

Mr. Carl G. Snavely, '15, was elect- 
ed to serve as a student member 
on the Athletic board of the college. 
This board is composed of two mem- 
bers of the faculty, two members of 
the alumni association and three 
members of the student body. 

Two new tennis courts are being 
put in shape for the use of the stu- 
dents. The work is being done by 
the freshmen under the supervision 
of Coach Guyer. 

Dr. Gossard assisted at the dedi- 
catory services of Bethany United 
Brethren church, Lebanon, on Sun- 
day. 

Treasurer Weaver preached at the 
re-opening service at Union Deposit, 
and helped raise money for the im- 
provements. 

Prof. A. E. Shroyer preached at 
Harrisburg State Street church on 
Sunday. 

Mr. Robert Gossard and wife, of 
Pittsburgh, spent several days with 
Dr. and Mrs. Gossard. 

Last Wednesday night the Sopho- 
mores put up their posters. The 
posters were very original. Poster 
scraps were indulged in both be- 
fore and after chapel. 

Miss Helen Brightbill, a former 
member of the class of 1915, left on 
Thursday morning for Poughkeepsie, 
N. Y.. where she will enter Vassar 
college. 



DO YOU ENJOY CHORUS SINGING? 

Become one of the "charter" mem- 
bers in the "Lebanon Valley College 
Choral Society." 

Requirements — Sing true to pitch. 
Attend rehearsals once each week. 
Pay a fee of $1.00 each for Fall and 
Spring seasons toward running ex- 
penses. Agree to be responsible for 
the sale of 2 reserved seats for the 
December and May concerts. Own a 
copy of the music to be used. 

Apply to the Musical Director of 
the Conservatory at your earliest 
convenience. 



You are correct if you get your 

LADIES' and CENTS' 
FURNISHINGS 

At KINPORTS', Annville, Pa. 

Students' Discount Packard & Fadcliife Shoes 

W. D. ELLIOTT 
Shoemaker 

Repairing neately done. Fubfeer work a 
specialty. 

Patronage Solicited 
Main St, Annville, Pa. 

LIVERY 

First Class Teams to 
Hire 
Parties a Specialty 

H. F\ LONG & SON 
Rear Eagle Hotel Annville, 1 * 

WM. WALTZ 
Hair Cutting and Shaving 



Saloon 



W. Main St. 



Annville, Pa 



For Cakes and Confectionery 

GO TO 

Bowman's Bakery 

A FULL SUPPLY OF HALL'S CHOCO- 
LATES. ALWAYS FPESH 

W, Main St. Annville, Pa. 

Home-Made Noodles, Peanut Butter 

H. B. FLOWERS 

Manufacturer of 

' Flower Brand" Potato 
Chips 

LEBANON. PA. 

RAH! RAH! BOYS EAT 



Raw Oysters at "Ussy's" 

OR EAT EM STEWED OR FRIED JUST AS 
YOU REFER 

A. S. MILLER W. MAIN ST. 



A RULE 



' Put this down as a rule," says Dr. Bardeen 
"that the teacher who rails against Teachers 
Agencies either has been refused admission to 
membership or lias tried to evade the payment) 
of a just debt." 

During twenty-seven years of earnest, intelli- 
gent, aggressive experience with teachers, we 
have found others — the applicants who do not 
know how to utilize the services of an Agency 
and who resent suggestions. 

We devote about one-fourth the time and en- 
ergj of our organization to preparing these ap- 
plicants and lose annually hundreds of vacancies 
through their persistent inefficiency. Our work 
along this line will be continued as hopefully 
and as good naturedly as heretofore; for we find 
that most of our good, strong applicants were at 
one time inexperienced in securing positirns. 

Every year since 1905 we have been in need of« 
more applicants to fill the best positions in near- 
ly every grade of public and private school work 

THE TEACHERS' AGENCY 

R. L MYEFS & CO., 
Lemcync Trust Bldg., Harrisburg, Pa Cc^ 
operating agencies in Denver aod Atlanta: 



H M Bender 



9-14 



COIiliEGE KEWS 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



Volums V/f flnnville, Pa., Tuesday, September 30, 1913 



Ho. 3 



Entered as second-class matter November 12, 1910, at the post office at Annville, Pa., under the act of March 3, 1879. 



LEBANON VALLEY 





Playing against a team which out- 
weighed and always before outclass- 
ed it, the eleven of Lebanon Val- 
ley held the Indians to the moderate 
score of 26-0. These twenty-six 
points were the result of four touch- 
downs and two goals. The score 
made this year is a record one, inas- 
much as it is the lowest ever result- 
ing from a L. V. vs. Carlisle Indian 
School game. Many years ago the 
final count on the Carlisle gridiron 
was brought down to the thirties and 
for a while that stood. However, 
when Coach Guyer was leading the 
L, V.'s squad in 1904, the proteges 
of Warner ran twenty-eight points 
and made the students, at Lebanon 
Valley happy in allowing such a low 
count. On Wednesday last, the In- 
dian Varsity, the team that plays 
Harvard, the Army, and Penn, and 
runs away with the pig skin quite 
frequently, succeeded in scoring only 
26 points against our team. 

During the first quarter our fel- 
lows showed really how they could 
play. Both teams were rresh and 
ready to work to the best of their 
ability. Carlisle kicked to L. V. The 
kick was a long one and ended be- 
hind the goal we were defending, 
-where Strickler fell on it. The cap- 
tain decided to scrimmage on the 
twenty yard line, and there the ball 
was first put in play. It was "nip 
and tuck" for about eight minutes, 
L. V. holding the Indians for down 
and then after futile attempts to gain 
the required ten yards were forced 
to punt back into the enemy's terri- 
tory. Finally, Guyon on straight 
line plunging carried the ball over 
the goal line for the only touchdown 
of the first quarter. We received the 
kick off once again and this time 
carried the pig skin to our thirty 
yard line. The quarter ended soon 
and the referee transferred the ball 
to the opposite end of the field. 

The second period was the time of 
our ill luck. Men, in the first stages 
of training, were beginning to feel 
the lack of wind and the abund- 
ance of bruises. Guyon, the big fast 
half-back of the Red skins, possess- 
ing himself of the desire to become 
acquainted with the goal posts more 



intimately, accordingly pushed over 
the final line for a total of twenty 
points during this second ten min- 
utes. Two of these touchdowns were 
"flukes," but, nevertheless, counted 
Our fellows fought gamely, but could 
not withstand the onslaught of their 
opponents for this period. 

The second half saw Lebanon Val- 
ley in a somewhat refreshed condi- 
tion and with spirit enough to wipe 
the teammates of Welsh off the field. 
The Indians came back with prac- 
tically the same line-up, in truth, 
four substitutions were made, and 
were in high hopes of rolling up a 
record score. Our team soon showed 
ed that every inch of ground was 
to be fought for, and that "Hukes" 
were not in season. For twenty min- 
utes the two elevens battled fiercely 
up and down the field, with no re- 
sult. In the fourth quarter, Wheelock 
was placed at full-back and Pell 
transferred to end. Wheelock was 
in. the better condition and could 
help the backfield materially in 
their line plunges. "Chief" surely 
did cover himself with glory when 
he drove through the line for more 
than one first down, and it is to his 
work particularly that, when the 
timekeepers' whistle blew for the 
final time, the ball rested in the 
middle of the field and working to- 
ward the Indians' goal. 

C. Snavely continually outpunted 
Welsh and to this fact may be attri- 
buted our ability in keeping the In- 
dians far from our goal. 

Capt. Strickler played a great 
game at half-back, and it is consid- 
ered hard luck that "Polly" did not 
keep free from injury. During the 
first part of the game Strickler's foot 
was injured which caused him much 
pain. In spite of his lameness, the 
captain stayed in the game and 
played his hardest. His end runs 
gained continually and his running 
back of Welsh's punts was a feature. 
Everybody felt like shaking Polly's* 
hand for sticking with his team- 
mates and seeing the game to a 
finish. 

Considering the superior training 
of the Carlisle school and the longer 
Continued on page 2 



On Thursday evening the Sopho- 
mores went to supper as usual. Af- 
ter supper they strolled off by twos 
and threes as if they were going 
for the usual evening walk. This 
was not the case, however, for they 
had arranged for a hike to the Water 
Works. As it grew dark the class 
assembled on the road just beyond 
the cemetery. At about 7.15 they 
started with their chaperon, Miss 
Seltzer, for their destination. At 
first they were a little cautious lest 
s suspicious Freshmen should be 
hiding by the way; but as they went 
on they gained confidence, and be- 
gan to enjoy the beauty of the lovely 
evening and the pleasure of con- 
genial companionship. 

At eight o'clock they reached the 
hotel where they were to spend the 
evening. Two other members of the 
class joined them there. They en- 
joyed themselves by playing games, 
and singing songs until about 9.30> 
when dinner was served. The menu 
included fried chicken, cold slaw,, 
peas, asparagus, corn, mashed pota- 
toes, celery, sliced peaches and cake. 
Everyone enjoyed the good food and 
the splendid sociability at the meal. 
A number of toasts were given, then 
the party prepared to leave. Before 
leaving they gave a number of class 
yells. 

It was about 10.30 when they left 
for Annville. For the return trip 
they selected a different route from 
the one over which they had come. 
The night was a perfect one for such 
a hike, and everyone enjoyed it thor- 
oughly. At 11.30 the party reach- • 
ed the campus, they were tired but 
happy, for they had not seen a Fresh- 
man since supper. 

The guests of honor were Miss 
Lucy Seltzer, and Mr. "Jo" Whee- 
lock. Mr. Echelberger showed a 
great deal of class spirit by walk- 
ing the whole distance on his 
crutches. 

When the Sophomore girls return- 
ed to the dormitory, they learned 
that the Freshmen girls had been 
very badly frightened for fear the 
Sophomores would attack, them when 
Cor.ti;,i.ed on pa#e 4 



COLLEGE NEWS 



College fiecus 



Issued weekly during- the College 
Year by the Students of Lebanon 
Valley College 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

R. M. WEIDLER '14 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 
florknce mentz '15 
John b. lyter '14 
Social 

ESTA WAREHEIM '16 
Athletics 

PITILO STATTON '15 

A I u iiuii 

PAUL, STRICKLER '14 

Music 
{ .. F. BOTTS '14 

BUSINESS MANAGER 

HARRY CHARLTON '14 

Subscription Price $1.00 per year 
Single Copies j els. 
Clubs of ten, 75 els. 

Address all business communications 
to harry charlton '14 all other- 
matter to Room 22, Adminisira- 
tion Building Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege, Annville, Pa. 



HELP THE NEWS. 

The COLLEGE NEWS has started 
•on her sixth volume, and every 
number that is issued records a 
page of college history. Her life 
thus far has been one of greatness 
and dignity, and she will continue 
to move on in that noble manner, 
for that is her purpose. Editorial 
staffs in the past have given their 
best to her, and the present staff is 
trying, in its own peculiar way, to 
hold aloft that magnificent banner 
of selfsacrifice. Many plans for the 
'betterment of the paper have burst 
like bubbles because they could be 
no more than plans, and all of her 
plan makers have turned away dis- 
couraged when they looked at her 
printed sheets, because she did not 
show in any degree the hours of time 
and thought put upon her. 

This "News" staff like former 
staffs have had plans to fail and have 
become discouraged when the ma- 
chinery did not work well, but never- 
theless they are going on. They 
believe they see that the paper has 
& mission and a field of activity, 
so they are going to make some sug- 
gestions for her future. 

The staff is composed of a few- 
students, who like the rest of college 
students have things to do, who are 
supposed to gather and write all 
the news of the week, slighting none, 
and giving all its proper recogni- 
tion. They are supposed to arrange 
the news, manufacture some when 
there is none, and lengthen out a 
little mole article into a mountain 
story, all for her subscribers' criti- 
cism. They are to be prompt no 
matter what is in the way, for it is 



their business to have the sheet out 
on time. 

We believe in a greater Lebanon 
Valley, and therefore we believe in 
a greater College News. Now to get 
this greater news we must ask for 
some assisstance. Could not each 
student as he or she hears some im- 
portant item write it down and 
hand it to the editor; would it be 
too much of a task for students to re- 
port their visitors rather than have 
a staff member hunt around in an 
awkward way for the particulars? 
We think that there is enough good 
news around this institution to fill 
the paper, so why allow the manage- 
ment to fill up with subscription 
blanks? 

We make this an open letter to 
alumni. We at school cannot learn 
of all your great achievements, for 
Lebanon Valley has alumni half way 
around the world; so direct a card 
to the "News" telling of your where- 
abouts, and we will be pleased to 
publish it. Then, too, offer sugges- 
tions. We, the staff, make no preten- 
sions at first grade journalism, and 
though we do our best, suggestion 
would often add variety to the paper. 
Some hvae given us suggestions and 
we have tried to follow them out as 
well as we could, but we will be glad 
for other hints. 

So friends, alumni and students 
lend aid to your publication, for we 
are here to better it with your help. 



FOOT BALL 



Continued from page 1 

and harder practices, Lebanon Val- 
ley cannot help but feel proud of 
the fellows who played with such 
"stick-toitiveness" and held the score 
such a low figure. Below is what we 
feel proud of: 

Indians. Lebanon Val. 
Wallette L E C. Snavely 

(Velsie) 

Wellamus L. T DeHuff 

(Gillman) (E. Snavely) 

Hill L. G Charlton 

( Brown) 

Garlon C Von Berghy 

Bresch R. G Mickey 

( Hollinger) 

Look-around .. R. T Statton 

(Hodge) 

Veternack R. E Wheelock 

(Pell) 

Welsh Q. B Strickler 

Lamie R. H. B Lerew 

Guyon L. H. B Donahue 

(Braklin) 

Calae P. B Pell 

(Crane) (Wheelock) 
Touchdowns: Gayon, 4. Goal 
from touchdown: Guyon, 2. Ref- 
eree: Smith. Umpire: Harris. 
Time of quarters: 10 minutes. 

PENBROOK. 

In order that the team might keep 
in condition as well as work out 
new offensive attacks, Manager 



Snavely secured a game with the 
football team of the Penbrook Agri- 
cultural College for Saturday last. 
The team sent to Annville was com- 
posed of old football stars, who, al- 
though not in very good training 
and not having had much practice, 
were prepared to give a hard con- 
test. The game proved excellent in 
one particular; it showed many in- 
dividual weaknesses, which should 
be corrected. Coach Guyer watched 
each man and tried, with his assist- 
ants, to figure out what things were 
lacking, and where improvement was 
needed. Our head coach had his 
men in the best of condition for 
the Indian game, as may be seen by 
the showing they made, and it is 
his idea to keep them in such shape. 
The first two periods of the game 
were very poorly played, in fact, it 
was the poorest football seen around 
this school for years. 

The game opened with Penbrook 
kicking to L. V. The first play con- 
sisted of a forward pass to Snavely, 
which by its length enabled him to 
run unassisted to the goal for a 
touchdown. After the first six 
points the eleven seemed to think 
the game cinched and did not ex- 
ert themselves to any great extent. 
The result was that a "fluke" which 
should never have happened, en- 
abled Penbrook to score a touchdown; 
the goal was then kicked success- 
fully. Thus our over-confidenced, 
and our loose playing proved a means 
for a score at the end of the first half 
of 7-6 against us. 

However, in the second half, the 
fellows got together and began to 
hit the Penbrook line for repeated 
gains. Line plunges, end runs, and 
forward passes were pulled off in the 
old way. Plenty of "pep" was char- 
acteristic of each man, and his main 
thought was to make way for an- 
other touchdown. At the end of the 
second half the score stood 27-7 in 
our favor, which was somewhat bet- 
ter than that of the end of the first 
half. 

The scrimmage proved excellent 
for fitting the team better to meet 
Bucknell, Saturday, Oct. 4. The 
team is going to Lewisburg, confi- 
dent of doing its best to win the 
"pig skin." Plenty of scrimmage 
and good training should put it in 
shape to realize its hopes. Lineup: 

Penbrook. L. V. 

Huber L. E. Snavely 

(Shearer) 

Shearer L. T DeHuff 

(Atticks) 

Reilly L. G Mickey 

(Sellers) 

Cook C . . . Von Bergehy 

(Gumpher) 

Farling R. G Brown 

( Wen rick) 
E. Garman . . . . R. T Statton 

(Huber) 

Aungst R. E E. Snavely 

Packer Q. B Lerew 

Houverter . . .R. H. B Wheelock 



COLLEGE NEWS 



Mcllhentiy . . . L. H. B Donahue 

(Evans) 

L. Garman F. B Pell 

Touchdown: Snavely, Pell, Whee- 
lock, Lerew. Goals from touchdowns: 
Snavely, 3. Referee: Schaeffer. 
Umpire — Butterwick. Timekeeper: 
Warner. Time of quarters: 10 min- 
utes. 



SOCIETY PROGRAMS 



KALOZETEAN PROGRAM. 

Historical Events of October. 

Oct. 7, 1780, Battle of King's Moun- 
tain H. E. Snavely 

Oct. 8-11, 1871, Great Chicago Fire, 
Frank Van Schaak 

Song Society 

Oct. 12, 1492, Discovery of Ameri- 
ca J. A. Walter 

Oct. 17, 1777, Burgoyne's Surrender 
at Saratoga W. E. Mickey 

Vocal Solo Mason Long 

Oct. 19, 1781, Cornwallis' Surrender 
at Yorktown John Long 

Examiner .Editor 

PHILOKOSMIAN. 

The Past Week. . . .Allen B. Engle 

Our Faculty Victor E. Blouch 

Debate, Resolved, That the non-par- 
tisan movement in recent politi- 
cal activities is an assurance of 
cleaner politics. 
Affirmative — Geo. Haverstock, C. E. 

Brenneman. 
Negative — C. H. Ulrich, D. B. Base- 
hore. 

Violin Solo A. B. Engle 

Dormitory Life C. H. Zuse 

Living Thoughts Editor 

CLIONIAN LITERARY SOCIETY 

Current Events Addie Snyder 

Piano Solo Ruth E. Engle 

Debate, Resolved, That the college 

is making good. 
Affirmative — Ruth V. Engle, Mary 

Daugherty. 
Negative — Josephine Urich, Esta 

Wareheim. 

Reading Blancne Kisser 

Vocal Solo Katherine Bachman 

Olive Branch Editor 



MUSIC FACULTY EN TERTAINS 

On Tuesday evening, September 
23d, the Conservatory faculty tender- 
ed an informal reception to the Con- 
servatory students in Engle Hall 
from 8 to 10 o'clock. The students 
first gathered in the chapel where 
they became better acquainted with 
one another, after which the as- 
sembly proceeded to Room 1 of the 
Conservatory where an interesting 
and varied program in which each 
and varied progarm, in which each 
one present took part, was greatly 
tion of the program, punch and re- 
freshments were served. The recep- 
tion was attended by a large number 
of the Conservatory students and up- 
on leaving each one agreed in vot- 
ing the members of the faculty most, 
capable and pleasing hosts 



ALUMNI. 

Mr. C. J. Barr, '82, of Lebanon, 
just returned from a visit to Day- 
ton, Ohio. Mr. Barr was accom- 
panied by his wife, and they report 
having had a very pleasant visit. 

Rev. N. B. S. Thomas, '12, of Big- 
lerville, spent a few days at the col- 
lege last week. 

Mrs. Dr. H. M. Walters, conserva- 
tory, '85, of Manheim, visited Mr. 
and Mrs. Young last Wednesday at 
their home on Sheridan Avenue. 

"Stubby" Wilder, '08, of Lebanon, 
is coaching the Lebanon High School 
football team. Wilder coached L. V. 
C. for several years and always turn- 
ed out a good team and we are sure 
he will do the same for Lebanon 
High. 

Rev. I. E. Runk, '99, for several 
years pastor of Harrisburg First 
church, has been called to the pas- 
torate of the United Brethren 
church at Scottdale, Pa. 

Mrs. Edna Groff Diehl, conserva- 
tory '00, won first prize in a letter 
writing contest held by a concern 
in Harrisburg. The subject for the 
letter was, "My Opinion of the Girls 
of Yesterday and Today." The prizes 
were awarded last week. 



MUSIC. 

All lovers of good piano playing 
should set apart November 11th as 
reserved for the Piano-Lecture Re- 
cital on "Medieval Legends" to be 
given by Sir Edward Baxter Perry 
in Engle Hall under the direction of 
the Conservatory Management. Fur- 
ther notice of same will be announc- 
ed later. 



ITEMS OF INTEREST 

Miss Stella Weitzel, of Sinking 
Springs, has enrolled as a member 
of the Sophomore Class of the Con- 
servatory. 

Mr. G. Frederick Botts, Ex-Con- 
servatory, is engaged in teaching 
piano and conducting a male chorus 
at his home in Elizabethville, Pa. 

Miss Velma Heindel, '13, reports 
a large class of pupils at Red Lion, 
Pa. 

Miss Mary Wyand spent the week- 
end as the guest of Miss Luella 
Hertzler at her home in Manheim, 
Pa. 

Miss Mentz's condition is such that 
she is allowed full diet. We take 
pleasure in announcing such favor- 
able reports, for we all wish for 
her recovery. 

The executive board of the Ath- 
letic Association organized last week 
with the following officers: Presi- 
dent, Prof. A. E. Shroyer; Secretary, 
Carl G. Snavely, '15; Treasurer, Mr. 
VV. H. Weaver. 

The Athletic Association elected 
Mr. Alvin L. Weaver, their leader, 
and Mr. C. E. Brenneman, assistant, 
at a meeting held last week. 

Rev. J. F. Snyder, wife and daugh- 
ter Grace, and Mr. and Mrs. Flinch- 



David B. Bashore 

Patronize the 

Academy Tailor 



Clothing Called for 
and Returned 



Academy Bldg- 
Room 18 



D. B. SHIFFER 
GRADUATE OPTICIAN 

Eyes Examined, Glasses Fitted, Broken 
Lenses Replaced, anything in 
the Optical line 

East Main St ANNVILLE 



You get only the best at 

COLLAM'S 

Quantity ✓ ✓ t Quality 
Main Street 




Standard Quality 

There is no quicksand more urV 
stable than poverty in quality and 
we avoid this quicksand by standard 
quality. 

Tennis, Golf, Base Ball, Cricket, Foot Ball, 
Basket Ball. Athletic Equipment, 
Catalogue Free. 

A. G, SPALDING £ BROS. 

6 -30 Nassau St. 25 W. 42d St., NEW YO.K 

M.F.BatdorfsSon 

Ladies' and Gents' 
Furnishings 



Main Street 



Annvili"; 



JOS. MILLER 

FURNITURE 
and UNDERTAKING 



West Main Street 



Annville, Pa. 



JACOB SARGENT 



MERCHANT 
TAILOR 

READY-TO WEAR CLOTHING 

Main Street Annville 

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 

% SCHOOL of \V 
ENGINEERING 

CIVIL MECHANICAL, ELECTRICAL and CHEMICAL 
ENGINEERING, and GENERAL SCIENCE 

Send lor a Catalogue. TROY, N«T» 



COLLEGE NEWS 



GO TO IT BOYS 



ITS 



Russ Brothers 
Velvet Ice Cream 



AT 



"USSY'S" 

A. S. MILLER, W. Main St. 

jCehanon 7/aiiei/ 
Coilege 

First Class Faculty. 
Group System. 

Special Facilities in Chcmistt y 

and Biology 
Music, Art, Oratory 

Ladies in the Moll are under the con- 
stant care of ihc Preceptress. 

Write por catalogue 

&ev. S. 2>. Sossard, President 
jfnnvifie, iPa. 



WINDSOR HOTEL 

W. T. BRUBAKER, Manager. 
European, $1.00 per day and up 
American, $2-50 per day and up 




BBHHBmI 



Midway between Broad Street 
Station and Reading Terminal 
on Filbert Street. 

The only moderate priced bolei ©I 
reputation and consequence in 

PHILADELPHIA 



baugh, of Red Lion, visited Mr. 
Lester Snyder last Saturday. 

Eighteen new members were ini- 
tiated, in the Clionian Literary So- 
ciety on Friday night. Ten others 
will be initiated this week. 

Dr. Z. H. Rodes, of York, visited 
his brother, Lester last week. 

Mr. Donohue, of Shamokin, visit- 
ed his son, Joseph, and accompanied 
the boys to the football game at Car- 
lisle last Wednesday. 

Mr. Sedic Rine, a former student 
here, stopped to see the boys last 
week. He was on his way to Phila- 
delphia where he is going to study 
medicine. 

Mr. Moyer, of Pinegrove, spent 
several days at the college visiting 
his grandson, Mr. Carl. 

Mr. Wm. C. Carl, of Philadelphia, 
a former student here, spent several 
days in town last week visiting 
friends. Mr. Carl is working for a 
Philadelphia poultry journal. 

Mr. J. Maurice Leister was elected 
prayer meeting leader for the com- 
ing year. 

Mr. Holler, of Hummelstown, a 
former football star, witnessed the 
football game on Saturday. 

Mr. W. G. Kroll and wife, of High- 
spire, visited Treas. W. H. Weaver 
and family last week. 

Miss Myra Kiracofe visited Mrs. J. 
Dixon Coover at her home in Pal- 
myra, last Monday. 

Miss Ausmus, of Chambersburg, 
visited a friend at the college on 
Saturday and witnessed the football 
game. 

Mrs. Oyler, of Chambersburg, vis- 
ited her daughter, Helen, over Sun- 
day. Miss Oyler has been sick for a 
few days with an attack of jaundice. 

Miss LaVerne Keister, of Mt. 
Pleasant, Pa., daughter of Dr. and 
Mrs. Lawrence Keister, is visiting 
her aunt, Mrs. Mary Mills, for a 
few days. 

Miss Josephine Mathias, '16, spent 
Sunday at her home in Highspire. 

Miss Edna Spessard visited friends 
at Hershey on Sunday. 

Miss Ruth V. Engle was at home 
over Sunday. 

Misses Huber and Case visited 
friends in Hummelstown on Sun- 
day. 

Miss Vera Myers was the leader 
for the Y. W. C. A. meeting on Sun- 
day. Her subject was "Sarah, the 
Partner, in a Supreme Enterprise." 
The meeting was a good one, and 
was well attended. 



SOPHOMORES ON HIKE 

Continued from page i 

they returned. When the Freshmen 
learned that the Sophomores had ar- 
rived there was a great noise of 
beds, bureaus and trunks being push- 
ed against the doors in the Fresh- 
men's rooms. Of course the Sopho- 
mores were very much amused. 



You are correct if you get your 

LADIES 9 and GENTS' 
FURNISHINGS 

At KINPORTS', Annville, Pa. 

Students' Discount Packard & Radcliffe Shoes 

W, D. ELLIOTT 
Shoemaker 

Repairing neately done. Rubber work a 
specialty. 

Patronage Solicited 
Main St. Annville, Pa. 

LIVERY 

First Class Teams to 
Hire 

Parties a Specialty 

H. F\ LONG & SON 
Rear Eagle Hotel Annville, F>« 

WM. WALTZ 
Hair Cutting and Shaving 
Saloon 

W. Main St. Annville, Pa 

For Cakes and Confectionery 

GO TO 

Bowman's Bakery 

A FULL SUPPLY OF HALL'S CHOCO^ 
LATES, ALWAYS FEESH 

W, Main St. 



Annville, Pa. 



Home-Wade Noodles, Peanut Butter 

H. B. FLOWERS 

Manufacturer of 

•'Flower Brand" Potato 
Chips 

LEBANON, PA. 

RAH! RAH! BOYS EAT 

Raw Oysters at "Ussy's" 

FRIED JUST 

R 

W. MAIN ST. 



OR EAT EM STEWED OR FRIED JUST AS 
YOU REFER 

A. S. MILLER 



A RULE 



' Put this down as a rule," says Dr. Bi/iieen 
"that the teacher who rails against; Teachers 
Agencies either has been refused admission to 
membership or has tried to evade the payment 
of a just debt." 

During twenty-seven years of earnest, intelli- 
gent, aggressive experience with teachers, we 
have found others— the applicants who do not 
know how to utilize the services of an .Agency 
and who resent suggestions. 

We devote about one-fourth the time and en- 
erg} of our organization to preparing these ap- 
plicants and lose annually hundreds of vacancies 
through their persistent inefficiency. Our work 
along this line will be continued as hopefully 
and as good naturedly as heretofore; for we find 
that most of our good, strong applicants were at 
one time, inexperienced in securing positirns. 

Every year since 1906 we have been in need of 
more applicants to fill the best positions in near- 
ly every grade of public and private school work 

THE TEACHERS' AGENCY 

F, L. MYERS & CO., 
Lemoyne Trust Bldg., Harrisburg, Pa Co 
operating agencies in Denver and Atlanta 



COIiliEGE flEWS 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLE 



Volume V. 



Annville, Pa., Tuesday, October 7, ll 



No. 4 



Kntered as second-clasg matter November 12, 1910, at the post office at Annville, Pa., under thfl Baiarch 3, 1879. 



BUGKNELL DEFEATS 
LEBANON VALLEY 



'"Lebanon Valley Smeared by 
Bucknell," is the heading used oy 
the 'Associated Press' to describe 
' the last game played, for it convey- 
ed graphically to one's mind just 
what happened. A score of 46 to 
against L. V. is sufficient to indi- 
cate a "smearing" of some sort. 
However, the game was not nearly 
so one-sided as it may seem by a 
first glance at the score. The 
Bucknell eleven, composed of eight 
men cf the 1912 season and three 
other husky new men, was in fit 
form to meet a team of Lebanon Val- 
ley's strength and administer a 
drubbing to it. We were both out- 
classed and out-played. Our opponents 
were heavier, faster and more ex- 
perienced than we were. The strong 
arm of Cruikshank made long for- 
ward passes. Topham, the star of 
many past reasons, was back on the 
Bucknell line-up and showed by his 
work that he was fast rounding into 
condition. Although playing only a 
half against us he bounded across 
our goal line three times after 
catching long forward passes. Buck- 
nell' s formation on these long pass- 
es, coupled with the strong arm of 
their quarterback, and the swiftness 
ot their fullback made possible gains 
of forty and forty-five yards in one 
down. 

A good bit of the spirit was taken 
out of the fellows after touchdowns 
from long runs after a still longer 
forward pass. The fighting temper 
stuck to the fellows till the last and 
am j d such reversing conditions thev 
S «H battled gamely 

Wheelock and Lerew, played a 
nard game and fought plucktly til! 
the w hlst ,e blew for thf flnal - tlmc> 

for f r rned the ba " continually 

gain. ° ften made man y 8°° d 

fca s. Wheelock, although playing 

with a twisted ankle. a knee in not 
an> to o good shape, and a nose very 
nlal^ b - Cken ' StUck to his and 
Umo 5S hardeSt dur,n * the w ^ 

i° surely ha * Uu - ***** 

n»,k-to-itivene S s— strong within 
™. and it is no wonder he made 
< -mtinued on page 2 



ENDOWMENT EUND CHI ?JH OFFICERS 

LI. 






The following organization of the 
Educational Association was affect- 
ed; R. R. Butterwick, D. D., was 
elected president and Professor A. 
E. Shroyer, vice president; M. H. 
Wert, Secretary and Treasurer. 

The above mentioned officers were 
also appointed to act as the execu- 
tive committee of the East Pennsyl- 
vania Conference, Educational Asso- 
ciation. The following resolutions 
were passed: — 

1 < That we as a committee re- 
commend the formation of an East 
Pensylvania Educational Associa- 
tion, composed of all graduates and 
friends of education in East Penn- 
sylvania Conference, to foster the 
interests of Lebanon Valley College. 

2. That we guarantee our hearty 
support of the resolution in the re- 
port of the committee on Education 
and our co-operation in carrying out 
the suggestions of the same on the 
several fields of the conference. 

The commiteee composed of R. R. 
Butterwick, D. D., Professor A. E. 
Shroyer and M. H. Wert shall act 
in conjunction with a similar com- 
mittee which shall be appointed in 
the Penna. Conference. These two 
committees shall render aid in what- 
ever way possible in a systematic 
campaign in raising an endowment 
of $300,000 for Lebanon Valley 
College, by whatever plan shall be 
given by the executive committee of 
Lebanon Valley college. The slogan 
of the Association is to be forward 
for greater things for L. V. C. 

Rev. R. R. Butterwick, Rev. E. O. 
Burtner, Rev. D. D. Lowery and Mr. 
S. C. Snoke were elected trustees of 
Lebanon Valley College. 



COLLEGE PASTOR RETIRES. 

Rev. H. B. Spayd, for the past 
five years college pastor, preached his 
last sermon last Sunday night, and 
on Wednesday left for conference. 
From conference Rev. Mr. Spayd, 
with his wife and daughter left 
for Modesto, California, R. R. No. 5. 

The "News" wishes them a safe 
journey and much success in their 
new home. 



On Monday morning at the eleven 
o'clock period, the student body was 
addressed by three general church of- 
ficers who stopped to visit the col- 
lege after attending "the East Penn- 
sylvania Conference. The speakers 
were Dr. S. S. Hough, Secretary of 
Foreign Missions; Dr. C. W. Brew- 
baker, Secretary of General Sunday 
School Work; and Dr. C. N. Schell, 
the Educational Secretary. 

Dr. Hough spoke of the great op- 
portunities of the college student, 
and said that the work outlined by 
the last General Conference opens a 
great work, especially in the mission 
field for college graduates. He lik- 
ened the college students to an irri- 
gation system. The students are like 
the'.water needed to irrigate the fieldsjof 
Japan and Africa, and give to them 
our civilization and education. 

Dr. Brewbaker spoke of Sunday 
school work, and the advantage of 
having graded schools. He also told 
of opportunities aside from that of 
the ministry and missionary work. 
He said that one of the greatest open- 
ings for a young man today is that 
of a religious educational director- 
ship. There are very few men quali- 
fied for this work, says Dr. Brubak- 
er, and the opening is one which 
young men about to begin their life's 
work should not overlook. 

Dr. Schell spoke of the education- 
al work of the church, and how thia 
work can be improved. He was very 
glad to see the enthusiasm shown 
at Lebanon Valley. He thinks that 
there are many out of college "chas- 
ing the dimes and nickels," who 
should be i ncollege. It is not the 
present alone of which the young 
man should think, but the future, 
with its successes or failures depend- 
ing upon his adequate or inadequate 
preparation for life. 

The meeting was well attended and 
had a broadening effect upon the 
student body. We appreciate visits 
from men who are interested in the 
work of young people. 



Mr. and Mrs. D. D. Snyder, of 
Middleburg, Pa., spent several days 
with his brother, Mr. Kratzer last 



m eek. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



College J^eous 



Issued weekly during- the College 
Year by the Students of Lebanon 
Valley College 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 
it. Ml weidler '14 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

FLORENCE MEN-JjZ '15 

John b. lyter^H 
Social 

ESTA WAREHEIM '16 

Athletics 
PHILO STATTON '15 

Alumni 

! ! PAUL STRICKLE R '14 

Music 
RAY P. OAMPBE&L 

BUSINESS MANAGER 

HARRY CHARLTON '14 

* Subscription Price $1.00 per year 
Single Copies 5 cts. 
Clubs of ten, 75 cts. 

Address all business communications 

to HARRY CHARLTON '14 all Other 

matter to Room 22, Adminis ra- 
tion Building Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege, Annville, Pa. 



"An endowment fund of at least 
$300,000 is the hope of the leading 
men of the East Pennsylvania Con- 
ference as the means of boosting Leb- 
anon Valley College at Annville, 
which splendidly equipped with 
buildings and possessed of a fine 
teaching force and a growing stu- 
dent body numbering almost three 
hundred this year, is doing a splen- 
did work for the United Brethren 
Church." 

The above clipping from the "Al- 
lentown Morning Call" tells exactly 
what Lebanon Valley today is, and 
what efforts are being put forth in 
her behalf. The outlook for the col- 
lege is brighter now than it has been 
for years. Our President, Dr. Gos- 
sard, takes his place with the most 
successful and best presidents in the 
history of the College. The faculty 
at Lebanon Valley cannot be surpass- 
ed, indeed it is doubtful whether it 
has its equal in any college of its size 
in the state. The student body is 
larger than it has been for many 
years. The buildings are new and 
are in first class condition. Every- 
thing points toward success, especial- 
ly since the support needed from the 
church is now becoming a reality. 

The church and the college depend 
upon each other to a great extent for 
their success. The one cannot exist, 
and do its work properly, without the 
pther. The duty of the college is to 
supply good, consecrated, well train- 
ed men for its ministry; to supply 
educated men and women to push 
forth its work as laymen. This work 
Lebanon Valley is doing. Of nine- 
teen men who received annual con- 
ference licenses to preach at the East 



Pennsylvania conference this year, 
nearly ninety per cent, were Leba- 
non Valley graduates or students. 
How many United Brethren congre- 
gations are there throughout Penn- 
sylvania and Maryland, in which 
graduates of Lebanon Valley are not 
taking an active part? Few, very 
few. On the other hand, the church 
owes it to its college to support it, 
and make this noble work possible. 
Some may think that church col- 
leges cannot compete with the state 
institutions, but in how many col- 
leges and universities which are not 
connected with some denomination 
do you find the same Christian in- 
fluence? Here at Lebanon Valley, 
we have a weekly prayer meeting, 
Y. M. and Y. W. C. A. meetings; we 
are surrounded by a Christian fac- 
ulty, and the influence of college 
church. Can an institution putting 
forth such an influence be neglected 
and allowed to shift for itself by its 
mother, the Church. We do not 
think so, and the Church does not, 
for at the last session of the East 
Pennsylvania Conference, resolutions 
were passed to make possible the 
raising of an endowment fund of 
$300,000 for Lebanon Valley. With 
the excellent institution that she al- 
ready is, and with this large endow- 
ment, for wihch church and college 
are working hand in hand, Lebanon 
Valley is destined to become one of 
the best influences for education and 
good in the country. 

The "News" sincerely hopes that 
Lebanon Valley may continue to be 
the influence for good that she has 
been in the past, only a hundred fold 
more so, and also wishes to thank in 
behalf of Lebanon Valley her special 
guardians, the East Pennsylvania, 
and Pennsylvania conferences for 
what they have done for her in the 
past, and what we are sure they are 
going to do for our dear Alma Mater 
in the future. 



FOOT BALL 



Continued from page i 



good. Wheelock's line plunging 
and defensive work was of the high- 
est order, throughout the entire 
game. 

Lerew shewed his old fighting 
spirit on Saturday and no matter 
how many times he was "knocked 
out" he came back strong on every 
rush. He carried the ball for a 
good many games and used judge- 
ment on the running of the team. 

On the whole, the fellows fcught 
till the last and their defeat can only 
be accorded to the superiority of 
their opponents. Capt. Strickler al- 
though with his team, could not get 
into the game on account of his in- 
jured instep. His absence from the 
line-up again proved a source of 
weakness to the team. 



Buckneli Lebanon Valley 

Shipman . . .L. E E. Snavely 

Hern (Markle) ... L. T. . . . Mackert 

(Huber ) 

Reading. L. G.. Mickey (Bachman) 
Shafner (Saunders). R. G. . DeHuff 

Piatt R. T Statton 

Sturgis (Archer). R. E. C. Snavely 

Cuikshank Q. B Lerew 

Keyser L. H. B Donahue 

Gcanaic . . . .R .H. B Wheelock 

Topham (Sturgis) ...T. B Pell 

Touchdowns — Topham, 3; Keyser, 
Hern, Sturgis, Donaldson. Goals from 
touchdown — Topham, Piatt, 3. Ref- 
eree — Wolfe — Cornell. Umpire — 
Church, Bloomsburg Normal. Quar- 
ters — tvelve minutes. 



Reserves bow to Reading white 
the varsity was meeting their fate 
at Buckneli, the scrubs were losing 
to Reading High at Reading by the 
score of 20 to 0. The scrubs de- 
serve great credit for the way in 
which they battled against greatly 
superior edds. Although the scrubs 
presented a beany line up, Reading 
likewise put on the field a team av- 
eraging in weight as much as the 
Scrubs. The score does not indicate 
the plucky fight the scrubs puS: up, 
posing out only on fumbles when 
within striking distance of Read- 
ings goal. Capt. Evans played a 
great game at quarter-back. It was 
chiefly throuarh his efforts that the 
score was held tc the score that it 
was. Schwartz and Schmidt likewise 
played great games in the backfield. 
For Reading Potts and S. Charlton 
starred. 

Reading H. S. L. V. C. 

Sabinsky L. E Bender 

Dunkleberger . . .L. T. . . . Charlton 
Zimmerman ...L. G. ... Brenneman 
Czarkosivitch . . .Centre. . . Wenrich 

Jones R. G Light 

B. Charlton . . . .R. T Loomas 

Potts ...R. E. . . . Rupp (Horstick) 

Skerke Q. B Evans (Capt.) 

Grabowski . ... .L. H. B Machen 

(Zie<der) 

Murphy R. H. B. . , . . Schmidt 

S. Charlton (Capt.) F. B. Schwartz 

Score: Reading 20; L. V. C, 0. 

Touchdowns — S. Charlton. 2; 
Potts. Goal from touchdown — 
Charlton, 2. Referee — Werner, 
Dickinson. Umpire — Culpepper — 
St. Louis. Head lineman — -Sophelsky. 
Thiel of Texas. Time of quarters — 
10 minutes. 



.Manager H. E. Snavely has lately 
filled the hitherto open date, Satur- 
day. Oct. 11, by securing a game 
with the Pierce Business college of 
Philadelphia. This .school has a 
comparatively strong team and a 
good game is expected. This same 
will serve as one to keep the fellows 
in condition for the game the ne.vt 
week with Washington college, 
Chestertowh,- Md. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



SOCIETY PROGRAMS 



CLIONIAN LITERARY SOCIETY 

Paper Ethel Houser 

Reading Maud Baker 

Piano Duet, 

Blanche Black, Ruth Whiskeyman 

Original Story Belle Orris 

Piano Solo May Meyer 

Monolgue Elta Weaver 

Chorus Society 

KALOZETEAN. 

Happenings About School, 

J. Hollinger 
My Impression of College Life, 

Chas. Loomis 

Song Society 

Debate — Resolved, That L. V. C. 
should require each regular student 
to take courses in English composi- 
tion of not less than 2 hours per 
week throughout the whole college 
course. 

Affirmative — E. George, 1. C. Eby. 
Negative — I. S. Ernst, H. H. Charlton 
Piano Solo P. M. Linebaugh 

PHILOKOSMIAN. 

A Nation's Neglect ... Albert Shaud 
Sketch, 

Lester Snyder, Paul J. Witmeyer 
Debate — Resolved, That William 

Jennings Bryan, Secretary of State, 

was unjustly criticised for lecturing 

on Chautauqua programs. 

Affirmative — Lester A. Rodes, Russell 
M. Weidler. 

Negative — D. Leonard Reddick, Ed- 
ward H. Smith. 

Piano Solo Harry Kleffman 

New Wonders of Photography, 

Joseph W. Bomberger 

Parody h. L. Olewiler 

ALUMNI. 

Dr. J. E. Kleffman, '89, and wife 
visited their son at school last Wed- 
nesday. Dr. Kleffman is pastor of 
the United Brethren church at 
Chambersburg and a member of the 
trustee board of Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege. 

Mr. Jesse T. Yoder, '10, is taking 
a special course in Y. M. C. A. work 
at Chicago, 111. 

Miss Jessie Brane, '09 of conserva- 
tory, of Dayton, Ohio, is visiting 
friends in Lebanon. 

Mr. Max Lehman, '07, of Balti- 
more; Mr. John Lehman, '11, of 
Steelton, and Miss Edith Lehman, 
'13, of Royersford, spent Sunday with 
their parents, Dr. and Mrs. J. E. Leh- 
man. 



MUSIC. 

-•Because of the increase in the 
number of music students this year 
the Conservatory Management has 
found it necessary to add another 
piano to its already large number. 
Op Thursday, of last week, a fine 
new Troup piano was placed in Prof. 
Sheldon's studio, Room 1 of the Con- 
-servatory, by the Tronp Piano Com- 
pany 6f:jJarrisburg. The piano which' 



had formerly been in use in Room 
1 was removed to Room 3 of the 
Conservatory, which room has been 
equipped as a studio for Miss Bach- 
man. These necessary changes show 
that the Conservatory of Music is 
advancing to the front, as well as 
the other branches of the college. 

Last week another member was 
added to the student body of the Con- 
servatory. Miss Elsie Folmer, of 
Lebanon, is taking a course in piano. 
We wish her rapid progress in her 
work. 

On Friday Miss Mabel Shanaman 
went to her home in Richland, Pa., 
where she passed Saturday and Sun- 
day visiting her parents and friends. 

Mr. Fred Arnold spent the week- 
end very pleasantly at his home in 
Lickdale, Pa. 



Patronize the 



JOINT SESSION. 

On Sunday afternoon the Y. W. 
and Y. M. C. A. met in joint session. 
The meeting was planned by the mis- 
sionary committees of the two as- 
sociations, and was a missionary 
meeting. The topic was "A Cotton 
String, or What We Get From the 
Foreign Field." Mr. C. E. Brenne- 
man, chairman of the Y. M. C. A. 
missionary committee, was the lead- 
er. He spoke about "What We Give 
to the Foreign Field." Miss Mary 
Daugherty read the story of "A Cot- 
ton String" and Mr. Paul Bowman 
spoke about "What We Get From 
the Foreign Field." Miss Katherine 
Bachman sang a very pretty and ap- 
propriate solo. The service was in- 
teresting and helpful, and was well 
attended. 



A CORRECTION. 

The volume number of the Col- 
lege News is wrong, and in order to 
correct it we have decided to num- 
ber it right, beginning with this 
number. 

Last year the paper was volume 

IV part of the year and volume V 
the remaining part; but according to 
calculation this year should be vol- 
ume V. So this issue will be volume 

V number 4. 

Please bear this in mind and do 
not become confused, for you will 
have almost two years voliimed V. 



MISS MENTZ RECOVERING. 

Miss Florence C. Mentz, who was 
operated on several weeks ago at 
the Lebanon Sanatorium, is recover- 
ing rapidly. Though the operation was 
a serious one and her condition criti- 
cal, yet she is now in such a condi- 
tion that all she needs is to regain 
her former strength. 

Miss Mentz is very cheerful and 
enjoys visits from her friends as it 
helps drive loneliness away. 

Miss Mary Minnich, of Chambers- 
burg, spent several days at the col- 
lege last week, visiting Cumberland 
valley friends. 



Academy Tailon 

DAVID B. BASHO^E 



Clothing Called for 
and Returned 



Academy Bldg 
Room 18 



D. B. SHIFFER 
GRADUATE OPTICIAN 

Eyes Examined, Glasses Fitted, Broken 
Lenses Replaced, anything in 
the Optical line 

East Main St ANNVILLE 



You get only the best at 

GOLLAM'S 

Quantity ✓ * * Quality 
Main Street 




Standard Quality 

There is no quicksand more un- 
stable than poverty in quality and 
we avoid this quicksand by standard 
quality. 

Tennis, Golf, Base Ball, Cricket, Foot Ball, 
Basket Ball, Athletic Equipment. 
Catalogue Free. 

A. G. SPALDING I BROS. 



6-30 Nissau St. 



25 W. 42d St., 



HIV YO!K 



M. F. Batdorf sSon 

Ladies' <md Gents' 
Furnishings 



Main Street 



Annvill 



JOS. MILLER 

FURNITURE 
and UNDERTAKING 



West Main Street 



Annville, Pa. 



JACOB SARGENT 



merchant 

TAILOR . 

READY-TO WEAR CLOTHING 

Main Street Annville 

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 

% SCHOOL of VV 
ENGINEERING 

CIVIL MECHANICAL, ELECTRICAL and CHEMICAL 
ENGINEERING, and GENERAL SCIENCE , 

Send for a Catalogue. TROY, N.Y* 



COLLEGE NEWS 



GO TO IT BOYS 



ITS 



Russ Brothers 
Velvet Ice Cream 



AT 



"USSY'S" 

A. S. MILLER. W. iWain St. 

jCebanon 1/alley 
College 

First Class Faculty. 
Group System. 

Special Facilities in Chemistt y 

and Biology 
Music, Art, Oratory 

Ladies in the Hall are under the con- 
stant care of the Preceptress. 

Write for catalog ue 

&ei>. S. 0. Sossard, President 
jtfnnviite, SPa. 



WINDSOR HOTEL 

W. T. BRUBAKER, Manager. 
European, $1.00 per day and up 
American, $2.50 per day and up 



Midway between Broad Street 
Station and Reading Terminal 
on Filbert Street. 

The only moderate priced hotel of 
reputation and consequence in 

PHILADELPHIA 



ITEMS OF INTEREST 

Miss Margaret Myers visited 
friends at Camp Hill on Sunday. 

Miss Ruth Bender spent Sunday at 
Penbrook the guest of Miss Ruth 
Loser. 

Mr. E. H. Smith and Mr. D. L. 
Reddeck went to Mt. Gretna on Sun- 
day. 

Coach R. J. Guyer spent Sunday 
at his home near Shippensburg. 

Miss Mary Zug, of Chambersburg, 
visited her cousin, Mr. Lester Zug, 
on Sunday. 

The tables at the dining hall were 
arranged last week. Now we are 
in a systematic condition, if not a 
comfortable one, for we are very 
much crowded. 

Rev. C. A. Mutch, of Schuylkill 
Haven, visited his son and daughter 
at the college last Tuesday. Rev. 
Mutch was on his way to confer- 
ence. 

Mr. Lutz spent the week-end with 
his parents at Denver. 

Mr. David Baker visited friends 
near Philadelphia over Sunday. 

Mr. Jacob Shenberger was called 
to his home in Dallastown on Satur- 
day. . 

Misses Ruth Engle and Myra 
Kiracofe spent Sunday with Miss 
Hartzler at her home in Manneim. 

Mr. Lester Rodes spent Sunday at 
his home in Wormleysburg. 

Miss Oyier, who has been sick for 
the last few weeks, went home on 
Sunday to spend some time. Her in- 
tention is to regain her strength be- 
fore taking up her school work. 

Mrs. G. D. Gossard and daughter, 
Mary, and Miss Minnie Gossard left 
Saturday for a visit among friends 
at Greencastle, Pa. 

Rev. Joseph Daugherty, 8 ft, visit- 
ed the college on Monday. 

Miss Catharine Hershey, of Her- 
shey, spent a day at the college last 
week. Miss Hershey was formerly a 
member of the class of 1912. 



PHIL0K0SMIAN OFFICERS. 

On Friday night the Philokosmian 
Literary Society installed "her officers 
for the first term. They are as fol- 
lows: 

President, Lester A. Rodes. 

Vice President, John H. Ness. 

Recording , Secretary. S. Huber 
Heintzelman. 

Corresponding Secretary. David J. 
Evans. 

Critic, Russell M. Weidler. 
Judge, D. Leonard Reddick. 
Chaplain, C. E. Brenneman. 
Pianist, John O. Jones. 
Editor, Conrad K. Curry. 
Janitor, Allen B. Engle. 
Assistant Janitor, J. Arthur Wis- 
ner. 

Second Assistant Janitor, Harold 
Wine. 



You are correct if you get your 

LADIES' and GENTS' 
FURNISHINGS 

At KINPORTS', Annville, Pa. 



Students' Discount 



Packard & Radcliffc Shoes 



W. D. ELLIOTT 
Shoemaker 

Repairing neately done. Rubber work a 
specialty. 

Patronage Solicited 
Main St. Annville, Pa. 

LIVERY 

First Class Teams to 
Hire 
I J tt rt ie»* a Specialty 
H. F\ LONG & SON 

Rear Eagle Hotel Annville, Pa 

WM. WALTZ 
Hair Cutting and Shaving 
Saloon 



W. Main St. 



Annville, Pa 



For Cakes and Confectionery 

GO TO 

Bowman's Bakery 

A FULL SUPPLY OF HALL'S CHOCO- 
LATES. ALWAYS FRESH 

W. Main St. 



Annville, Pa. 



Hemc-Made Noodles, Peanut Butter 

H. B. FLOWERS 

Manufacturer of 

' Flower Brand" Potato 
Chips 

LEBANON, PA. 

RAH! RAH! BOYS EAT 

Raw Oysters at "Ussy's" 

OR EAT EM STEWED OR FRIED JUST AS 
YOU REFER 

A. S. MILLER W. MAIN ST. 



A BULE 



' Put this down as a rule," says Dr. Bardeen 
"that the teacher who rails against Teachers 
Agencies either has been refused admission to 
membership or has tried to evade the payment 
of a just debt." 

During twenty-seven years of earnest, intelli- 
gent, aggressive experience with teachers, we 
have found others— the applicants who do not 
know how to utilize the services of an Agency 
and who resent suggestions. 

We devote about one-fourth the time and en- 
erg} of our organization to preparing these ap- 
plicants and lose annually hundreds of vacancies 
through their persistent inefficiency. Our work 
along this line will be continued as hopefully 
and us good naturedly as heretofore; for we find 
that most of our good, strong applicants were at 
one time inexperienced in securing positions. 

Kvery year since 1905 we have been in need of 
more applicants to fill the best positions in near- 
i> every grade of public and private school work 

THE TEACHERS 1 AGENCY 

R. L. MYERS & CO., 
Lemoync Trust Bldg., Harrisburg, Pa Co 
operating agencies in Denver and Atlanta 



coiiiiECtr jnlews 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



Volume V. flnnville, Pa., Tuesday, October 14, 1913 Ho. 5 

Entered as second -diss matter November 12. 1910, at the post office at Armville, Pa., under the act of March 3, 1879. 



COLLEGE DAY ST SOCIAL EVENTS OF 
PA, CONFERENCE THE PAST WEEK 



LEBANON VALLEY 
WINS FROM PIERCE 

For the second time this season, 
students of Lebanon Valley had the 
privilege of seeing their team play- 
ing football on the home field. The 
opposing eleven was from Pierce Col- 
lege, Philadelphia. The game was 
on the whole, easy for Lebanon Val- 
ley and at no time were the Phila- 
delphians dangerous 

The game started with a forward 
pass from Lerew to Statton, which 
gained fifty yards and paved the way 
for a touchdown within a minute 
On the third rush, Wheelock carried 
the ball over the goal line for the 
first of our series of touchdowns. 
During the forty- eight minutes of 
play, Lebanon Valley carried the 
ball at will and held Pierce to a 
standstill. Our opponents were only 
capable Of three first downs during 
the four quarters. 

Joel Wheelock played his usual 
steady but brilliant game and plung- 
ed through the line for many gains. 

Lerew ran the team with his old 
tims snap, and showed judgment in 
every play. 

In the fourth quarter with the 
score standing 62-0, Coach Guyer 
put in the entire scrub line-up. Ev- 
ans at quarter back proved his worth 
when on receiving the ball from the 
first kick-off of the period, ran eighty 
yards in order to make his acquaint- 
ance with the goal-posts at the north 
end of the field. Had there been one 
more minute in the last quarter the 
scrubs would have undoubtedly scor- 
ed seven points more. 

Great improvement is seen in the 
Varsity's work On the offensive, 
the men are going into things hard- 
er and more steadily; on the defens- 
ive, the line repaired many of its 
faulty places and the backfield tack- 
ling is deadly. 

Pierce. T>. V. 

Schracas L. E E. Snavely 

(Rupp) 

Grant L. T Mackert 

(Huber) 
Continued on page 2 



The Pennsylvania Conference, 
which was held at Greencastle, made 
plans and passed resolutions for the 
benefit of Lebanon Valley College. 
Wednesday afternoon was given over 
to Christian education. Dr. W. C. 
Schell, secretary of General Educa- 
tion, and Dr. G. D. Gossard, presi- 
dent of Lebanon Valley college, made 
the principal addresses. The minor 
addresses were given by twelve Leb- 
anon Valley graduates, each touching 
on a different phase of college work. 
When the census was taken of L. V. 
men thirty-five graduates were found 
to be in the active ministry. 

At this meeting a Conference 
Board of Education was formed, com- 
posed of the following men: Rev. 
Messrs. A. A. Long, W. N. McFaul, 
C. E. Fultz, and J. S. Smith. These 
men are to co-operate with similar 
committees from the other confer- 
ences in Lebanon Valley's constitu- 
ency and p?an for the $300,000 en- 
dowment. 

Trustees for the college were elect- 
ed to serve three years on the col- 
lege board. They are as follows: 
Rev. Messrs. A. B. Statton, W. O. 
Appenzellar, L. Walter Lutz and A. 
A. Long. 

The conference has again pledged 
its support to the college, and the 
college agent is to be invited to 
come to the different charges. 



MR. MILLS PRESENTS 
BOOKS TO LIBRARY 



Mr. Alfred Keister Mills, '04, of 
Annville, presented the college li- 
brary with a large number of valu- 
able volumes. Among the list is a 
complete set of the "Photographic 
History of the Civil War." 

We are very glad to receive these 
books, for our library is in need 
of books, but we take more pleasure 
in announcing - the donor. Friendsthat 
help are the means of keeping the 
school in existence. 



DEUTCHER VERREIN HIKE 

Last Wednesday evening the 
Deutscher Verrein enjoyed a moon- 
light walk to the Water Works. The 
party left at six o'clock, and about 
an hour later arrived at the Water 
Works hotel. Here a pleasant even- 
ing was spent in singing, vaudeville 
acts, story telling and clog dancing 
by several of the talented ones. The 
German language was used, almost 
exclusively, very little English be- 
ing heard. About nine o'clock a full 
dinner consisting of fried chicken, 
waffles, country ham, sweet potatoes, 
mashed potatoes, corn, peas, celery, 
and many other good things, together 
with ice cream, cake and coffee was 
served. At a late hour the party 
returned to the college, after having 
spent a most pleasant evening. Miss. 
Seltzer acted as chaperone, and those 
in the party were: The Misses. 
Schmidt, Nellie Seltzer, Risser, Gru- 
ber, Page, Case, Hertzler, Wyand, 
Strickler and Messrs. Schmidt, Stick- 
ler, Charlton, Walter, Tom Lyter,, 
Evans and John Lyter. 

CHAFING DISH PARTY. ' 

Misses Myra Kiracofe, Ruth V. 
Engle, Luella Hurtzler and Belle Or- 
ris entertained Messrs. Ness, Zug, 
Reddick and Smith at a chafing dish 
party on Saturday night. The young 
people all enjoyed the good "eats'* 
and one another's company. 

MISS JOHNSON ENTERTAINS. 

In the Ladies' Parlors, Friday af- 
ternoon from 4 to 6 o'clock, the 
members of the classes in English 8 
and English 9 were delightfully en- 
tertained by Miss Johnson. She 
gave one of her celebrated teas which 
was, as usual, successful in every 
respect. A cosy little tea-table was 
set, dainty refreshments were served 
and the hostess was very entertain- 
ing. 

On Thursday night the lady teach- 
ers entertained the second floor dor-„ 
mitory girls at tea. 



I 



COLLEGE NEWS 



College Heuus 



Issued weekly during' the College 
Year by the Students of Lebanon 
Valley College 



EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

R. M. WEIDLER '14 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 
florence mentz '15 
John b. lyter '14 

Social 
esta wareheim '16 

Athletics 
PHILO STATTON '15 

Alumni 

PAUL STRICKLER '14 

Music 

RAY P. CAMPBELL 

BUSINESS MANAGER 

HARRY CHARLTON '14 

Subscription Price $1.00 per year 
Single Copies 5 cts. 
Clubs of ten, 75 cts. 

Address all business communications 

tO HARRY CHARLTON '14 all Other 

matter to Room 22, Administra- 
tion Building Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege, Annville, Pa. 

CLEAN SPORTS. 

What the visiting team says about 
the home team, especially when de- 
feated by them, is worth knowing. 
If they have nothing good to say, 
our team must lack the sportsmans 
spirit and must border on athletic 
club rowdyism; but when they say 
nothing but good, we can feel that 
we are supporting a team of college 
football heroes. 

Last Saturday the Pierce team left 
our college with a degree of sadness. 
They were treated as friends, defeat- 
ed in clean football, and had their 
broken spirits and bruised bodies 
healed with sympathy from feminine 
lips. 

Clean sports are what we want, 
and may we always strive to play 
and act in such a fashion that wheth- 
er we win or lose we come out the 
victor in some respects. Satisfied 
contestants are good advertisers, this 
is a thing we should remember. 



MISS MENTZ RECOVERING 
RAPIDLY. 

Miss Mentz is rapidly recovering 
from her late sickness and will in a 
few weeks be around school once 
again. She appears to be in remark- 
ably good health considering the seri- 
ousness of her operation. The stu- 
dents always regret when one of their 
number is on the sick list, and now 
they express their thankfulness that 
Miss Mentz is speedily convalescing. 




TO 





L 




Mr. and Mrs. Charles H. Pastor, of 
1609 Green street, yesterday an- 
nounced the engagement of their 
daughter, Mary L. Pastor, to the Rev. 
Harry E. Ulrich. Both are well 
known young people of Harrisburg. 

Miss Pastor was a member of the 
class of 1912 of Central High School, 
and is now employed in the account- 
ing department of the Bell Telephone 
Company. Rev. Ulrich completed the 
course at Central High School in 
1910. He was graduated with the 
degree of A. B. from Lebanon Val- 
ley College in June, 1913, and is at 
present serving an appointment at 
Intercourse Lancaster county. 

The wedding will be an event of 
the Christmas holidays. — Harrisburg 
Patriot. 



LEBANON VALLEY 
WINS FROM PIERCE 



Continued from page 1 

Valman L. G Mickey 

(Brenneman) 

Nadef C Von Berghy 

(Wenrick) 

Schanbacher . ..R. G Hollinger 

(Shenberger) 

Peld R. T Dehuff 

(Light) 

Reed R. E Statton 

(Bender) 

Blake Q. B Lerew 

(Evans) 

Parbacher . . .L. H. B Donahue 

(Machen) 

Bachman . . .R. H. B Wheelock 

(Schmidt) 

Remmey F. B Pell 

(Bachman) 
Touchdowns: Pell, 3; Wheelock, 
2; Donahue, Von Berghy, Mackert, 
2; Evans. Goals from touch: 
Wheelock, 3; Snavely, 2; Lerew, 2; 
Evans. Referee: Barnhart. Um- 
pire: Chadwick. Head linesman: 
Lehman. Time of quarter: 10 min- 
utes. 



Y. M. C. A. 

The association meeting on Sunday 
afternoon was interesting and help- 
ful. The meeting, because of the 
absence of the leader, was conduct- 
ed by the local president. He used 
"Service" as his subjects and invit- 
ed all the men to take part in the 
meeting, for in that way they could 
be of service. Many responded with 
helpful remarks. 



Alumni 




Dr. R. R. Butterwick, '01, of 
Mountville, President of the Alumni 
Association and President of the East 
Pennsylvania Conference Education- 
al Association, transacted some busi- 
ness at the college last week. 

Professor Anselm Vinet Hiester, 
'87, of the department of Political 
Science at Franklin and Marshall 
college, received the honorary de- 
gree of Doctor of Science from Ur- 
sinus college last Tuesday at the 
inauguration of 'President Geo. S. 
Omwake. 

Francis R. Kenneday, '11, is 
working in the Miners' Y. M. C. A. 
Benham, Kentucky. 

Paul M. Vogt, '12, is teaching in 
the Porter Military Academy, Char- 
lestown, S. C. 

Miss Nellie Seltzer, '12, who is 
teaching in Parksburg, spent part of 
last week at the college, the guest of 
Miss Johnson. 

Miss Edith Freed, '10, of Ardmore, 
visited her mother, Mrs. Violette 
Freed, on Saturday and Sunday. 

Dr. W. H. Washinger, '91, of 
Chambersburg, was elected superin- 
tendent of the Pennsylvania confer- 
ence for the tenth consecutive term. 

Josiah F. Reed, '12, of West Mil- 
ton, visited the college on Sunday. 

Rev. H. E. Miller, '00, of Lebanon, 
who has been kept to his bed for the 
past few weeks on account of nerv- 
ous disorders, being compelled to 
miss conference, is reported to be im- 
proving rapidly. 

Clinton J. Barr, '88, of Lebanon, 
was a happy spectator at the Leba- 
non Valley-Pierce game on Satur- 
day. 

Floyd Shaeffer, '10, has returned 
to Johns Hopkins, where he will take 
his last year in preparation for the 
medical profession. 

Miss Verda Snyder, '11, of the de- 
partment of oratory, is taking work 
at The Emerson School of Oratory, 
Boston, Mass. 

Mr. J. E. Jacoby, '10, is taking 
graduate work at Harvard Univer- 
sity. 

Mr. Albert D. Flook, '09, is sick 
with typhoid fever. The "News" 
hopes that he may soon recover and 
get back to his work. 



Y. W. C. A. 

Miss Myra Kiracofe led the Y. W 
C. A. meeting on Sunday. Her sub- 
ject was "Live for the Present." 
Miss Catherine Bachman sang a very 
appropriate solo. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



SOCIETY PROGRAMS 



Song Society 

Examiner Editor 



Patronize the 



CLIONIAN. 

Piano Solo Mae Meyer 

Essay Myra Kiracofe 

Pleading Elta Weaver 

Paper, Our College Town And The 
Country Surrounding It, 

La Rene Engle 

Solo (vocal) Ruth Strickler 

Sketch, 

Viola Gruber, Esther Moyer, Mary 

Daugherty. 
Chorus Society 

SOPHRONEAN. 

Pen Points Geo. W. Hallman 

Academy Calendar for September, 

H. E. Shaeffer 
Debate, Resolved, That man is a 

creature of his environment. 
Affirmative — Harold Wrightstone, R. 

R. McClure. 
Negative — Mark Y. Light, Harold 

Wine. 
Whistling Quartette, 
Harold Wrightstone, Geo. Hallman, 

H. E. Shaeffer, R. H. Arndt. 
Live Wire Editor 

PHILOKOSMIAN. 

Intercollegiate Clippings, 

Raymond H. Arndt 
Some Popular Hoaxers, 

Harold K. Wrightstone 
Debate, Resolved, That Fraternities 
should be organized at Lebanon 
Valley, 

Affirmative — J. W. Lerew, A. L. 
Weaver. 

Negative — Robert Hartz, Paul J. 
Bowman. 

Piano Solo , . .Ray Campbell 

What I Am Trying To Do, 

John H. Ness 
Living Thoughts Editor 

KALOZETEAN. 

Current Events J. W. Oakes 

Essay on Girls Ray Light 

My Experiences at Wildwood, 

V. Heffelfinger 

Vocal Solo Earl Eichelberger 

How to Sell Lumber. .Edgar Landis 
When I Was a Hero Wm. Mickey 



1 





Since the school year has opened, 
it has been found that the tennis 
players cannot be accommodated on 
the present courts, so two new ones 
are being constructed. These courts 
should be completed by the end of 
the week, as the work is being rush- 
ed as rapidly as possible. The sod 
has nearly all been removed, and af- 
ter being leveled and rolled, the 
courts will be ready for use. 

Coach Guyer has arranged with 
President Gossard to have several 
men line and roll the courts each 
morning, so that they will be kept 
in perfect condition. Manager 
Schmidt, '14, is anxious that all 
who are interested in tennis, play 
as much as possible during the au- 
tumn, since a tennis team for next 
spring is a certainty, and he de- 
sires a winning team. 



jj^Jtems of Interest ^ 

Rev. O. M. Jones, of Paradise, vis- 
ited his son, John, last Tuesday. 

Mr. and Mrs. H. F. Carl, of Pal- 
myra, visited their son last week. 

Miss Snyder, of Chambersburg, 
spent several days with her sister, 
and witnessed the Pierce vs. Leba- 
non Valley football game. 

Miss Helen Oyler, who has been 
ill at her home in Chambersburg, has 
returned to school. 

Prof. E. B. Ulrich, assistant pro- 
fessor of zoology in the Central High 



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PHILADELPHIA 



School, Philadelphia, has asked our 
Professor of Biology, lo recommend 
two assistants for his department. 
Any person wishing the position can 
write to Prof. Ulrich concerning the 
situation. 

Miss Cora Baker, a nurse in the 
Jefferson Hospital, Philadelphia, is 
visiting her sister and brother. 

J. Paul Rupp, of Oberlin, visited 
his brother, Russel Rupp, on Friday 
and Saturday. 

Paul L. Strickler and Thomas 
Lyter attended a house party at Mt. 
Gretna over the week-end. 



GLEE CLUBS 





On Monday evening, Oct. 6, all 
applicants for the twelve vacant po- 
sitions in the Men's Glee Club were 
given a try-out by Prof. Sheldon, di- 
rector of the Glee Club, in his studio. 
Excellent material was found among 
the large number of aspirants for the 
positions. The club this year will 
be composed of the following, includ- 
ing both the old and newly chosen 
members: Messrs. Stengle, E. Snave- 
ly, Bender, J. Long, Ed. Smith, 
Shearer, Bar-net, Deibler, Ernst, Stat- 
ton, Weaver, M. Long, Kleffman, P. 
Bachman, Charlton, C. Snavely, Von 
Bergy, Lutz and Reber. In previous 
years the Glee Club has consisted of 
only sixteen voices but this year the 
number has been increased to twen- 
ty. The organization has already 
started to plan its work, and we be- 
lieve it will be successful and prove 
a credit to the college. 

This year the Girls' Glee Club will 
be composed of practically all new 
members as only three of the mem- 
bers of last year's club have returned 
to school. On Thursday evening Miss 
Schmidt met all the young ladies who 
desired to try for the positions. She 
has not as yet announced whom she 
has chosen to fill out the club. 



NEW VIOLIN INSTRUCTOR. 

Mrs. Z. Von Bergehy, for the past 
ten years instructor in violin at 
Irving college, MechanicsDurg, has 
been elected to a similar position at 
Lebanon Valley. Mrs. Von Bereghy 
is a fine musician and a good teach- 
er, and we know she will have an 
excellent class of students here. 

Journal Publishing Co. 

Printers 



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OR EAT EM STEWED OR FRIED JUST AS 
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' Put this down as a rule," says Dr. Bardeen 
"that the teacher who rails against Teachers 
Agencies either has been refused admission to 
membership or has tried to evade the payment 
of a just debt.' 

During twenty-seven years of earnest, intelli- 
gent, aggressive experience with teachers, we 
have found, others— the applicants who do not 
know how to utilize the services of an Agency 
and who resent suggestions. 

We devote about one-fourth the time and en- 
eifr) of our organization to preparing these ap- 
plicants and lose annually hundreds of vacancies 
through their persistent inefficiency. Our work 
along this line will be continued as hopefully 
and as good naturedly as heretofore; for we find 
that most of our good, strong applicants were at 
one tithe inexperienced in securing positions. 

Every year since '905 we have been in need of 
more applicants to till the best positions in near- 
ly every grade of public and private school work 

THE TEACHERS' AGENCY 

F. L. MYERS & CO., 
Lemoyne Trust Bldg., Harrisburg, Pa Co 
operating agencies in Denver and Atlanta 



COIiliEC^ flEWS 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



Volume V. Annville, Pa., Tuesday, Oetobep 21, 1913 Ho. 6 

Entered as second-class matter November 12, 1910. at the post office at Annville, Pa., under the act of March 3, 1879. 



LEBANON VALLEY 
DEFEATS HILLMflN 

• I: ' i - .! 

SCORE 42-0 

Hillman Academy, who last year 
trimmed Albright and this year held 
Bucknell to a lower score than Leb- 
anon Valley, met a fate last Satur- 
day which was only just, considering 
the revengeful nature of their op- 
ponents. Ever since the Bucknell 
game, Lebanon Valley has been anx- 
ious to roll up big scores on their op- 
ponents to mak up in a slight way 
for that disastrous defeat. Thus Hill- 
man was forced to record in their 
books a score of 42-0 against them. 

The team from Wilkes-Barre look- 
ed heavy and before the game many 
were in doubt as to the final out- 
come of the contest. No sooner had 
the ball been kicked off, than the 
sidelines saw that L. V. meant busi- 
ness and would give Hillman a good 
run. ( 

From the first down, there was no 
let up until the referee's whistle 
blew, calling the ball dead across 
Hillman's goal line. Plays were run 
off as regular as clockwork and grad- 
ually our adversaries were pushed 
backward. The Varsity showed new 
spirit and new life on all their for- 
mations. Hillman was completely out 
classed and at no time were they 
dangerous. 

In the first quarter, our eleven 
ploughed through the line making 
seventy yards for a touchdown in 
three first downs. Mackert plunged 
through a tackle for the first six 
points. Wheelock kicked this goal 
easily. From this time on, touch- 
downs came regularly and as often 
as the time would permit. C. Snave- 
ly plaved a fine game behind the line 
at fullback, breaking the line for 
consistent eains and tackling deadly. 
Much credit is to be given Snave^y 
for his superior punting. His aver- 
age for nnnts of the game was 39*4 
vqrd*. which is hieh considering the 
sliDDerv ball and the muddy field. 
Tn every game of the season, our 
kicker has out-punted that of our 
orjnonents. 

"Wheelock gained an extra point 
Continued oi pau-e 2 



FRESHMEN DOWN 
SOPHOMORES 

TUG OF WAR. 

The first annual interclass con- 
test, the tug of war, was held last 
Tuesday at 4 o'clock on the Athletic 
field. The challenge was made some 
weeks ago by the Freshmen, and ac- 
cepted by the Sophomores. Arrange- 
ments were made by the Senior- 
Junior counsel so that the contest 
would be a fair one. 

The contest lasted ten minutes, 
having five minute halves, and points 
were scored when one side pulled the 
entire other side over the line. 

Both sides worked hard and much 
spirit was manifested by the non- 
participant members of both classes. 
The first pull was the long one last- 
ing two and one-half minutes, but 
finally the freshmen succeeded in 
pulling their opponents over. There 
were nine pulls during the contest, 
seven of which scored, and all the 
points tallied on the '17 side. 

After the contest Lebanor Valley 
blue and white was in evidence, and 
the class marched to the campus 
carrying the sacred hemp. 

In the evening the freshmen class 
had a banquet, in the Grangers' 
hall, in honor of the fellows who 
had worked faithfully to bring hon- 
or to their class. 



NEW CLOCK. 

The tower clock, which the class 
of 1913 presented to the school, is 
here and is ready to be placed. As 
soon as the firm can send men to 
place it, it will be started and set 
to strike the hours and half hours. 

The "News" will give more par- 
ticulars when the machine is put in 
running condition. 



CALENDAR 

Tuesday Oct. 21, 6 p m. Prayer 
meeting. 

Friday Oct. 24, 7 p. m. Societies. 
Sunday Oct. 26, 1 p. m., Christian 
associations. 



Miss Margaret Myers spent sev- 
eral days at her home in Altoona. 



JUNIORS ENJOY 
MOONLIGHT ILK 

BELLE NUIT! 

That is the expression the Junior 
girls made as they started on their 
hike last Tuesday evening. 

"The moon is shining bright." 
"Come let us take a hike 
This beautiful moonlight night," 
Said Mary Irwin to "little Ike."- 
Belle Orris and Lester Zug 
Were first to start to jog. 
Next, Myra Kiracofe, who nearly- 
ran 

For she was walking with Paul 

Bow-man, 
Vera Myers, the next "stever"' 
Was accompanied by Al Weaver. 
Our dear Junior, Ruth V. Ettgle 
Strolled along with Faber Stengle. 
Ruth E. Engle crossed the stones 
Assisted by gentle Johnny Jones. 
Next Larene Engle and Cotton De~- 

Huff 

I think now I've said enuf. 

The party was chaperoned by Miss 
Ella Brightbill and Mr. Mutch. They 
hiked to the Water Works, where 
they had an enjoyable time toasting 
marshmellows and roasting chestnuts 
over a bun-fire. The Juniors return- 
ed at a reasonable hour in hilarious 
spirits because of the delightful eve- 
ning they had spent together-. 

By a Junior- 



Y. M. C. A. 

The regular weekly Y. M. C. A. 
meeting was conducted on Sunday af- 
ternoon by Mr. D. Leonard Reddick. 
He had the meeting welt planned 
and it was interestingly carried out. 
"Opportunity" was tne loplc under 
discussion. 

Mr. Reddick gave a brief but com- 
prehensive talk on the subject, and' 
then had different members of the 
association follow with talks on dif- 
ferent phases of opportunity as re- 
lated to problems of life. 

Many good points were made that 
will help a person in his work. The 
attendance was good and all express- 
ed themselves as being helped, for 
they can see opportunities now that 
they would have missed. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



College fieuus 



Issued weekly during - the College 
Year by the Students of Lebanon 
Valley College 



EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

R. M. WEIDLER '14 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 
florence mentz '15 
John b. lyter '14 

Social 

ESTA WAREHEIM '16 

Athletics 

PHILO STATTON '15 

Alumni 
PAUL, STRICKLEP. '14 

Music 

RAY P. CAMPBELL 

BUSINESS MANAGER 

HARRY CHARLTON '14 

Subscription Price $1.00 per year 
Single Copies 5 els. 
Clubs of ten, 75 els. 

Address all business communications 

tO HARRY CHARLTON '14 all Other 

matter to Room 22, Adminis ra- 
tion Building Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege, Annville, Pa. 



COLLEGE SPIRIT. 

One of the things needed among 
the students at Lebanon Valley is 
more college spirit, and the right 
kind. Many delude themselves with 
the idea that by going to the ath- 
letic games and cheering themselves 
hoarse, they are showing their col- 
lege spirit. They are. We wouldn't 
have it otherwise, but the trouble is, 
many, altogether too many, let it 
;Stop right there. If a mass meet- 
ing were to be held the evening be- 
fore a game, a dozen students, may- 
be thirteen, might come to rehearse 
the yells and songs. It seems too 
bad that in order to hold a mass 
meeting, it must be done in the din- 
ing hall, directly after a meal, so 
that a fair representation of the stu- 
dent body may be present. 

When there is any work to be 
'done, which it is the students' duty 
to do, it is remarkable how studious 
many become. We never knew that 
there were so many exams, reviews, 
and tests given as the managers of 
the various teams report. When a 
manager wants to find freshmen and 
preps to assist him in doing some 
work, those whom he sees invariably 
have a test or exam the next day. 
Of course the managers are a great 
assistance to the faculty in this way, 
tout strange to say if there were no 
work to be done, those same fresh- 
men could be found playing tennis 
or enjoying themselves in various 
ways with no thought of exams. 



Now we have tried to show above 
what the existing conditions are. 
This is not as it should be. When 
there is work to be done, the best way 
is to do it. Show your college spirit 
by getting out and doing things even 
though they are not as pleasant as 
studying for tests. Some have done 
their duty nobly for Lebanon Valley, 
but a great many more have fallen 
down miserably. If it is impossible 
for some to catch the spirit of things 
for themselves, they might, by a 
course of instruction, be taught. 

We hope that college spirit of the 
right kind will soon hold the place 
that it should in the heart of every 
student, and that every one will do 
all he can for Lebanon Valley, wheth- 
er it is making a touch down in an 
important game, or carrying water. 
If each does his part, the time is 
not far distant when we will have 
a model institution. 



FOOT BALL 



Continued from page 1 



every time the ball was carried a- 
cross, by kicking the goal. Three 
times the ball was kicked out from 
the place it crossed the goal line and 
each time it was in good position for 
the goal. 

The one uninteresting feature of 
the contest was its slowness. Every 
time that Hillman got the ball for 
offensive work, time was wasted in 
every conceivable way. This lost 
time combined with the dampness of 
the day caused the fellows to show 
less signs of "pep" than usual. 
Withal, the team played the best 
footbaU that students of L. V. have 
seen on their home grounds this sea- 
son. 

It is to be hoped that our back- 
field will be in shape for next week's 
game with Washington College, at 
Chestertown, Md. 

Capt. Strickler, who has been on 
the injured list for the past four 
games, expects to be back in time for 
next week. Pell, who has been out 
of the game for the last week, will 
also be in shape by the middle of 
this week. 

Line-up: 

Hillman L. V. 

Weidal L. E E. Snavely 

Dubois L. T Mackert 

Ryan L. G Mickey 

Ward C Von Berghy 

Proudfoot . . . . R. G Hollinger 

Panish R. T DeHuff 

Williams .... R. E Statton 

Theway .... 0. B Lerew 

McCormick . . L. H. B Donahue 

McGroarty . . R. H. B. . .Wheelock 
Sawler .... F. B. . ....... C. Snavely 

Touchdowns — Mackert, Lerew, 2; 
Snavely, Donahue, 2. Goal from 
FeM, Wheelock, 6. Substitutions: — 
Hillman — Williams for Walsh: L. V. 
— Evans for E. Snavely, Wenrick for 



DeHuff, Huber for Wenrick. Referee 
— Barnhardt, U. of M. Umpire — 
Charwick, U. of Chicago. Time of 
Quarters — 10 minutes. 



CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 

Out of the number of young ladies 
of the college who tried for member- 
ship in the Girls' Glee Club, the fol- 
lowing were chosen by Miss Schmidt 
to comprise the club: The Misses 
Catharine Bachman, Louise Henry, 
Mabelle Shanaman, Ruth Strickler, 
Pauline Clark, Lillian Gantz, Edna 
Landis, Mary Wyand, Ella Mutch, 
Vera Myers, Ruth Engle, Josephine 
Urich, Belle Orris, Ruth Brunner, 
Mary Irwin and Mary Painter. The 
club held its initial practice on 
Thursday of last week and organized 
by electing the following officers: 
President, Ruth Engle; Secretary, 
Belle Orris; Treasurer, Vera Myers, 
and Business Manager, Catharine 
Bachman. We believe that the club 
which will represent the college this 
year will prove the best which has 
ever gone out as a representative 
body of singers from the institution. 

The first public recital of the year 
will be given by the students of the 
Conservatory of Music and School of 
Oratory in the chapel of Engle Hall 
on Tuesday evening, October 28th, at 
8.00 P. M. All students of the col- 
lege and the public at large are most 
cordially invited to attend. 

Members of the First Reformed 
church choir, Lebanon, hiked to Ann- 
ville on Wednesday evening, worK- 
ed a surprise on their organist, Prof. 
Sheldon, and enjoyed an oyster sup- 
per at the Eagle Hotel. 

Mr. Earl Eichelberger spent the 
week-end at his home in Oberlin, 
Pa., and incidentally witnessed the 
game between the Steelton vmG Har- 
risburg High Schools at the former 
place on Saturday. 



NEW HAND BOOKS. 

Last Tuesday the "Hand Books" 
were given out to the students at 
chapel. The book this year is larg- 
er than those of former years, a«d 
also has some new features, which 
add to its usefulness and attractive- 
ness. 

New students can make good use 
of this book for it contains much 
that they should know. Read it 
through, learn the songs and yells, 
and conduct yourself as it advises, 
and by so doing you will heap coals 
of fire upon the hoary head of your 
alma mater. 



Miss Florence C. Mentz, who has 
been sick for the past month, is re- 
covering rapidly and will return to 
school this week. Readers of the 
paper, who have missed stories from 
herjpen, will soon be privileged to 
read them again, as she will have 
her place on the staff. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



SOCIETY PROGRAMS 



CLIONIAN. 

Current Events Addie Snyder 

piano Solo Ruth E. Engle 

Debate: Resolved, That the college 
is making good. 

Affirmative — Ruth V. Engle, Mary 

Daugherty. 
Negative — Josephine Urich, Esta 

Wareheim. 

Reading Blanche Risser 

Yocal Solo Katherine Bachman 

Olive Branch Editor 

PHILOKOSMIAN. 

Current Events P. S. Wagner 

"Where to Get Off". .Russell Snavely 
"Benefits of Freshmans Restrictions," 
Jos. Rutherford 
Debate: Resolved, That Governor 
Sultzer's actions justify his impeach- 
ment.. 

Affirmative — J. Arthur Wisner, Carl 
Snavely. 

Negative — Harold Wine, S. Huber 

Heintzelman. 
Harp Duet. . L. B. Zug, D. L. Reddick 
Sketch. ..Lester Zug, Jacob Shenberger 

KALOZETEAN 

Happenings of the week. 

— Harry Gingrich. 
Essay Faber Stengle. 

Chorus Society, 
Debate — Resolved, That all regularly 
matriculated students of L. V. C, 
who are physically able and who are 
not working with athletic squads 
should be required to take two per- 
iods of gymnasium work per week 
throughout the year and should be 
given one hour of college credit for 
this work. 

Affirm. Nes. 
I. S Ernst Willis McNally 

Chas. Loomis Harry Cottlee. 

Vocal Solo Earl Eichelberger 



Y. W. C. A. 

Miss Wareheim and Miss Orris, the 
Y. W. C. A. delegates to Eagles Mere, 
gave their report on Sunday. They 
spoke of the beautiful scenery at 
Eagles Mere, the good fellowship and 
the spiritual blessings which they 
had enjoyed there. They reported 
that they had found the Bible study 
classes especially helpful. 

The most prominent speakers at 
the conference were Mr. Robert E. 
Speer, who made the closing address, 
Rev. Thomas R. White, of Indiana, 
University, Rev. Dr. Mauer, of New 
Haven, Conn., Mr. Robert G. Mac- 
Donald, of Scotland, and Rev. Nolan 
Rice Best. 

The delegates especially enjoyed 
meeting the foreign delegates who 
came to the conference from the con- 
ference at Mohonk. One evening was 
given up to these delegates. They 
told in a very pleasing way of the 
Christian work among the students of 
their respective countries. 

Seventy-four colleges and normal 
schools were represented at the con- 



ference. The total number of stu- 
dents present was 475; these students 
contributed nearly $900 for the work 
of the National Board. 

Conferences like the one at Eagles 
Mere are so helpful and inspiring 
that the Y. W. C. A. hopes to send a 
much larger delegation next year in 
order that it may derive greater 
benefit. 

Miss Wareheim received the first 
prize for the best pictures taken at 
this conference. 



Alumni 



Miss Edna Kilmer, '12, of High 
Bridge, New Jersey, spent Saturday 
at school the guest of Miss Ethel 
Houser. She saw the football game 
in the afternoon, and_ was the guest 
of honor at a party in the evening. 

Mr. E. H. Carmany, '12, is teach- 
ing science in the High School at 
Frostburg, Maryland. 

Mr. Will E. Herr, '07, an assist- 
ant secretary in the Naval Y. M. C. 
A., Norfolk, Va., has been asked by 
the naval department to act as a sec- 
retary on one of the cruising battle- 
ships. The fleet is to visit Europe 
by way of the Mediterranean, stop- 
ping at all the principal sea ports, 
and trips are to be made to large 
inland cities. The trip is a reward 
to enlisted men for faithful service. 

Mr. Herr spent a few days in 
town last week preparing for the 
trip. 

Mr. R. D. Burtner, 1900, western 
agent for the Narragansett Machine 
Co., of Providence, R. I., was here 
last week and contracted for the 
work of equiping our new gymna- 
sium. Mr. Burtner is an athlete of 
note having graduated from the Chi- 
cago Physical Training School and 
having served as assistant physical 
director in the Y. M. C. A. at Day- 
ton, Ohio. 

Prof. H. H. Baish, '01, superin- 
tendent of the Altoona schools, has 
planned and put into execution a 

Journal Publishing Co. 

Printers 



Main Street 



Annville, Pa. 



RAH! RAH! BOYS EAT 

Raw Oysters at "Ussy's" 

OR EAT 'EM STEWED OR FRIED JUST AS 
YOU REFER 



You are correct if you get your 

LADIES 1 and GENTS' 
FURNISHINGS 

At KINPORTS', Annville, Pa. 

Students' Discount Packard & Radcliffc Shoes 

W. D. ELLIOTT 
Shoemaker 

Repairing ncately done. Rubber work a 
specialty. 

Patronage Solicited 
Main St, Annville, Pa. 

LIVERY 

First Class Teams to 
Hire 
Parties* a SpsciaJty 

H. F\ LONG & SON 
Rear Eagle Hotel Annville, F"a 

WM. WALTZ 
Hair Cutting and Shaving 
Saloon 

W. Main St. Annville, Pa 

For Cakes and Confectionery 

GO TO 



Bowman's Bakery 

A FULL SUPPLY OF HALL'S CHOCO* 
LATES. ALWAYS FRESH 

W. Main St. Annville, Pa. 



A. S. MILLER 



W. MAIN ST. 



Home-Wade Noodles, Peanut Butter 

H. B. FLOWERS 

Manufacturer of 

' Flower Brand" Potato 
Chips 

LEBANON, PA. 

To the Students of 

Lebanon Valley College 
Greeting 

Mr. J. G. Jones, representing the 
Photographic Department of Dives; 
Pomeroy & Stewart. Reading-, Pa., 
extends a hearty invitation to the en- 
tire membership of the College an^ 
their friends, to call at ROOM NO. 14. 
Administration Building, and inspect 
the latest and best of the Photographic 
Art. As Mr. Jone's time is limited to 
Friday he asks that you call at your 
earliest convenience and select your 
choice of styles. We first, last and for 
all time guarantee you satisfaction. 
Yours 

DIVES, POMEROY" & STEWART 
• Per J. G. Jones 



COLLEGE NEWS 



GO TO IT BOYS 



ITS 



Russ Brothers 
Velvet Ice Cream 



AT 



USSY'S" 



A. S. MILLER, W. Main St. 

o£ebanon l/ailey 
College 

First Class Faculty. 
Group System. 

Special Facilities in Chemist* y 

and Biology 
Music, Art, Oratory 

Ladies in the Hall are under the con- 
slant care of the Preceptress. 

Write for catalogue 

ttev. S. *D. Sossardj iPrest'e/eni 
jtnnviile, !Pa, 



WINDSOR HOTEL 

W. T. BRUBAKER, Manager. 
European, (1.00 per day and up 
American, $2.50 per day and up 




Midway between Broad Street 
Station and Reading Terminal 
on Filbert StreeS. 

The only moderate priced hotel of 
reputation and consequence in 

PHILADELPHIA 



self-sustaining basis, a cafeteria. 
This is the only High School in the 
United States that maintains a lunch 
department which shows a profit 
over and above the cost of mainte- 
nance. More than that the depart- 
ment has almost paid for us equip- 
ment. There are 1,5 00 students fed 
daily, twelve minutes is the time 
needed to serve them, and the price 
of the meal averages from 7 % to 
10 cents. 

Prof. Baish is doing a great work 
in Altoona, and it is due to his splen- 
did executive ability that that city 
schools are moving toward the front. 

Prof, and Mrs. S. O. Grimm and 
son, Henry, spent the week end at 
Mr. Grimm's home in Red Lion, 
York Co., Pa. 

Mrs. Sara Strickler Eachman, Con- 
servatory '12, returned home last 
week from her honeymoon to Niaga- 
ra Falls, Buffalo, Rochester, and 
points of interest along the way. 
Mr. and Mrs. Bachman occupied their 
new home on Walnut street, Leba- 
non, immediately upon their arrival. 

Ivan L Ressler, '13, has fitted out 
a chemical laboratory in his home at 
Shamokin and is doing original re- 
search work in chemical analysis. 

Charles Y. Ulrich, '13, visited his 
Alma Mater last week, the guest of 
Victor M. Heffelfinger. 

Elmer L. Haak, '92, of Myerstown, 
attended the Sunday school conven- 
tion at Williamsport last week. 
Vote for J. P. Batdorf, '99, for Prothonotary 



Patronize the 



jj^Jtems of Interest J 

J. Allen Walter '14 refereed the 
Lebanon High-Stevens game at Leb- 
anon on Saturday. 

Miss Blance Risser '14 who was ill 
at her home in Campbelltown last 
week, has returned to school. 

Prof. H H. Shenk was Lebanon 
Valley's representative at the inaug- 
uration of Pres. George L. Omwake, 
of Ursinus College. Prof. Shenk and 
Pres. Omwake were classmates at col- 
lege. 

Mr. and Mrs. Arnold, of Lickdale, 
visited their son, Fred, last Tuesday. 
They also witnessed the Sophomore- 
Freshmen tug of war. 

Messrs. Harry Kleffman and Huber 
Heintzelman spent Sunday at their 
homes in Chambersburg. 

Miss Mary Daugherty and Miss 
Josephine Mathias spent Jthe week- 
end at Miss Daugherty's home in Co- 
lumbia. 

Dr. Gossard and his family return- 
ed to their home on Thursday even- 
ing. They attended the conference 
at Greencastle and visiting Dr. Gos- 
sard's parents. 



Academy Tailor 

DAVID B. BASHOF*E 



Clothing Called for 
and Returned 



Academy Bid g 
Poom 18 



D. B. SHIFFER 
GRADUATE OPTICIAN 

Eyes Examined, Glasses Fitted, Broken 
Lenses Replaced, anything in 
the Optical line 



East Main St 



ANNVILLE 



You get only the best at 

COL LAM'S 



Quantity ✓ * ✓ Quality 
Main Street 




Standard Quality 

There is no quicksand more un'* 
stable than poverty in quality and 
we avoid this quicksand by standard 
quality. 

Tennis, Golf. Base Ball, Cricket, Foot Balh 
Basket Ball, Athletic Equipment. 
Catalogue Free. 

A. G. SPALDING L BROS. 



-30 Nassau St. 



25 W. 42d St. 



NEW YORK 



M.F. Batdorf sSon 

Ladies' and Gents' 
Furnishings 



Main Street 



Annville 



JOS. MILLER 

FURNITURE 
and UNDERTAKING 



West Main Street 



Annville, Pa. 



JACOB SARGENT 



MERCHANT 
TAILOR 

READY-TO WEAR CLOTHING 

Main Street Annville 

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 

% SCHOOL of VV 
«t% ENGINEERING 

CIVIL MECHANICAL, ELECTRICAL and CHEMICAL 
ENGINEERING, and GENERAL SCIENCE 

Send for a Catalogue. TROY, N.Y. 



COIiliEC^ flEWS 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



Voluma V. Annville, Pa., Tuesday, October 28, 1913 No. 7 

Entered as second-class matter November U. 1910. at the post office at Annville, I'a., under the act of March 3, 1879. 



DR. GOSSARD TALKS LEBANON VALLEY SENIORS ESTAB- 
ATLQCALINS1ITUTE WINS HARD GAME LISA PRECEDENT 



The Lebanon County Teachers'- In- 
stitute which was held in Lebanon 
last week, was favored by having 
our president, Dr. G. D. Gossard, de- 
liver an address on "Practical Edu- 
cation." 

He spoke of the necessity of edu- 
cation by affirming that it was a 
necessity, not a luxury. Education 
is for more than preachers, and the 
idea of Christianity and education 
being antipodal is past. If a per- 
son wants to succeed he must have 
a capacity for play as well as for 
work and a little fight mixed in will 
help in the struggle for a better 
existence. 

The president's remarks were very 
plain and true, and the teachers felt 
they could take his message witn 
them, for it was the result of a wide 
knowledge and experience, and not 
a conglomeration of idealistic edu- 
cational theories. 



Y. M. C. A. 

Mr. Olewiler led the Y. M. C. A. 
meeting on Sunday afternoon, "Ways 
of Improving Our Y. M. C. A.," was 
his subject. He spoke of several 
ways by which we could improve our 
association, and then conducted a 
general discussion. The meeting was 
both interesting and helpful, for it 
opened our eyes to our responsibili- 
ties and opportunities. 

Following the regular meeting a 
business meeting was held. At this 
meeting it was decided to have our 
association represented at the Kan- 
sas City convention, and plans were 
made whereby this could be accom- 
plished. Here is a chance for all 
to help in a good cause, so do what 
you can. 



S0PHR0NEAN. 

Pen Points Walter Deibler 

Piano Solo Harry Katerman 

Debate — Resolved, That Sophronean 

attendance should be Compulsory. 
Affirmative— C. L. Boughter, Chas. 

Gimmil. 

Negative— Harold Wrightstone, Irv- 
mg Reber. 

Sketch { R p - McClure 
1 D. B. Basehore 
Live Wire Editor 



Lebanon Valley won its fourth 
consecutive game this season, by de- 
feating Washington college at 
Chestertown, Md. Our team covet- 
ed the pig skin at its first appear- 
ance on the field and so it found its 
way, which was a tiresome one from 
the eastern shore of Maryland to the 
beautiful Lebanon Valley. The foot- 
ball which was carried across Wash- 
ington's goal twice by blue and 
white players, now rests in the L. 
V. trophy case with a 14 to score 
painted upon it. 

The team left Annville, 11.06 on 
Friday morning and after traveling 
all afternoon arrived in the Mary- 
land town. Rain had been falling 
since early morning and promised a 
muddy field upon which the game 
was to be played. Immediately be- 
fore the contest started the down- 
pour ceased and allowed the two 
teams to play, they being hampered 
only by the muddy field. 

From the very start L. V. took the 
offensive, receiving Washington's 
kick off and running it back to the 
middle of the field. On account of 
the wet ball and soggy condition of 
the ground, progress toward the goal 
was slow. During the entire first 
quarter, it was "nip and tuck" in 
the center of the field. However, at 
the beginning of the second period, 
rushes went better and within two 
minutes we were in position for our 
first touchdown. Mackert carried the 
ball for a run of fifteen yards 
through the opposing line and put 
the ball on the one yard line. The 
elastic qualities of Mackert's figure 
did their utmost to put the ball 
across the line, but in vain. 

On the next rush, Capt. Strick- 
ler took the ball across the goal 
line. Wheelock kicked the goal 
easily, as the ball was in good posi- 
tion. Lebanon Valley then kicked 
off to their opponents, who failed to 
run the ball back more than two or 
three yards. Washington could do 
nothing through the L. V. line, and 
after three downs was forced to 
kick. Our team took the ball and 
on two first downs added another 
six points to their score. Wheelock 
Continued on pa^e 2 



Thursday was an epoch making 
day in the history of Lebanon Valley 
College. It was on that memorable 
day that the senior class laid aside 
their dignity, and showed their love 
for their Alma Mater by taking up 
shovels, picks and hoes, and con- 
structing two new tennis courts. 

This work has been "hanging fire" 
since school began. No progress was 
being made toward the completion 
of the courts, so finally the senior 
class, at the suggestion of Coach 
Guyer and under his efficient leader- 
ship* did the work. Thursday was 
the day selected for the work, and 
the faculty very kindly excused all 
seniors from classes on that day. At 
eight o'clock in the morning every 
member of the class, who was able, 
reported to Coach Guyer for work. 
Some removed the sod, some hauled 
it away, while others leveled the 
courts. The work went on mer- 
rily until about ten o'clock when the 
fair co-eds of the class served a 
lunch, consisting of oyster sand- 
wiches, cocoa and celery to their 
class brothers. Again in the after- 
noon a most delicious lunch was serv- 
ed. Too much credit cannot be giv- 
en to these fair members of the 
class of '14 for their part in the work. 

The work is not quite complete. 
All of the sod has been removed, and 
one of the courts is ready to be lined. 
The other will require a little more 
leveling and rolling. This work will 
be completed just as soon as the 
ground becomes dry enough. 



CALENDAR 

Tuesday, Oct. 28, 6 p. m. — Prayer 
meeting, 7 p. m. Students' recital. 

Wednesday, Oct. 2 9, 7 p. m. — Ath- 
letic Board meeting, 7.30 p. m.; 
Mathematical Round Table. 

Friday, Oct. 31, 7 p. m., Philo 
Hallowe'en party. 

Saturday, Nov. 1 — Football game. 
Lebanon Valley xvs. Muhlenburg, at 
Allentown. 

Sunday, Nov. 2, 1 p. m., Christian 
Associations. 



Prof. H. H. Shenk will deliver a 
lecture at Jonestown on Saturday. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



College fleuis 



Issued weekly during the College 
Year by the Students of Lebanon 
Valley College 



EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

R. M. WEIDLER '14 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 
florence mentz '15 
John b. lyter '14 

Social 
ESTA WAREHEIM '10 

Athletics 

PHILO STATTON '15 

Alumni 

PAUL STRICKLEP. '14 

Music 

RAY P. CAMPBELL '10 

BUSINESS MANAGER 

HARRY CHARLTON '14 

Subscription Price S1.00 per year 
Single Copies $ cts. 
• Clubs of ten, 75 cts. 



Address all business communications 

to HARRY CHARLTON '14 all Other 

matter to Room 22, Adminis' ra- 
tion Building Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege, Annville, Pa. 



EDITORIAL. 

Have we, as a college, ever won- 
dered how others see us, have we 
every thought how many people are 
watching us, and are we conscious 
that our every action counts for or 
against us? 

Ours is one of the smaller colleges 
of the state, and as such we are try- 
ing to do our best to get into the 
public lime light and rank with and 
surpass our neighbors. We see a 
goal before us and we are straining 
every effort to reach that goal; we 
know our past and when its ghost 
haunts us we, in madness, are driven 
forward toward that better end. But 
as we go, do we ever consider that 
our frenzy might be foolishness to 
the spectator and our labors are in 
vain? 

We believe that good athletics help 
a college; but that poor athletics ridi- 
cule it. That is the reason we are 
making an effort to place a good foot- 
ball team on the field. But do we 
not feel that our duty ends with the 
support of the team, and forget what 
remains for us to do. 

Why is it that men, who are sup- 
ported by the church, have been edu- 
cated by the church in our church 
school, and who have contributed to 
the support of our own school, send 
their sons and daughters to non-co- 
education schools to have them 
trained for their life's work? Why 
is it that men who say they are in- 
n-rested in L. V. C, that contribute 



to her support in a financial way win 
not contribute to her by sending their 
sons or daughters here? These are 
hard questions to answer and they 
need thought, but this reason has 
been given by some members of the 
church in the co-operating territory. 
They say, "Lebanon Valley College 
students do not conduct themselves 
properly." Is this untrue and are we 
willing to rest under this accusa- 
tion; or is it true and are we will- 
ing to let it be a hinderance to our 
progress? If that is the reason lor 
our friends sending their sons ana 
daughters to other schools, it is time 
for us to conduct ourselves in a bet- 
ter fashion. 

We admit that the people in the 
surrounding territory know very lit- 
tle about our student life, but why 
is it that when they learn anything 
about us it is of the worst nature. 
Do we conduct ourselves better while 
at school than away from her, or is 
the student body as a whole judged 
by the actions of a few? If it is the 
few, let us correct them; and if it is 
all of us, let us change at once, for 
things that have been said about 
us should never be repeated again. 

Let us conduct ourselves from this 
time on feeling that we are either a 
hindrance or a help to our school, 
and if we keep that view of conduct 
uppermost in our minds, nothing can 
be said that will hurt our school. 



FOOT BALL 



Continued from page 1 

ran the ball at this time for thirty 
yards through the entire opposing 
eleven and fell with three tackles 
across the line. Spectators say that 
they had never before seen a prettier 
run that that made oy "Chief. 
Side-stepping, dodging and plunging 
he made the touchdown after a won- 
derful run. 

During the second half, the Wash- 
ington eleven took a brace and held 
cur team from further crossing the 
goal line. Failing in end runs and 
straight line bucks, they tried by 
forward passes to get the points 
which wculd have turned the score. 
The entire third and fcurth periods 
were spent within the two thirty 
yard lines. 

The team played a steady game,' 
keeping Washington on the defen- 
sive three fourths of the time. The 
Marylanders were credited with 
three first downs during the forty- 
eight minutes of play. Wheelock was 
easily the star of the game, and It 
wag his running which the opposing 
team dreaded most. Strickler was 
back in the game at quarterback 
and called signals with his old-time 
'pep.' Mickey at guard has been 
playing a steady game the entire 
season, going into every game and 
battling successfully against men his 
superior in weight. Lerew played a 
good game at left end and strength- 



ened his side of the line materially. 

Coach Guyer was especially pleas- 
ed with the victory, for it came on 
a day which marked his advent into 
this world.. The fellows seemed to 
play harder, knowing that they were 
helping in the celebration of a birth- 
day. 

Washington L. V. 

Lewis L. E Lerew 

Healey L. T Mackert 

Garret L. G Mickey 

Strong C Von Bereghy 

Branham . . . . R. G Hollingev 

Meridith R. T Station 

Wallace R. E Snavely 

Mocre Q. B Strickler 

pfiteh L. H. B Donahue 

Sarmore . . . . R. H. B Wheelock. 

Biddle F. B Pell 

Touchdowns — Strickler, Wheelock. 
Goal from touchdown — Wheelock, 
2. Substitutes — L. V. — Wenrick for 
Hollinger, W. Lcng for Healey, Davis 
for Wallace. Referee — Borter, 11. of 
M. Umpire — Jones, U. of M. Time 
Of quarters — 12 minutes. 

OPEN DATE FILLED 

Manager Snavely nas completed 
arrangements for the filling of the 
open date, Nov. 15. A game with 
Catholic University, of Washington, 
D. C, is now on the schedule and 
bids fair to add to the list of 
victories. Below is the schedule 
with the games played and those 
coming: 

Sept. 24 — Carlisle Indian School, 

Carlisle, Pa. 

Lost, 2G-0 
Sept. 27 — Penbrook Ag. college, 

Annville. 

Won, 2 7-0 
Oct. 4 — Bucknell, Lewisburg. 
Lost, 46 — 0. 

Oct. 11 — Pierce Bus. College, Ann- 
ville. 

Won, 68-0 

Oct. 18 — Hillman Academy, Ann- 
ville. 

Won, 42-0 
Oct. 25 — Washington College, Ches- 
ter-town, Md. 

Wen, 14-0. 
Nov. 1 — Muhlenburg, Allentown. 
Nov. 8 — Dickinson, Carlisle. 
Nov. 15 — Catholic Univ., Washing- 
ton, D. C. 

Nov. 22 — Carlisle Indian School Sec- 
ends, Annville, Pa. 



The Hebron U. B. church at Leb- 
anon dedicated a line new bell on 
Sunday, Oct. 26th. The bell was 
gotten through the efforts or me 
pastor, Rev. O. T. Ehrhart, '11, and 
serves as another reminder to the 
general church of his efficient work. 

Pres. G. D. Gossard preached the 
sermon and conducted the dedicatory 
services on Sunday night. The ser- 
vice was interesting and impressive, 
and all present were pleased and 
helped. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC. 

The first of the regular monthly 
:student recital classes was held on 
Monday afternoon, October 20th, at 
4.00 p. m. in the chapel of the Con- 
servatory. The students first elected 
the following officers for the ensuing 
year: President, Mr. Fred Arnold; 
Vice-President, Mr. Harry Bender; 
Secretary, Miss Luella Hertzler, and 
Treasurer, Miss Kathryn Kreider. 
After the newly-elected President 
and Secretary had taken their re- 
spective chairs the recital program 
was carried out in which the follow- 
ing took part: Misses Mabelle Shana- 
man, Mary Painter, Ruth Strickler, 
Ada Bossard, Mary Wyand and Lu- 
(ella Hertzler; Messrs. Faber Stengle, 
Harry Bender, Ray Campbell and P. 
M. Linebaugh. The program was 
varied and interesting and performed 
in a creditable and pleasing manner 
to the great enjoyment of all pres- 
ent. 

Four new students have recently 
been added to the enrollment of the 
Conservatory. They are Eva Speraw, 
Martha Newgard, Dorothy Sholly 
and Mr. Gardiner Savior all of Ann- 
ville. 

Miss Sara Thomas has been ill for 
the past week at her home in Avon. 
The speedy recovery to her former 
health is hoped for by ner many 
friends at the Conservatory. 

Miss Mary Spangler, of Lebanon, 
was obliged to be absent from her 
•classes for a week on account of her 
eyes. 

Mr. P. M. Linebaugh returned Mon- 
day from a short visit to his home 
in York, Pa. 

Miss Gertrude K. Schmidt, our 
vocal instructor, appeared as soloist 
on the October musicale program at 
the First Reformed church, Lebanon, 
Sunday evening, Oct. 29. 

Mr. H. M. Bender also assisted the 
•choir, which is under the direction 
•of Prof. E. Edwin Sheldon, organist. 



THE TEACHERS ENTERTAIN. 

Miss Johnson, Miss Adams, Miss 
Schmidt, and Miss Seltzer gave an af- 
ternoon tea for a number of their 
friends in the parlors of the Wom- 
■en's Dormitory on Saturday from 
three to six o'clock. The parlors 
were made more homelike by the 
use of potted plants, a table electric 
light, and sofa cushions. Refresh- 
ments were served in the back par- 
lor. The guests brought their sew- 
ing and spent a very pleasant after- 
noon with the teachers, who are 
chsrming hostesses. The hostesses 
were very glad that Miss Richardson, 
the Y. W. C. A. student secretary, 
was here at this time, and that they 
had the pleasure of entertaining her 
with their other guests. 

The guests were Mesdames Gos- 
«ard, Lehman, Shenk, Coover, Krei- 
tfer, Meyer and Brightbill and Miss 
Richardson, 



Y. W. C. A. 

On Sunday afternoon Miss Larene 
Engle, vice president of the associa- 
tion, presided at the meeting and 
Miss Richardson gave a very help- 
ful and interesting address to the 
girls. Her subject was the "Differ- 
ent Kinds of Christians." She men- 
tioned the five following classes of 
Christians: "Formal, Inherited, 
Emotional, Pharasaical and Willing 
Christians." She asked the girls to 
decide which kind of Christians they 
wished to be. The address was 
straightforward and sincere, and 
should help each girl who heard it 
to live a more earnest Christian life. 
Misses Johnson, Adams and Schmidt 
were present, and a large number of 
girls. 

After this service Miss Richardson 
held a conference with the Y. W. C. 
A. cabinet. Previous to this she had 
met each committee chairman and 
outlined some lines of work for each 
one. The association is very fortu- 
nate in having an earnest Christian 
like Miss Richardson for its student 
secretary and in having her come to 
visit it so early in the year. Now 
that the president, Miss Mentz, has 
returned the work of the association 
should go forward in earnest. 



Patronize the 



CAMPUS NOTES. 

The Sophomores and Freshmen had 
a little tussle last Thursday. The 
Freshmen feigned banquet sickness. 

"Cotton" DeHuff, L. V.'s best de- 
fensive tackle, is out on crutches now 
and will soon be in the game again. 

The football team was given a 
good send-off last Friday, and on 
Sunday when they came home with 
the pig-skin demonstration was not 
lacking. 

Coach Guyer appreciated the hand- 
some 14-0 present that his football 
team gave him on his birthday, Sat- 
urday, Oct. 25th. 

Posters are out now for the first 
Star Course. Do not forget Novem- 
ber the fifth. 

The football team spent most of 
Sunday in bed. 

Remember the Hallowe'en party on 
Friday night. 



ALUMNI. 

Miss Catharine Hershey, of Her- 
shey, a former member of the class 
of 1912, left last week for Madison, 
Wis., to take a place on the staff of 
the Wisconsin State Journal. Miss 
Hershey was graduated from the de- 
partment of journalism of Wisconsin 
State University last year, and af- 
terward did general reportorial work 
for the Harrisburg Telegraph. Bright 
and clever, with a keen news sense 
and untiring energy, Miss Hershey 
is sure to succeed in her new posi- 
tion. 

Miss Hershey, while at school here, 
was a member of the "News" staff 
and we wish to congratulate her on 
her new position. 



Academy Tailor 

DAVID B. BASHO^E 



Clothing Called for 
and Returned 



Academy Bldg 
Room 18 



D. B. 5HIFFER 
GRADUATE OPTICIAN 

Eyes Examined, Glasses Fitted, Broken 
Lenses Replaced, anything in 
the Optical line 

East Main St ANNVILLE 



You get only th» hzst at 

COLLAM'S 

Quantity ✓ ✓ ✓ Quality 
Main Street 




Standard Quality 

There is no quicksand more un' 
stable than poverty in quality and 
we avoid this quicksand by standard 
quality, 

Tennis, Golf, Base Ball, Cricket, Foot Ball, 
Basket Ball, Athletic Equipment, 
Catalogue Free, 

A. G, SPALDING & BROS, 



30 Nissau St. 25 Hi 5; 



M.F.Batdorf sSon 

Ladies' nnd Gents' 
Furnishings 



Main Street 



Annvill-; 



JOS. MILLER 

FURNITURE 
and UNDERTAKING 



West Main Street 



Annville, Pa- 



JACOB SARGENT 



MERCHANT 
TAILOR 

READY-TO WEAR CLOTHING 
Main Street Annville 

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 

% SCHOOL of \\ 
'4% ENGINEERING 

CIVIL MECHANICAL, ELECTRICAL and CHEMICAL 
ENGINEERING, and GENERAL SCIENCE 

Send for a Catalogue. TROY, N.Y. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



GO TO IT BOYS 



ITS 



Russ Brothers 
Velvet Ice Cream 



AT 



"USSY'S" 

A. S. MILLER, W. Main St. 

xjCebanon 7/ alley 
College 

First Class Facility. 
Group System. 

Special Facilities in Chemistry 

and Biology 
Music, Art, Oratory 

Ladies in the Hall are under the con- 
stant care of the Preceptress. 

Write for catalogue 
ttev. S. <D. Sossaretj SPres/e/ent 



WINDSOR HOTEL 

W. T. BRUBAKER, Manager. 
European, $1.00 per day and up 
American, $2.50 per day and up 



§ . (fee, 





Midway between Broad Street 
Station and Reading Terminal 
on Filbert Street 

The only moderate priced hotel of 
reputation and consequence in 

PHILADELPHIA 



Prcf. 0. P. Butterwick, '12, was 
the referee at the Hershey-Penbrook 
game. 

Miss Edith M. Lehman, '13, of 
Royersford, spent Sunday in Annville 
with her parents. 

Miss Estella Stehman, '96, of 
Mountville, visited friends in town 
last week. 



PERSONALS. 

Rev. O. E. Krenz, of Dillsburg, vis- 
ited school last week. 

Mr. L. W. Bridegam and Mr. ana 
Mrs. G. A. Shofestall, of Reading, 
visited our school last week. 

Rev. M. H. Jones, of Paradise, 
spent Monday at school visiting his 
son, John. 

Mr. W. T. Evans, of Lykens, stop- 
ped to see his son, David, for a few 
hours on Wednesday. 

Rev. C. E. Boughter, of Oberlin, 
visited his son last Monday. 

Miss Josephine Mathias spent Sun- 
day at her home in Highspire. 

Messrs. Mutch and Uhrich visited 
the Pennsylvania Steel Plant at 
Steelton last Monday. They report 
having had a very profitable and in- 
teresting time, for they saw all the 
interesting parts of the plant. 

Mr. S. D. Clark, manager of the 
Hershey Store Company, Hershey, 
Pa., visited the school last Thurs- 
day. 

Mrs. G. H. Kirkland, of Bambridge, 
N. Y., visited her son, Prof. R. Mac 
D. Kirkland last week. 

Prof. J. E. Lehman is confined to 
his home because of sickness. 

Miss Eleanor Richardson, student, 
Y. W. C. A. secretary, was the guest 
of the association here from Friday 
until Monday. Miss Richardson was 
here in the interest of the Y. W. C. 
A. work and of the Kansas City Stu- 
dent Volunteer Convention. 

The Y. W. C. A. held an informal 
reception for Miss Richardson on 
Saturday night. About twenty-five 
persons were present. 

Isaac B. Haak, a trustee of Leba- 
non Valley College, and the contract- 
tor, who is building the labratories 
at Albright college, sent his foreman 
to Annville to get ideas for his work 
at Myerstown. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. M. Runkle and 
Dr. and Mrs. J. A. Lyter, of Har- 
risburg, were the guests of Tom and 
John Lyter last Wednesday after- 
noon. 

Miss Ruth Huber spent the week 
ml at her her home near Lair as er 



RAH! RAH! BOYS EAT 

Raw Oysters at "Ussy's" 

OR EAT 'EM STEWED OR FRIED JUST AS 
YOU REFER 



You are correct if you get your 

LADIES' and GENTS 1 
FURNISHINGS 

At KINPORTS', Annville, Pa. 

Students' Discount Packard & Radclilfc Shoes- 

W. D. ELLIOTT 
Shoemaker 

Repairing neately done. Fubtcr woik a> 
specially. 

Patronage Solicited 
Main St. Annville, Pa- 

LIVERY 

First Class Teams to 
Hire 

Parties a Specialty 
H. F\ LONG & SON 

Rear Kajrle Hotel Annville, Pa 

WM. WALTZ 
Hair Cutting and Shaving 
Saloon 



W. Main St. 



Annville, Pa 



For Cakes and Confectionery 

GO TO 

Bowman's Bakery 

A FULL SUPPLY OF HALL'S CHOCO- 
LATES. ALWAYS FRESH 

W. Main St. Annville, Pa. 



Home-Made Noodles, Peanut Butter 

H. B. FLOWERS 

Manufacturer of 

' Flower Brand" Potato 
Chips 

LEBANON. PA. 



DIVES, 

POMEROY 
& STE 




A. S. MILLER 



W. MAIN ST. 



READING, PA 



COIiliEGE HEWS 

LEBANON VALLEY^GOLLEGE 



Volume V. Annville, Pa., Tuesday., riovei.. '94,3 

Entered as second-class matter November 12, 1910, at the postofllee at Annville, Ha., underthe 



No. 8 




IE BIG 
EN PARTY 



On Friday evening the Philokos- 
mian Literary Society gave their an- 
nual Hallowe'en party. The guests 
were instructed to assemble in the 
chapel before 7.15. At that time two 
wierd ghost-like figures carrying Hal- 
lowe'en lanterns, marched slowly 
down the center aisle of the chapel, 
and in deep hollow voices command- 
ed. the guests to follow. They walk- 
ed slowly out of the chapel, follow- 
ed by the crowd who walked In pairs. 
After a delightful walk which cov- 
ered a large part of town, the guides 
led the way to the Granger's Hall. 
They entered, followed by all, just as 
the children followed the Pied Piper 
of Hamelin into the mountain, the 
doors closed, but unlike the unfortu- 
nate children who followed the Piper, 
those who followed the ghost like 
guides were heard from again. 

The large hall was beautifully 
decorated with corn and lanterns. 
One corner of the room was given 
over to the gypsy fortune tellers, who 
told the present, past, and future 
without clamoring for the usual fee. 
In another corner there was a piano, 
around which parties gathered 
throughout the evening to sing col- 
lege songs and rag times. Noise 
making instruments were much in 
evidence, and a clog dance by one of 
the ghosts was a leading event of 
the evening. Confetti! yes, confetti 
was everywhere. The person who 
did not carry away at least a quart 
cf tl;e small particles was to be 
Pitied, for, he, evidently had not been 
iu many of the confetti battles. 

Refreshments consisting of pump- 
kin pie, apples, and doughnuts were 
served, and a keg of orangeade was 
°n tap throughout the evening. This 
Place claimed the attention of many 
who frequently wended their way in 
that direction. 

At an early hour the party broke 
UP, all affirming that they had an 
excellent time, and regreting the 

early hour at which they were com- 
pelled to leave. 



"FEEDS" 

"Feeds" have been in order at the 
different tables in the college din- 



ing room for the past few weeks. 
Among those who have a'ready in- 
dulged were Prof. Grimm's table, 
Miss Schmidt's table, Miss Adam's, 
Mr. Weidler's and Mr. Charlton's 
tables. 

During the past week two very 
elaborate affairs were given on (he 
same evening. They were given at 
Miss Seltzer's and Mr. Reddick's 
tables . Miss Seltzer was presented 
with a beautiful hunch of chrysan- 
themums which adorned the center 
of the table. A chicken dinner was 
served. Mr. Reddick's tab^ was dec- 
orated with candles and autumn 
leaves. The menu consisted of fruit 
salad, creamed tomato soup, roasted 
chicken, peas, mashed potatoes, cel- 
ery, cranberry sauce, gillet sauce, ice 
cream, cake and candy. Pretty Hal- 
lowe'en place cards were used and 
Mr. Reddick was given a doll be- 
cause he is always talking about 
"Damsels," which f s Uis name for 
damson preserves. 



MATHEMATICAL ROUND TABLE. 

The Mathematical Round Table 
had its first program for the year 
on Wednesday, October 29th. The 
program was as follows: 
Archimedes (paper) . .A. H. Kleffman 
Individual Methods of Teaching 

Mathematics, 
Pro, — Miss "fylyra Kiracofe. Con, — 

F. E. Stengle. 
Discussion. 

The program was interesting and 
profitable. 

Mr. Williams, Mr. Kleffman, Mr. 
Shonk, Mr. Edwin Zigler and Miss 
Ruth Huber were elected to member- 
ship in the Round Table. 

The following officers were elect- 
ed for the first semester: President, 
Mr. R. Weidler; vice-president, Mr. 
Faber Stengle; secretary, Miss Esta 
Wareheim; treasurer, Mr. R. W. Wil- 
liams. 

The next meeting of the Round 
Table will be held on November 19th. 



CHAFING-DISH FARTY. 

The following persons enjoyed a 
chafing-dish party on Saturday 
night: Misses Lillian Hummer, of 
Manheim; Luella Hurtzler, Joseph- 
ine Mathias, Myra Kiracofe and 
Ethel Houser; Messrs. Oleweiler, 
Smith, Ness, Harnish, and Vinton 
Bowen from Baltimore. The party 
was given in honor of Miss Hummer, 
who was a guest of Miss Hurtzler and 
Mr. Bowen, who is Miss Houser's 
cousin. 




GIVE RECITAL 



The first students' evening recital 
of the year was given on Tuesday, 
October 28th in the Engle Auditor- 
ium. It was largely attended and 
the audience was very appreciative 
and attentive during the perform- 
ance of the entire program. 

The first number of the program 
was a two-piano piece, "Tannhauser 
March" by Wagner. It was capably 
rendered by Messrs. R. P. Campbell 
and P. M. Linebaugh. 

This was followed by Grieg's "But- 
terfly" which was played in a very 
charming and graceful manner by 
Miss Luella Herzler. 

"Grande Polka de Concert" — Bart- 
lett, by Miss Mabelle Shanaman 
showed careful preparation on the 
part of Miss Shanam.m and was on? 
of the most enoyable numbers of the 
program. 

Miss Ruth V. Strickler then de- 
lighted the audienc? with a vocal 
polo entitled "Oh del mio dolce ar- 
dor" by Gluck. 

Mr. Li. Clarence Bar-net proved 
himself a capable pianist by his ex- 
cellent interpretation of "Marcel" by 
Godard. 

The next number a composition of 
WollenhauDt. — "Whispering Winds" 
was artisticaUy rendered by Miss 
Mabel Bensinsr. 

Reinhold's "Impromptu Op. 2 8 No. 
2" by Miss Mary L. Light was anoth- 
er pleasing number and was followed 
by "Dearest" — Homer, sung in a rich 
voice by Miss Mabelle Shanaman. 

The next two numbers were: 
"Novellette. Op. 21 . .o. 5 — "Schee- 
mann, by Miss Mary Painter and 
"Valse de V eventail" — Poldini, by 
Mr. J. Fred Arnold. Though ex- 
tremely difficult they were both 
rendered in an easy and artistic man- 
ner. 

The last number of the program 
was a sketch entitled "A Pair of 
Lunatics" by Miss Josephine Urich 
and Mr. Verling Jamison. The 
characters kept the audience in an 
almost continuous convulsion of 
lauerhter and interpreted their parts 
in the most pleasing manner poss'ble, 
much to the enjoyment of all in at- 
tendance. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



College J^euis 



Issued weekly during- the College 
Year by the Students of Lebanon 
Valley College 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

R. M. WEIDLER '14 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 
florknck mentz '15 
John b. lyter '14 
Social 

ESTA WAREHEIM 'lti 

Athletics 
PH1LO STATTON '15 
Alumni 

PAUL. STRICKLER '14 

Music 

RAY P. CAMPBELL '16 

BUSINESS MANAGER 

HARRY CHARLTON '14 

Subscription Price S1.00 per year 
Single Copies 5 els. 
Clubs of ten, 75 els. 

Address all business communications 

to HARRY CHARLTON '14 all Other 

matter to Room 22, Adminis ra- 
tion Building Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege, Annville, Pa. 



EDITORIAL. 

Mind your business! Good ad- 
vice which is ordinarily bluntly stat- 
ed as "Mind your own business." 
But this wholesome bit of counsel 
implies the necessity of having a 
business to mind. The day one set- 
tles in his own mind what is to be 
the real business of his life is a great 
day. From then on he can bend all 
his energies to the task in hand 
without wasting any previous 
strength in the weary attempt to de- 
cide what to do next. 

We, students, are here to make the 
best men and women we possibly can 
out of ourselves. That 13 our cen- 
tral task. What, as students, is the 
business of our lives? It is our busi- 
ness to apply ourselves to our lessons 
approved so as to prove to our par- 
ents that we are here for a purpose. 
They did not send us here to loaf 
or neglect our lessons, Primarily then 
the business of a student is to study. 
We are not minding our business if 
we do not. Something is expected of 
us by those who have not the privi- 
lege of going to school. We must 
occupy the positions of honor and 
trust in the future and have they 
not the right to expect us to be pre- 
pared? 

Are you minding your business or 
are you sailing along, merely mak- 
ing grades enough to pass, critcising 
some one else who is minding his 
business? If being a real student is 
our business, then we should mind 
it, and mind it with all the resources 
at our command. We must do this 
or be untrue to our college. We 
know our business. Let us go for- 
ward and mind it. 



STUDENTS' DRESS PARADE 

Last Monday night the fellows of 
the college believing that the work 
of our football team, in winning 
from Washington college, demanded' 
some recognition, in a spirit of 
loyalty and philanthropy, held an 
informal parade. They left the dor- 
mitory about 8.30 and after sere- 
nading the girls, the coach and the 
president, receiving responses from 
the last two .marched thru the pri- 
vate avenues and sacred byways of 
our time honored hamlet. 

Scarcely had the procession start- 
ed when the administrator of civil 
order, drunk with power, decided on 
his plan of procedure, and as the 
diminutive army marched down 
the main street, the thought of 
their coming filled the officers' heart 
with joy and caused his body to 
round out with new proportions, for 
now was his chance to stop the on- 
slaught with a wave of his oath 
bearing hand and show to the crowd 
standing round the power of tKfe 
law. 

On they came heralded by horns 
of different kinds and dimensions, 
filled with the victors' courage and 
eaerer to make a triumphant march 
through the cities streets. 

As thev leached the sauare the 
command to halt and disband was 
given them, but with no effect. 

Then the nolice captain. seein? 
that his order was not heeded, called 
to the citizens for help, but. they, 
hcldinsr in remembrance some griev- 
ance, did not respond, but railed on 
him because of his cowardice. Dv 
Ibis time the crowd had passed, and 
after paying their respects to the 
captain with a eroaii yell they 
marched to their barrack. 

This little act of resoect to our 
foctball team has cau«ed much talk 
both pro and con. One lady said. 

"T wifjpr T"'hv t^Pv p-p cit Wbei 

they have such a big yard in which 
to play." 



CAMPUS NOTES 

The Hallowe'en party was broken 
up at an early hour this year. 

A prominent visitor leaving the 
library and seeing the diminutive 
carriage in the niche remarked. 
"Does the college furnish such things 
for her sons and daughters? O, per- 
haps a prodigy! 

Many are taking advantage of the 
nice weather. Walks to the Water 
Works and tennis are popular. 

Campus football played with cam- 
pus' rules is the big game for the 
non-football men. 

Saturday nisrht the chapel bell 
rang. I wonder why? 

Beware of the policeman. 

Boys, don't forget the Star Course. 

Freshmen are now allowed to 
walk with the jrirls to their great de- 
light. 

The tennis tournament is now in 
full swing. 



TEMPERANCE LEAGUE 

Matthew Buntz, of Max Meadows,. 
Va., one of the intercollegiate sec- 
retaries of the Prohibition Associa- 
tion, was here for several days last 
week working up interest among 
the fellows. On Tuesday night he 
presented his work at the prayer' 
service and after that meeting he 
organized the league here. The of- 
ficers elected are: President, Faber 
Stengle; Vice-President, J. Maurice 
Leister; Secretary, Edwin Zigler; 
Treasurer, Clayton Zuse: and Re- 
porter,! Frank Van Schaack. 

The League has organized a class 
which will study the liquor prob- 
lem. Prof. Shenk has consented to 
conduct this class and all who wish 
to join should report to the league 
early. The class will meet for a 
half-hour some evening of the week. 

The oratorical contest which is. 
held each year will be participated 
in by some member of the League. 
It is hoped that the local compe- 
tition will be keen so that we can 
have a local contest. 



THE TENNIS TOURNAMENT 

A fall tennis tournament is one 
of the new athletic events that has 
been arranged by Prof. Guyer .Much 
interest is manifested in this sport 
and thirty fellows and sixteen girl^ 
having entered the contest. The tour- 
nament is to be an eliminating one, 
and already several of the matches 
have been played. It is thought by 
the end of the week when the res- 
pective winners start to play that 
the interest will be as high as at 
the time of an inter-class contest. 

FIRST STAR COURSE 

The first Star Course for this sea- 
son will be given on Wednesday 
night. The International Operatic 
company has been secured to give 
this number. The company is com- 
posed cf professional performers of. 
wide experiences and good reputa- 
tions. They will give a varied pro- 
gramme of numbers from the best 
artists and composers. The person- 
nel is good and comes well recccn- 
mended to we can be sure of a 
strong program. 



AFTERNOON RECEPTION. 

Misses Johnson, Adams, Schmidt 
and Seltzer entertained the follow- 
ing persons on Saturday afternoon: 
Mrs. Sheldon, Mrs. Samuel Saylor, 
Mrs. Alfred K. Mills, Misses Marshall, 
Minnie Gossard, Anna Kreider and 
Ora Belle Bachman. The guests 
spent a very pleasant afternoon, and 
enjoyed to the fullest extent the 
dainty refreshments set before them. 



Miss Johnson: What is worse 
than melodrama? 

Al. Weaver: Two melodramas. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



PHILOKOSMIAN 

The Evils of Tammany Hall, Chas. 
Gemmill; Oration Impromptu, H. L. 
-)lewiler; Essay contest, Walter 
Deibler, Norman Buhrman, Evan C. 
B:unner. 

Debate: Resolved, That no one 
should be allowed to participate in 
any L. V. inter-class contest, who 
does not report regularly for varsity > 
practice in the respective lints of 

sport. y 
affirmative, Joseph Donahue, ° 
A. Statton; Negative, A. E. Brenne- 
man, John O. Jones. Vocal solo, 
Conrad K. Curry; Outlook for L. V. 
Basket-ball season, John Machen; 
Living Thoughts, Edison. 

KALO CLIO JOINT SESSION. 

Piano Duet, 

Vera Myers, F. E. Stengle 

Select Reading H. H. Charlton 

Paper Blanche Risser 

Violin Solo Ruth E. Engle 

Sketch, 

Ester Heint/.elinan, Flora Case, 
Harry Bender, Earl Eichel- 
berger. 

Vocal Solo Marcel Von Bereghy 

Olive Branch and Examiner. .Editors 



ambo West Africa. Miss iioerner is 
visiting Prof. Derickson this week 
and will speak to the Christian asso- 
ciation next Sunday. 



ALUMNI. 

Miss Maggie Strickler, '94, of 
Lebanon visited Miss Adams last 
Wednesday. 

Thomas F. Miller, '01, Lebanon 
Valleys first foot ball manager, saw 
:he Wet-ball game at Allentown on 
Saturday. Mr. Miller is in business 
in New York City. 

Misses Edna Kilmer and Helen 
Welder, '12, of High Bridge, N. J., 
and Miss Edith Lehman, '13, of 
Royersford, witnessed the L. V. — 
Muhlenberg game on Saturday. 

Joseph Kreider, '02, is teaching 
at Spokane, Washington. 

On Sunday the new chapel of the 
Second United Brethren church, of 
Philadelphia, was dedicated. All the 
services of the day were held and 
prominent men of the East Penn- 
sylvania conference conducted and 
participated in the meetings. Rev. 
Dr. R. R. Butterwick, '01, of Mount- 
ville, preached the dedicatory ser- 
mon, Rev. Dr. D.' D. Lowery, confer- 
ence superintendent, delivered the 
charge to the trustees and gave theji 
the • key, and Congressman A. S. 
Kreider, of Annville, delivered the 
address at the afternoon fellowship 
meeting. 

Rev. Dr. S. C.'Ench, '91, is the 
Progressive pastor and the great 
work done in Philadelphia is due to 
his untiring efforts. 

Miss Mae Hoerner, '10, for the 
Past three years an instructor in the 
Ncrristown High school, has volun- 
teered as a missionary and is going 
to Africa. Miss Hoerner will sail for 
Africa, October 17th. She is to be a 
eacher in the girls' school at Mov- 



PERSONALS 

An enjoyable Hallowe'en party 
was given last evening by Miss Lu- 
cinda, Potter at her home, 328 South 
Queen street to the members of the 
choir oif Zion Reformed church. The 
home was artistically as well as 
prettily decorated. After playing 
games a luncheon was served, the 
favors being black ba^s which were 
drawn from a huge pumpkin. Each 
bag contained a black cat. about 
whose neck was found a card upon 
which was found the announcement 
of the engagement of Miss Potter to 
Lester A. Rodes, one of the professors 
in Lebanon Valley academy, Ann- 
ville, Pa. — (York Gazette). 

Miss Mae Mcllhenny, of Harris- 
burg, was the guest of Miss Flora 
Paige at the college on Thursday. 

Rev. I. A. Snavely, pastor of the 
First. United Brethren church, of 
Allentown, was on e of the principal 
L. V. rooters at Saturdays game. 

Mr. Steward Innerst spent the 
week-end at his home in Dallastown. 

Mr. Ralph Crabill went to his 
hom e in Hanover to attend a Hal- 
lowe'en party. 

Mr. Harry Baker spent the week- 
end at his home near Shippensburg. 

Mr. Vinton H. Bowen, a junior in 
the Baltimore City College. Balti- 
more. Md.. visited his cousin Miss 
Ethel Houser last week and attend- 
ed the Philo Hallowe'en party. 

Prof. Moll, principal of the schools 
at Richland, visited the schools last 
Saturday. 

Mr. Henry Smith Leiper, traveling 
secretary for the Student Volunteer 
movement ment Friday afternoon 
at school. Mr. T einer expressed him_ 
self a^. hein<r n'cased with the school 
and al'sio arlarl that we are interested 
in the Kansas City convention. 

RAH! RAH! BOYS EAT 

Raw Oysters at "Ussy's" 

OR EAT 'EM STEWED OR FRIED JUST AS 
YOU REFER 

A. S. MILLER W. MAIN ST. 



Journal Publishing Co. 

Printers 



Main Street 



Annville, Pa. 



Get Your Shoes Repaired at 
G 5 AN DO NATO'S SHOP 

[EAST MAIN STREET 

Shop Work done while you wait. 
Satisfaction guaranteed Prices right 



You are correct if you get your 

LADIES' and GENTS' 
FURNISHINGS 

At KINPORTS', Annville, Pa. 

Students' Discount Packard & Radcliffc Shoes 

W, D, ELLIOTT 
Shoemaker 

Repairing neately done. Rubber work a 
specialty. 

Patronage Solicited 
Main St, Annville, Pa- 

LIVERY 

First Class Teams to 
Hire 

Parties* a Sp-cia1t;y 
H. F\ LO NG & SON 

RearEagle Hotel Ann ville. Ha 

WM. WALTZ 

Hair Cutting and Shaving 
Saloon 



W. Main St. 



Annville. Pa 



For Cakes and Confectionery 

GO TO 

Bowman's Bakery 

A FULL SUPPLY OF HALL'S CHOCO^ 
LATES. ALWAYS FRESH 

W, Main St. Annville, Pa. 

Home-Made Noodles, Peanut Butter 

H. B. FLOWERS 

Manufacturer of 

''Flower Brand" Potato 
Chips 

LEBANON. PA. 



DIVES, 

P0MER0Y 
& STEWART 




READING, PA 



COLLEGE NEWS 



GO TO IT BOYS 



ITS 



Russ Brothers 
Velvet Ice Cream 



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A. S. MILLER, W. Main St. 

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WINDSOR HOTEL 

W. T. BRUBAKER, Manager. 
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PHILADELPHIA 



Miss Alice Jumper, a teacher In 
the Steelton schools, visited Miss 
Belle Orris last week. 

Misa Mary Bassler, of Hummels- 
town, moved to the Ladies' dormi- 
tory last week. 

President G. D. Gossard, delivered 
the principal address at the Sunday 
schccl rally at the Salem U. B. 
church, Lebanon, on Sunday. 

Misg Kathcrine Boltz entertained 
some of (her school friends at dinner 
on Sunday. 

Miss Martha Snyder spent the 
week end at her home in Chambers- 
burg. 

Miss Lillian Hummer, Manheim, 
was the guest of Miss Luella Hertzler 
over the week end. 

Prof. H.^ H. Shenk delivered his 
lecture on, "The Survival of the Fit- 
test," at Jonestown on Saturday 
night. 

Miss Mary Wyand spent Saturday 
and Sunday as the guest of Miss 
Ruth Strickler at her home in Leb- 
anon. 

Miss Dora Silberman, of Lebanon, 
npent Friday visiting friends in 
Reading. 

On November 11th the lovers of 
high class music in Annville, Leba- 
non, Hershey and vicinity will be 
given the treat of their lives when 
the Lebanon Valley Conservatory of 
Music will introduce to them Edward 
Baxter Perry, the noted blind pianist 
•/ho will present one cf his renowned 
concert programs consist in 's of a lec- 
ture and music recital. Beth Ameri- 
can and foreign critics have been 
enthusiastic in their praises of Mr. 
Perry's playing. Be sure to hear 
him. 

The following new members have 
been added to the Conservatory of 
Music enrollment: Misses LuclHe 
Donmoyer and Kathryn Miller of 
Lebanon; Miss Edna Anne, of Lan- 
caster, and Misses Josephine Rafter- 
ing and Josephine Stine, of Annville. 

The Junior class of the Conserva- 
tory organized last week. The fol- 
lowing officers were chosen: Presi- 
dent, Mr. L. ('. Bnrnpf. v'ce-nrrs 1 - 
dent, Miss MabePe Shanaman; and 
secretary, Miss Mabel Bensing. 



Patronize the 



Y. M. C. A. 

Mr. Jolm Ness lead the regular 
Y. M. C. A. meeting on Sunday af - 
ternoon. He used, "Prayer" for his 
subect and spoke of its powe: , ir.-> 
influence and its effects when used, 
and showed how a life changes when 
not nourished with prayer. A gen- 
eral discussion followed in which 
many participated. The meeting 
was interesting and helpful. 



Academy Tailor 

DAVID B. BflSHORE 



Clothing Called for 
and Returned 



Academy Bid j 
Room 18 



D. B. SHIFFER 
GRADUATE OPTICIAN 

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COIiliEGE flEW| 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



m 

A? 



Volume V. Annville, Pa., Tuesday, fiovember 11, 1913 Ho. 9 

Entered as second-class matter November 12, 1910, at the post office at Annville, Pa., under the act of March 3, 1879. 



LEBANON VALLEY DEFEATED IN 




TWO HARD FOUGHT CONTESTS GIVE FINE CONCERT 



Blue and White Team Puts Up Great Game Against 
Muhlenberg aud Dickinson 



MUHLENBERG 

Battling against a team its su- 
perior in weight and condition. Leb- 
anon Valley lost to Muhlenberg by a 
score of 35 to 0. Our team started 
the game with four substitute men 
in the line-up, and before the game 
was over, two more new men were 
added. The crippled team went 
against an eleven who outweighed 
them ten pounds to the man. 

Muhlenberg started off with a 
rush and carried the ball through 
cur line for a touchdown, after 
about a number of play. During the 
first period, twenty-eight points 
were scored. The score locked doubt- 
ful and Allentown fans began to 
have visions of a seventy-five to 
nothing victory. However, these 
thoughts were soon dispelled from 
their minds. 

The second quarter started with 
Lebanon Valley holding the ball on 
their twenty yard line. On a play 
through the line, the ball was fumb- 
led and a Muhlenberg tackle picked 
it up. The ball was here carried 
over for the last touchdown of the 
game. Our team received the next 
kick and held their opponents till 
the period was over. 

The second half of the game went 
'n Lebanon Valley's favor. From the 
time the ball was kicked until the 
final whistle blew, Muhlenberg was 
kept busy keeping cur team from 
their goal. The best critics of the 
game say that the Maroon and Grey 
we re clearly outplayed throughout 
t } "?st last two periods. Frequently 
L'-canon Valley would carry the ball 
to Muhlenberg's ten yard line, but 
ecu Id not make the goal. It is un- 
fortunate that the eleven did not 
get started to work during the first 
garter, but luck was against them, 
in Wind blew a11 afternoon and 

ttle firs t Period we were kept bat- 
Continued on pa ^e 2 



DiCKINSON 

In a hard-fought and extremely 
interesting game Lebanon Valley 
went down to defeat at the hands of 
Dickinson by a score of 38-12. Al- 
though a one-sided score is indicat- 
ed by the final out-come of the con- 
test, it was necessary to fight for 
every inch gained. For every Dick- 
inson touchdown, Lebanon Valley's 
fighting spirit went one notch high- 
er. The two scores which were made 
by the White and Blue were the re- 
sults of two beautiful plays. 

Our team went to Carlisle in a 
still somewhat crippled condition, 
but were bound to rid the school of 
the disgrace of the 1912 score. Al- 
though fighting hard to turn the 
tccre in our favor the repeated runs 
cf Dickinson's big full-back could 
not be checked, and had their effect 
upon the final tally. Whenever, 
Dickinson got within striking dis- 
tance of our goal, Dunn would be 
called upon to rush the ball across 
the line. It was this backfield man's' 
star playing that defeated Lebanon 
Valley. 

In the beginning of the gam e 
Captain Strickler won the toss and 
chose to receive the ball and defend 
the south goal. 

Things, started favorably and we 
made a gain of five yards through 
the line, but here the umpire called 
a foul and we were taken back to 
within cur ten yard line. Luck was 
against us and after two more downs 
we kicked. 

Dunn on an end run carried the 
ball across for Dickinson's first 
touchdown. In this first quarter 13 
points were scored against us. 

At the beginning of the 2nd quar- 
ter, cur eleven worked the ball down 
the field till they were within the 
thirty yard line. From this point, 
Lerew sailed a pretty forward pass 
for twenty yards, to Mackert, who 
Continued on page 2 



FIRST STAR COURSE, 

Last Wednesday, Nov. 5, the chapel 
room of the conservatory of music 
was crowded to the doors to hear 
the first Star Course number of this 
year. The International Operatic 
Company was the first of our num- 
bers. Each member was an artist In 
the truest sense of the word and each 
number was excellently rendered.. 
Solos and duets from Verdi, Handel 
and Spence delighted the audience.. 
Miss Day, the pianist, played a "Mili- 
tary Polonaise" (Opus 53) from 
Chopin. This solo was very well 
rendered. As a final number the 
company gave the entire second act 
of "Martha" by Flotow. The pro- 
gramme was well appreciated and 
very well given. These artists were 
of the first class and every one was 
highly entertained in the best pos- 
sible way. 



CLIO-KALO JOINT SESSION. 

On Friday night the Clionian and 
Kalozetean literary societies met in 
joint session in the hall of the lat- 
ter society. The program which was 
printed in last week's issue was very 
well rendered. The attendance was 
so large that some persons were 
obliged to stand during part of the 
program. The hall was beautifully 
decorated with autumn leaves. 

After the program sandwiches, 
cocoa, and root-beer were served. 
After the refreshments Prof. Shenk 
and Prof. Shroyer spoke, and Mr.. 
Jamison gave a number of readings. 
Then Miss Johnson took charge of 
the games, which were enjoyed by 
every one. 

The following members of the 
faculty were present: Dr. Gossard, 
Professors Shenk, Shroyer, and De- 
rickson; Misses Johnson, Adams, and 
Schmidt. Among the visitors were: 
Miss Gossard, Miss Hoerner, '10, and 
Miss Dora Ryland. 

All those present declared that 
they had spent a very pleasant even- 
ing. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



College fiecus 



Issued weekly during the College 
Year by the Students of Lebanon 
Valley College 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

R. M. WEIDLER '14 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 
florence mentz '15 
John b. lyter '14 
Social 

EST A WAREHEIM '16 
Athletics 

PHILO STATTON '15 

Alumni 
PAUL STRICKXER '14 

Music 

RAY P. CAMPBELL "16 

BUSINESS MANAGER 

HARRY CHARLTON '14 



Subscription Price $ 1.00 per year 
Single Copies 5 cts. 
CI nbs of ten, 75 cts. 

Address all business communications 

to HARRY CHARLTON '14 all Other 

matter to Room 22, Administra- 
tion Building Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege, Annville, Pa. 



EDITOKIAL. 

That this has been one of our best 
seasons in foot-ball, no one will deny. 
We have played more college teams 
than ever before; we have played 
better foot-ball than ever beiore; 
therefore we have made our best 
scores this year. With this athletic 
success the> thermometer of college 
spirit has risen to a very high point 
and welded our pride for the school 
into a ring of eternal love. 

In every cause, especially a good 
cause, there should be a climax. 
Now in our athletics we do not work 
up to any one high points as they 
do at other schools, but our zeal runs 
as a weather graft high and low, a 
climax or a catastrophe. 

What should be our natural friend 
and rival in athletics, is in fact our 
enemy. And instead of us playing 
a deciding game each year to close 
the season, this year, because of their 
stubborness, we will not play them 
at all. 

Every college has some other col- 
lege which they claim as their rivals 
in athletic sports, and every college 
has what they call their big game. 
The team works in such a way as 
to be in the best condition for this 
game, the coach directs and plans 
for this game, students talk about 
it, work up enthusiasm for it, and 
cheer at it, while alumni come back 
to their Alma Mater to see this great 
game of the season. Is not this what 
we want? We have been unrortu- 
nate for some years in our athletics 
but now that we are coming to our 
own let us plan to have a rivalry 
game. Let us have a chance to learn 



what true sportsmans rivalry is. 
For the past few years we could 
never tell after a season whether the 
same teams would play with us 
again, or whether we would have a 
team to put on the field against them, 
but now that we are sure of progress- 
ing in athletics let us try and get 
our rival and play the annual foot- 
ball contest. 

Since our natural rival does not 
want to play us, let us hunt for an- 
other rival and arrange with her for 
an annual foot-ball game. ir we 
do this in a few years the team, the 
students, and friends of the school 
will be worked up to that point that 
team support will be easy and cheer- 
ing spontaneous. 

Then we would have the climax 
foot-ball season and a letter foot- 
ball game, and the fame of our insti- 
tution would reach beyona our iitlie 
circle into the national college sport 
arena. 

MUHLENBERG GAME 



Continued from pajre 1 

tling against it. Several times our 
kicks were blown back till they bare- 
ly made ten yards. Wheelock did 
Lebanon Valley's punting, C. Snavely 
being out cf the game. "Joel's run- 
ning was a feature of the game for, 
he made several big gains. 

Evans who was at right half, 
picked at the ball from a Muhlen- 
berg fumble and ran forty yards be- 
ing finally tackled in the five yard, 
line It was a great run and seemed 
hard luck that the ball was not car- 
ried over. 

Muhlenberg has a good team thU 
year and will win more games be* 
fere the clcss of the season. They 
played Lafayette to a 7-7 score and 
held Lehigh to seven points, so our 
showing against them is net so bad 
as the ecore really indicates. 

Line-up: 

Muhlenberg Lebanon Valle;/ 

Hubbard . . . .L. E E. Snavely 

Flexler L. T Mackert 

Seidel L. G Mickay 

Erickson C Von Beryhy 

Ritter R. G Hollinger 

Copley R. T Statton 

Dettling R. F Schwartz 

Laudentlager . ... ..Q. B Lerew 

Berry L. H. B Donahue 

Henninger ..R. H. B. . . Wheelock 

Skean F. B Pell 

Touchdowns — Copley, 2 ; Berry, 
Skean, Henninger. Goals from touch- 
down — Berry, 5. Substitutions — 
Muhlenberg — -Hayes for Dettling, 
Fetherolf for Ericks-cn, Roderick 
for Seidel. Lebanon Valley — Wen- 
rick for Hollinger, Schmidt for 
Snavely, Evans for Donahue, Tims 
of quarters — 15 minutes. Referee — 
Ellicot, Lafayette. Umpire — Ryan, 
Michigan. Head linesman — Bruce, 
State. 



DICKINSON GAME 



Continued from page I 



caught it and plunged over the goal 
line for our first six points. The ball, 
was placed at a bad angle for kick- 
ing the goal, and the extra point was 
not gained. 

Our other touchdown came as the 
result of the longest run ever made 
in a football game on Biddle field. 
The ball was kicked off to us after a 
touchdown had beei, made, and 
Wheelock received it. From out of a 
tangle of tackles and blockers 
chief emerged, and from our five 
yard line ran the length of the field 
for a touchdown. Several Dickinson 
backs dove for the legs of Joel but 
in vain. Wheelock's tackling was' 
deadly and he was in every play that 
came his way. 

Line-up: 

Dickinson L. V. 

McCarthy L. E Lerew^ 

Trego L. T Mackert* 

Watkins L. G Mickey 

Homberger C VonBeigly 

Brown R. G DeHuff 

Rudenbaugh . . . . R. T Statton 

Shearer R. E Snavely 

Goldstein Q. B Strickler 

Sharp ... L. H. B. ... Donahue 

Wilson . . . .R. H. B Wheelock 

Dunn F. B Pell 

Touchdowns — Mackert, Wjheelock, 
Dunn, 4; Shearer, Dalton. Goals 
from touchdown, Trego, 2. Referee — 
Dunn, P. D. C. Umpire — Weymouth, 
Yale. Linesman, Peifer, F. & M.. 
Time — Fcur 12 minute quarters. 



JOINT SESSION OF 

CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATIONS 

On Sunday afternoon the Y. W. C. 
A. and Y. M. C. A. held a joint ses- 
sion. Miss Wareheim, chairman of 
the Y. W. C. A. missionary commit- 
tee, led the meeting which was a 
"Why Meeting." Miss Wareheim 
gave the three primary motives for 
carrying on foreign missionary work. 
Miss Mathias read a prayer by 
Horatius Bonar. Miss Ruth Huber 
recited an appropriate selection and 
Mr. Lester Rodes sang a beautiful 
solo. 

Miss L. May Hoerner, '10, who will 
sail on Nov. 19 for Africa where she 
will teach in our Moyamba school, 
gave a very interesting and heiprui 
talk. She spoke of three "Why's" 
as follows: "Why do you believe in 
foreign missions? Why you should 
consider going to the foreign field, 
and Why you should consider this 
question now." She also gave a pic- 
ture of the great need and the great 
opportunities in the foreign field. 
Then she gave her reasons for going 
to the foreign field. The service was 
an interesting one and was well at- 
tended. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



THE TENNIS 

TOURNAMENT 



The beautiful weather of last week 
was conducive to good tennis, and 
the interest in the game reached a 
high point. The courts were occu- 
pied from early morning until dark, 
and many interesting sets were play- 
ed. 

The tournament has awakened 
much interest in tennis. Nearly all 
of the sets scheduled for last week 
have been played, and some that 
were scheduled for this week were 
played off last week. Most of the 
games were very gooc, and were well 
attended. If the weather does not 
get too cold and stormy, and the 
courts can be gotten into good con- 
dition after the rains, the tournament 
will probably be finished this week. 

The season for tennis has nearly 
closed, but we hope that the interest 
that has been shown during the au- 
tumn will not wane, and with the 
coming of spring, it will be renewed 
with as much vigor as possible. Here 
is to the spring tournament, let us 
hope that it will be as successful as 
the one now in progress is. 



CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC. 

The names of two more new stu- 
dents were added to the enrollment 
of the Conservatory last week. They 
were those of Miss Myrtle Grundrum, 
of Lebanon, and Miss Florence 
Christeson, of Annville. 

Mr. Walter E. Deibler spent sev- 
eral days at his home in Millersnurg 
recently. 



RAH! RAH! BOYS EAT 

Raw Oysters at ''Ussy's" 

OR EAT 'EM STEWED OR FRIED JUST AS 
YOU REFER 

A. S. MILLER W. MAIN ST. 

Journal Publishing Co. 

Printers 



Main Street 



Annville, Pa. 



Get Your Shoes Repaired at 
GIANDONATO'S SHOP 

LEAST MAIN STREET 

Shop Work done while you wait. 
Satisfaction guaranteed Prices right 

D. L. SAYLOR & SONS 

CONTRACTORS and BUILDERS 

Dealers in 
LUMBER and COAL - ANXVILLE, PA. 



Mrs. Alfred K. Mills, formerly a 
member of the Conservatory faculty, 
appeared before the Ladies' Guild as 
soloist on Thursday afternoon. She 
had for her accompanist Miss Ora 
Bacbman. 

Mr. Faber E. Stengle went to his 
home in Oberlin last Tuesday to 
vote. 

The members of the Senior Class 
of the Conservatory are displaying 
their recently purchased rings. The 
rings are very neat and attractive, 
being of the signet style with the 
class numerals, '14, and the letters 
L. V. C. C. of M. embossed upon 
them. 

Sir Edward Baxter Perry's piano- 
forte lecture recital tonight. 



Patronize the 



Alumni 



Mrs. Minnie E. Weinman Lytle, 
'93, of Wilkinsburg, Pa., visited the 
school last Tuesday. 

Prof. C. C. Peters, '05, principal of 
the Royersford schools, was one of 
the instructors at the Montgomery 
County Institute. 

At the election last Tuesday Pro- 
fessor S. H. Derickscn, '02, and Pro- 
fessor H. Clay Deaner, '7 9, were 
elected school directors for the Ann- 
ville schools. 

Mr. Claire F. Harnish, of Mechan- 
icsburg, spent Sunday in Annville, 
visiting friends. 

Mr. Josiah F. Reed, '12, who is 
working with a construction com- 
pany at Shenandoah, visited school 
on Monday. 

Miss Elizabeth Rechard, '13, an 
instructor in the English department 
of the York High School, spent Sun- 
day visiting friends at school. 

Mr. G. A. Richie, '13, who is 
working in New York City, has had 
his salary increased from twelve to 
fifteen hundred dollars a, year. 

Miss Florence Christison, '13, has 
resigned as a teacher in the High- 
spire High school, and will 
the winter at home. 



spend 



CALENDAR. 

Tuesday 6-7 — Students' Prayer 
Meeting. 8 p. m., Pianoforte Lecture 
Recital by Sir Edward Baxter Perry. 

Wednesday 11 a. m.— Addresses by 
Bishop Howard and Dr. Hough. 

Friday, 7.00 — Society. 

Saturday, 3.00 — Football game. 

F. and M. vs. L. V. at Lancaster. 

Sunday, 1.00 and 1.30— Y. W. and 
Y. M. C. A. 



Academy Tailor 

DAVID B. BflSHORE 



Clothing Called for 
and Returned 



Academy Bid g 
Room 18 



D. B. SHIPPER 
GRADUATE OPTICIAN 

Eyes Examined, Glasses Fitted, Broken 
Lenses Replaced, anything in 
the Optical line 



East Main St 



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A. G. Spauliing & Bros, are outfitters to 
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COLLEGE NEWS 



GO TO IT BOYS 




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A. S. MILLER, W. Main St. 

eCebanon l/alley 
College 

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Group System. 

Special Facilities in Chemistry 

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Music, Art, Oratory 

Ladies in the Hall are under the con- 
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Write for catalogue 

Sfcev. S. 7). Sossard, {President 
jfnnviile, tPa. 



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PHILADELPHIA 



Items of Interest 



Mr. Morris A. Meyer, a former L. 
V. student, was elected to the Ann- 
ville school board last Tuesday. 

Miss Edna M. Harnish, of Carlisle, 
a freshman in Dickinson college, 
spent Sunday at school visiting her 
brother, Leray Bowers and her 
friends. 

Messrs. Harnish, Leister, DeHuff 

and Zuse went home and voted last 
Tuesday. 

Miss Jessie Hoerner, of Mechanics- 
burg, visited Prof, and Mrs. Derick- 
son over Sunday. 

Prof. Roy J. Guyer spent Sunday 
at his home in Shippensburg. 

Miss Mary Nissley, of Middletown, 
a former student here, received li- 
cense from the United Brethren 
church last week to be a deaconess. 

Miss Ruth Quigley, of Red Lion, 
visited the school on Saturday. Miss 
Quigley was a conservatory student 
last year. 

Miss Dora Ryland, of Cressona, a 
former member of the conservatory 
is visiting the Misses Bachmans. 

Several minor improvements have 
been made during the past week. 
Miss Ora Bachman has had several 
beautiful rugs put in her studio, sev- 
eral labor saving devices have been 
put in the kitchen and a new short 
beamed imported Sarforius balance 
scales his been added to the laboratory. 

The "News" is glad to announce 
that a daughter has been born to Mr. 
and Mrs. Mark G. Holtzman, of 
Philadelphia. Mr. Holtzman was a 
student here some years ago and is 
now in the Sunday school work in 
Philadelphia. 

A goodly number of students went 
along with the football team to Car- 
lisle and they enjoyed the game. 

Miss Mary Bassler, who has been 
ill in the ladies' dormitory for the 
past few days is getting better. 

Last Wednesday afternoon at three 
o'clock Miss Dora Long, daughter of 
Rev. and Mrs. D. E. Long and Omar 
Hummel, of Hummeistown, were 
married by Pres. G. D. Gossard. Both 
Mr. and Mrs. Hummel were former 
Lebanon Valley students. After 
their wedding trip Mr. and Mrs. 
Hummel will reside in Hummeistown 
where Mr. Hummel is in business. 

President G. D. Gossard filled the 
U. B. pulpit at Pottsville on Sunday 
morning. 

Prof. Lehman is on the sick list. 

Prof. Shenk spent Monday in Har- 
risburg. 



You are correct if you get your 

LADIES' and CENTS' 
FURNISHINGS 

At KINPORTS', Annville, Pa. 

Students' Discount Packard & Radcliffe Shoe* 

W, D. ELLIOTT 
Shoemaker 

Repairing neately done. Rubber work a. 
specialty. 

Patronage Solicited 
Railroad St. Annville, Pa^ 

LIVERY 

Kirst Class Teams to 
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Parties a Specialty 

H. F\ LONG & SON 
Rear Eagle Hotel Annville, F"a 

WM. WALTZ 
Hair Cutting and Shaving 
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For Cakes and Confectionery 

GO TO 

Bowman's Bakery 

A FULL SUPPLY OF HALL'S CHOCO* 
LATES. ALWAYS FRESH 

W, Main St. Annville, Pa t 

Home-Made Noodles, Peanut Butter 

H. B. FLOWERS 

Manufacturer of 

' Flower Brand" Potato 
Chips 

LEBANON, PA. 

Photographs 

Duplicate Photo- 
graphs can be had 
from the negative® 
made at Lebanon 
Valley College. 

Place orders with 
Mr. A. L. Weaver. 

Special Prices giv- 
en students having 
Photographs made at 
our Studio. 

DIVES, P0MER0Y 
& STEWART 

READING, PA, 



COLiliEGE flEWS 

LEBANON VALLEY C(^pGE 



Volume V. Annville, Pa., Tuesday, govern 1 18, 1913 



Ho. lO 



Entered as second-class matter November 12, 1910, at the post office at Annv /ff ... under the act of March 3, 1879. 




HEW CLICK 
TO LEBANON WftLLtY 



Everybody speaks well of our new 
clock. The town people are glad for 
they feel that Lebanon Valley has 
at last been brought to time; while 
the students are glad because time 
has been brought to Lebanon Valley. 
Now people stop as the bell tolls the 
hour for they want to hear every 
ring of this new clock. 

Our new time piece is the most 
popular sized clock put out by the 
E. Howard Clock company of Bos- 
ton. It is the three-tnousand one- 
hundred and sixty-eighth clock of its 
kind used in this country. The clock 
is an eight day striking tower clock 
striking both hours and half hours. 

The running of the clock is very 
interesting. A pendulum nine and 
one-half feet long, with an eighty- 
five pound pendulum ball, having a 
second and a half beat, marks off 
the time. Two hundred pounds of 
weight, suspended in a twenty-six 
foot weight box, runs the time; and 
nine hundred pounds of weight, sus- 
pended in a forty-six foot weight box, 
runs the striking system. 

The college bell, which is fifty 
feet from the clock works, is tolled 
by means of a system of levers which 
operate a forty pound hammer. 

The dial of the clock, which is on 
the front of the building, is five feet 
in diameter and has gilt hands and 
numbers. The clock is set from the 
inside by means of an index move- 
ment on the dial shaft, and is guar- 
anteed not to vary a minute, a 
month. 

Mr. George E. Witham, a repre- 
sentative of the company, put the 
clock in place and started it run- 
ning last week. 

The clock is a present from the 
Class of 1913. It is a valuable, orna- 
mental and useful gift and we are 
proud of it, and trust that it may 
serve as an example to every suc- 
ceeding class to show their love and 
loyalty to the school by giving some- 
thing worth while to their Alma 
Mater. 



Miss Myra Kiracofe spent Saturday 
and Sunday at Manheim as a guest 
of Miss Hertzler. 




.LB. Pill LLC. 
GIVES FINE RECITAL PLAY HARD 




Edward Baxter Perry, of Boston, 
appeared before a very representa- 
tive audience last Tuesday evening 
in the Engle Auditorium and pre- 
sented his pianoforte-lecture recital 
on "Medieval Legends." Mr. Perry 
proved himself to be truly a wonder- 
ful musician, for, although blind, he 
played in such a manner as to make 
the audience almost forget his infirm- 
ity. He commanded a remarkable 
accuracy, while his technic, showing 
very plainly the poetic feeling of the 
artist, was faultless. The well-chos- 
en and instructive remarks which he 
gave before the rendition of each 
composition formed an interesting 
feature of the "concert. People from 
Hershey, Palmyra and members of 
the Harmonia Circle of Lebanon 
were in attendance. Upon the com- 
pletion of the program everyone left 
feeling delighted with the pleasure 
derived from the recital. 



WANTED. 

The college is very desirous of se- 
curing a complete file of old cata- 
logues. Catalogues of the years '90- 
'91 and '95-'96 will complete the files. 
If you have either of these catalogues 
please mail or forward same to 
Registrar. 

I 



BISHOP HOWARD 
SPEAKS TO STUDENTS 



We were very fortunate in having 
Bishop Howard, who was recently 
elected bishop of the foreign work 
of the U. B. church to address the 
students on Wednesday. Bishop How- 
ard gave a very interesting and help- 
ful address on "How our education- 
al work and our foreign missionary 
work can help each other." 

He said foreign missions can help 
to associate students with some of 
the greatest problems confronting 
the church today. Practically all of 
these problems are found in foreign 
missions. 

Continued on page 2 



With her team in badly crippled 
condition, Lebanon Valley journeyed 
to Lancaster last Saturday and held 
F. & M. to two touchdowns which 
tallied fourteen points. Considering 
the strength of F. & M. who has, this- 
season, won from Dickinson and only 
been defeated by U. of P. by a score 
of 13-6, and the number of cripples 
on Lebanon Valley's line-up, tbe 
score makes a good showing. 

The game from start to finish was 
hard fought and at no time was the 
outcome a certain one. The field was 
slippery and muddy due to the 
amount of rain which had drizzled 
down since morning. The dampness 
prohibited any extensive use of the 
forward pass and made straight foot- 
ball almost a necessity, 

Lebanon Valley kicked off at the 
start and was thrown on the defen- 
sive for the first few minutes. Frank- 
lin and Marshall's tricky little quar- 
terback, Mylin, squirmed through the 
(Continued on page 3) 



CALENDAR. 



-Pray- 



Tuesday, Nov. 18, 6 p. m. 
er meeting. 

Wednesday, Nov. 19, 7 p. m. — 
Athletic Board meeting. 7 p. m.,. 
Mathematical Round Table. 

Friday, Nov. 21, 8 p. m. — Forty- 
third Clionian Literary Society An- 
niversary. 

Saturday, Nov. 22, 3 p. m. — Foot- 
ball game. Lebanon Valley vs. Car- 
lisle Indian Second team on L. V.'s 
athletic field. 

Sunday, Nov. 23, 1.30 and 1 p. m.. 
— Y. W. and Y. M. C. A. 

j 

PHILO OFFICERS. 

The following men were elected to 
office in the Philokosmian Literary 
Society: President, Russell M. Weid- 
ler; Vice-President, Paul J. Bowman; 
Recording Secretary, C. H. Zuse; 
Corresponding Secretary, H. W. Ris- 
ser; Critic, E. H. Smith; Pianist, Ray 
P. Campbell; Chaplain, Lester B. 
Zug; Janitor, Guy R. Yarrison; 1st 
Assistant Janitor, W. E. Deibler; 2nd: 
Assistant Janitor, Frank S. Attinger:. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



College fietus 



Issued weekly during' the College 
Year by the Students of Lebanon 
Valley College 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 
R. M. WEIDLER '14 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 
florence mentz '15 
John b. lyter '14 
Social 

ESTA WAREHEIM '16 

A i hie tics 
PIIILO STATTON '15 

Alumni 
PAUL, STRICKLER '14 

Music 

RAY P. CAMPBELL '16 

BUSINESS MANAGER 

HARRY CHARLTON '14 



"Subscription Price $1.00 per year 
Single Copies 5 els. 
Clubs of ten, 75 cts. 

Address all business communications 

to HARRY CHARLTON '14 all Other 

matter to Room 22, Adminisra- 
tion Building Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege, Annville, Pa. 

There is a group of men at Leba- 
non, who until this time have re- 
ceived nothing, but hard knocks, but 
who at the same time have been do- 
ing more for their college than they 
have generally been given credit for. 
This group have had but one thing 
to work for and only one, and that 
was something which will bring no 
:glory to them, but to the school. 
This group is our scrub football 
team. 

All through the football season 
they have been faithful. They have 
had no special incentive to work as 
they have worked, except for their 
desire to see a winning team at Leb- 
anon Valley, and their love for the 
;school. They have had no schedule 
of their own for which to train and 
keep in condition, few of them have 
seen any possibility of making the 
varsity team, but even so they have 
played good, hard, football against 
the varsity three days each week, 
until they have developed themselves 
•as well as the varsity into excellent 
teams. Many times have they given 
the first team stronger fights, and 
made them exert themselves more 
than opposing college teams have 
done. For this good, honest work 
throughout the season, we wish to 
commend and thank the scrubs. 

Although, scrubs, you may not 
think very much of wnat you have 
done, think of this for a moment. 
The hard scrimmages you have giv- 
en the varsity have kept them on 
edge all season. Lebanon Valley is 
again known in the college football 
world as a dangerous rival, and your 
hard work is only second to that of 
the varsity who actually played the 
;games, in bringing this about. You 



ullje (Elinmatt ICtterary ^tfrirto 
of 

iCebantm Hallpy (EnU?gp 
miurats tljr lunuir of gmtr urrsrnn? 
at ttii 

Sfartg-uHttrli Amuumiarg 
iFri&ag punting, 2fatipmbfr ©uipntu-first 
mttpirnt lutttorpo attft Utirtmt 
at litjljt o'rlnrk 
latglp (Eonspruatnrtt 



have also received excellent train- 
ing this year. Next year will see 
some of the varsity players gone 
from school, the next year the same 
thing will happen. Who will take 
the place of these men, and help 
keep Lebanon Valley on the football 
map? The answer is simple. It will 
have to be the scrubs. This will be 
the reward for your labors of the 
present season, and wfe are sure that 
if you show but a part of the enthu- 
siasm in the next few years, that you 
have shown this year, Lebanon Val- 
ley need worry but little as to her 
future football teams. 



BISHOP HOWARD ADDRESSES THE 
STUDENTS. 

(Continued from page lj 



He said that the great problems in 
Africa were paganism and Moham- 
medanism. In Japan they have the 
very tolerant Buddhist religion in 
which there is no settled belief. The 
Buddhists are seeking to bring into 
their religion all sorts of Christian 
activities. They are organizing 
Buddhist Sunday schools and young 
men's organizations. He said that 
it is hard for the people to distin- 
guish what is really Buddhist and 
what is really Christian. The great 
difficulty is in enabling the people 
to understand the terms of the gos- 
pel because they have no word for 
"sin" and no word for "God." The 
missionaries must interpret the mean- 
ing of a personal God. This often 
requires years. 

He said that the Christian gospel 
must give the Chinese a God whom 
they can reverence, and that it must 
solve the problem for Porto Rico and 
the Philippines where Romanism ha3 
degenerated. 

"There never can be great progress 
in these countries until these reli?icus 
problems are solved." 



"In the foreign field the churches 
are co-operating as they do not do 
at home. This co-operation is the 
most hopeful situation." 

"This great missionary movement 
calls out the heroic. Men and wom- 
en, who are genuine heroes are en- 
gaged in this work. This great 
movement calls out our prayer life. 
The task is too great to ever dream 
cf accomplishing it without God's 
blessing. It is a tremendous problem 
to train workers for the five million 
people abroad for whose evangeliza- 
tion the U. B. church is responsible. 
I call you to a life of prayer that this 
great task may be accomplished." 

After Bishop Howard's address Dr. 
Hough, secretary of our foreign mis- 
sionary society made a few very 
good remarks. Bishop Howard will 
sail for Africa on Nov. 19. 



Y. W. C. A. 

The president of the Y. W. C. A. 
led the meeting on Sunday at 1.15. 
Her subject was "God's Care." The 
subject was inspired by that hymn 
called "God Will Take Care of You." 
The meeting was well attended and 
enjoyed by all. 

Last week, Nov. 9-15, was the 
Students Week of Prayer. Every day 
except Wednesday at 12.45 the girls 
gathered in the ladies' parlors and 
tad a few minutes of prayer and con- 
sideration of the problems facing the 
students and members of the Y. W. 
C. A. in all parts of the world. Africa, 
India, Turkey, China, Japan, Russia 
and America were some of the sub- 
jects for prayer. It is hoped that 
through world-wide prayer we might 
draw closer as an association to our 
Master. 



MlfiS Gertrude K. richmidt went to 
New York Friday morning to see a 
iiiend sail for Europe on Saturday. 
She also paid a visit 10 ner home 
at New fruncwick, N. J. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



CAMPUS NOTES. 

Only one more week of football. 
Let everybody turn out to the prac- 
tices this week, and don't forget the 
game next Saturday. 

Some of the new students clap af- 
ter the rendition of a classical com- 
position in order to hear a familiar 
ragtime eneore. 

Several fellows walked to Lancas- 
ter last Friday night in order to see 
the F. and M. vs. L. V. game on Sat- 
urday afternoon. 

The Varsity-Scrub football game 
attracted a large crowd on Thurs- 
day. 



OFFICIAL PHOTOGRAPHER HERE. 

Several weeks ago a representative 
photographer was sent to Lebanon 
Valley from Dives, Pomeroy and 
Stewart, Reading, to take the pic- 
tures for "The Bizarre." ror sev- 
eral years he has taken the pictures 
for State, Muhlenberg, Albright, Sus- 
quehanna and others. So this year 
the Junior class decided to have him 
come and take the pictures for their 
annual. He fixed up a studio in the 
administration building and set to 
work. That week he took many pic- 
tures and made the proofs but the 
pictures did not arrive until last 
week. Entire satisfaction has been 
the result. Whether the custom is 
a good one to continue can not be de- 
termined as yet but we hope it will 
prove a success. 



Y. M. C. A. 

"Lessons from the Life of Christ," 
was the subject under discussion at 
the Y. M. C. A. on Sunday. Mr. 
Leister, the leader, mentioned some 
of the lessons we could get from 
Christ's life, and after showing their 



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application to our lives opened the 
meeting for discussion. Many of the 
beautiful features of the life and ac- 
tions of Christ were mentioned. The 
meeting was very interesting and 
helpful, for good ideals were set up 
for the association members to pat- 
tern after. 



FOOT BALL 



Continued from page 1 



L. V. line for the first touchdown af- 
ter three minutes of play. 

This score put our eleven on their 
mettle and from then there was no 
scoring till the fourth quarter. 

After the first touchdown, Capt. 
Strickler decided to kick once more 
but this time the ball did not remain 
in possession of F. & M. for very 
many minutes. L. V. took the ball 
and carried it down the field; a fum- 
ble here prevented a tie score at this 
period of the game. During the sec- 
ond quarter the ball stayed within 
the two thirty yard lines and the 
game was played hard. The half end- 
ed with the ball in possession of L. 
V. in the center of the field. 

The second part of the game was 
fought in a semi-darkness, in which 
the ball was anybody's ball. The 
stands could not tell who had the pig- 
skin, and could hardly see the plays. 
In the last quarter L. V. fumbled and 
F. & M. recovered the ball in a good 
position for a second touchdown. 
Here Hartman, the big tackle, car- 
ried the ball over the goal for a 
score of six more points. The goal 
was kicked bringing the tally to 14-0 
against us. The game ended soon af- 
terward. 

Wheelock made many nice gains 
for our team and kept F. & M. con- 
stantly on the lookout for long gains. 
Not a single back field man was in 
condition to play a hard game. Snave- 
ly's shoulder was not in good shape, 
Strickler's foot was hurt recently, 
and Pell had not been out to prac- 
tice on Friday on account of sick- 
ness. Lerew was on the side line 
with a sprained back and could not 
possibly get into the game. 

The final game of the season will 
be played on our home field next Sat- 
urday with the Carlisle Indian sec- 
ond team. The Indians always put 
up a hard game and make every min- 
ute of the contest interesting. F. & 
M. vs. L. V. line-up: 



L. V. 
Donahue, L. E. 
Mackert, L. T. 
Mickey, L. G. 
Von Berghy, C. 
Hollinger, R. G. 

(DeHuff) 
Statton, R. T. 
Schwartz, R. E. 

(Suavely) 
Strickler, Q. B. 
Wheelock, R. H. B. 
Snavely, L. H. B. 
Pell, F. B. 



F. & M. 
Detrich, L. E. 
Hartman, L. T. 
Connan, L. G. 
Diehl, C. 
Teske, R. G. 

Smith, R. T. 
Schaeffer, R. E. 

Mylin, Q. B. 
Gearhart, R. H.B. 
Hulse, L. H. B. 
Herrman, F. B. 



,You are correct it you get your 

LADIES' and CENTS' 
FURNISHINGS 

At KINPORTS', Annville, Pa. 

Students' Discount Packard & Radcliffe Shoes 

W, D. ELLIOTT 
Shoemaker 

Repairing neately done. Rubber work a 
specialty. 

Patronage Solicited 
Railroad St, Annville, Pa. 

LIVERY 

First Class Teams to 
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Parties a Specialty 

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WM. WALTZ 
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For Cakes and Confectionery 

GO TO 

Bowman's Bakery 

A FULL SUPFLY OF HALL'S CHOCO- 
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W. Main St. Annville, Pa. 

Home-Made Noodles, Peanut Butter 

H. B. FLOWERS 

Manufacturer of 

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Chips 

LEBANON. PA. 

Photographs 

Duplicate Photo- 
graphs can be la ad 
froioa the negative® 
made at Lebanon 
Valley College. 

Place orders witla 
Mr. A. L. Weaver. 

Special Prices giv- 
en students having 
Photographs made at 
our Studio. 

DIVES, POMEROY 
& STEWART 

READING, PA, 



COLLEGE NEWS 



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Ladies in the Halt are under the con- 
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Write for catalogue 
&ev. S. *D. Sossard, President 



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W. T. BRUBAKER, Manager. 
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PHILADELPHIA 



ITEMS OF INTEREST 

Mrs. Geo. Eppley, wife of the 
superintendent of the Hershey Choco- 
late Company, attended the Piano- 
forte-Lecture Recital last Tuesday. 

Mrs. Sara Strickler Bachman, class 
of 1912, and Miss Miriam Light, both 
of Lebanon, attended the recital last 
Tuesday evening. 

Miss Mary Spangler, of Lebanon, 
a member of the Sophomore Class, 
has been compelled to discontinue 
her work at the Conservatory on 
account of her nerves. 

Mrs. Brossman, a sister of Miss 
Catharine Ruth and Miss Anna Fry, 
'12, both of Boiling Springs, spent 
Sundav visiting Miss Ruth. 

Rev. E. W. Canoles, of Biglerville, 
Pa , visited school last week. 

Mr John Whitman, of Middletown, 
a pupil of Mrs. Von Berghy, of Har- 
risburg, our new teacher on the vio- 
lin visited L. Clarence Barnet on 
Thursday and Friday of last week 
and played a violin solo in chapel 
on Friday morning. Mr. Whitman 
proved to be a violinist of exception- 
al ability and was greeted by a 
heartv applause at the completion 
of the solo by the students, to which 
he very kindly responded with an en- 
core. 

Mr. Horace C. Moul, of Hanover, 
has enrolled and started his work 
at the Conservatory. 

Rose Gartner, of Williamsport, Pa., 
was a guest of Mrs. E. E. Sheldon 
at the Perry Recital. 

Mr. Faber Stengle, '15, has been 
elected chorister of the United Breth- 
ren choir of Hummelstown. 

Mr. L. Maxwell, of Plymouth, Pa., 
a former L. V. and State college foot- 
ball star, visited Coach Guyer last 
Thursday. 

Miss Flora Case has been on the 
sick list for the past few days. 

Dr. A. B. Statton, of Hagerstown, 
president of the college trustee board, 
visited school last Tuesday. 

Prof. Lehman, who was sick for 
the past week, is meeting his classes 
again. 

Miss Huber visited friends in Leb- 
anon over Sunday. 

Mrs. Painter, of Hershey, heard 
Sir Perry's recital last Tuesday night. 

Miss Adams spent the week-end in 
Philadelphia, seeing Shakespearean 
drama. 

Mrs. Frank Reber and sons, Fred- 
erick and Arthur ana Mr. and Mrs. 
Lewis Kerchner, all of Reading, vis- 
ited Mr. J. H. Reber over Sunday. 

Mr. Park Lutz spent Saturday and 
Sunday at Lancaster. 

Professor H. H. Shenk delivered 
the afternoon address at the Dauphin 
County Teachers Institute last Wed- 
nesday. Prof. Shenk spoke on Presi- 
dent Buchannon and enlightened the 
teachers on the personal traits of 
our Pennsylvania president. 

Mr. F. R. Saylor, reporter for the 
Hershey Weekly, witnessed the varsi- 
ty-scrub football game Thursday af- 
ternoon. 



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CLIONIAN ANNIVERSARY NUMBt,. 



COliliEGE 




LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



Volume V. Annville, Pa., Tuesday, November 25, 1913 Jio. 11 



Entered as second-class matter November 12, 1910, at the post orllee at Annville, Pa., under the act of March 3, 1879. 



Che Clionian Literary Society Successfully 

Celebrates fier Torty=tbird Anniversary 



After many weeks and days of 
anticipation, Clio outdid herself on 
Friday evening, November the twen- 
ty-first, when she celebrated her for- 
ty-third anniversary- Those who 
had spent lots of time in preparing 
for the event were fully satisfied 
with the results. The conservatory 
was crowded to the doors. Every one 
in the best of spirits and eager ex- 
pectation. Many visitors were 
among the number who gathered to 
near the speakers and they added 
much to the enjoyability of the oc- 
casion. 

The Conservatory and the Ladies' 
Dormitory were very beautifully dec- 
orated with chrysanthemums and 
greens. The feature in the decora- 
tions of th? chapel being "Clionian" 
spelt out in large letters made of 
chrysanthemums. The color scheme 
being gold and white, Clio's colors, 
the Ladies' Dormitory was very ar- 
tistically decorated. Immediately 
inside the door stood a large punch 
booth very carefully and elaborately 
built. Here two of Clio's loyal ones 
served punch, which every one seem- 
ed to enjoy. Clio Hall was simply 
decorated and the whole dormitory 
was thrown open to visitors. 

Keim's orchestra, of Lebanon, fur- 
nished the music for the occasion. 
Very beautiful and very much ap- 
preciated were the selections which 
they played. 

Promptly at 8.15, the chapel full 
to the doors, the orchestra began 
the exercises by playing "The Cathe- 
dral Chimes," by Arnold and Brown, 
while the speakers were ushered up- 
on the rostrum. The invocation was 
delivered by Rev. Joseph Daugherty. 
Then followed, an overture by R. 
^chlepogrell "Narcissus." The pro- 
gramme was continued by Josephine 
Urich, the president of Clio, who de- 
livered the President's address. Her 
oration, the subject of which was 
'Public Opinion," was very inter- 
esting and does much credit to Miss 
Urich. 

E. Mae Meyer played a piano solo, 
"La Cascade Etude de Concert" (Op. 




M. JOSEPH INK URICH 'U 

114) by F. Bendel. Miss Meyer, as 
every one knows is an excellent 
pianist, and she played unusually 
well on Friday night. 

Then followed an orailon "The 
Change in the Status of Women" by 
Blanche M. Risser. This oration was 
a very good one and well delivered. 
Every now and then a vein of humor 
shown forth which made it highly 
entertaining and interesting. 

Another oration followed "Educa- 
tion in a Democracy by Catharine 
B. Bachman. This too was a great 
success. Miss Bachman gave a fine 
and well thought out oration which 
brought much credit to herself and 
to Clio through her. 

Ruth E. Engle, a very promising 
violinist, played a violin solo, "Petite 
Historia" Op. 35 No. 4 by R. Frime. 
This number was also very well ren- 
dered and much appreciated. 

"The Crackajack Story" by Elta 
M. Weaver held the audience in de- 
lightful attention. The reading was 
a good one and the way in which it 
was given did much credit to Miss 



Weaver. She entered into the spir- 
it of the story and gave to it herself, 
which could not help but make it a 
good one. 

The lact literary number on the 
program was an essay on "The Value 
of China in Modern Civilization" by 
Martha E. Snyder. This essay show- 
ed great care and preparation and 
was a very interesting one. 

A most enjoyable feature of the 
programme was Schubert's chorus 
"Whither" by the Ladies' Glee Club. 
Although the club has lost many 
of its singers and there are many 
new voices; nevertheless it acquitted 
itself most creditably. 

After t he rendition of "Le Seen t" 
by the orchestra the audience dis- 
persed and proceeded to the Ladies' 
Dormitory where refreshments were 
served. 

Larene R. Etr/le '15. had charge 
of the refreshments. Catharine B. 
Bachman, '14, was chairman of the 
decorating committee of the dormi- 
tory, and Esther Hintzelman, '16, of 
the conservatory. 

PRESIDENT S ADDRESS 

The mental and moral attributes 
which distinguish the individual and 
determine character and viewpoint, 
in society are combined and blended 
into a product more powerful which 
is called common feeling, general de- 
sire, or moral sense, and indicates 
the general will of the community 
which collectively is called the social 
mind. It is not expressed by any in- 
individual, any newspaper, or any 
mob. But it is felt, and while it is 
often insulted and defied, in the long 
run it governs and guides. 

In a community some form of 
wrong or evil may be felt as a de- 
pressing influence long before it is 
really perceived because no one per- 
son knows its extent or the variety 
of its pliares. But when experiences 
are compared, when each man knows 
all that his fellows know and what 
they think about the matter, then 
the trouble stand forth as an ob- 



COLLEGE NEWS 



ject of perception. As they pass 
judgment upon it there is the be- 
ginning of a community conscious- 
ness. 

The genesis of public opinion de- 
pends upon intellectual contact and 
communication which results in the 
recognition of general truths. Where 
intercourse barely exists, as it is 
among the Cumberland Mountains of 
Tennessee, there is no public opin- 
ion. Where population is relatively 
dense it is highly developed. There- 
fore it is dependent upon a general 
diffusion of education which will de- 
velop relations of justice and sym- 
pathy between the well-to-do and 
poorer classes. 

It is true that the spirit rather I 
than the form of republicanism is 
necessary. However, republican in 
spirit a community may be, and how- 
ever intelligent its members, its pub- 
lic opinion is moulded by a few lead- 
ing personalities. Public meetings 
and the press organize it and extend 
its power, but even these are guid- 
ed by a few thoughtful minds who 
have the welfare of the community 
at heart, or manipulated by a few 
clever men, whose social influence 
as a rule is underestimated. 

By means of the modern newspaper 
the public conscience may be educat- 
ed, or it may be misled. The press 
is becoming the daily judgment of 
society. A glaring light of publicity 
is shed by it over all humanity. It 
has the great power of suggestion, 
because having many readers it can 
put the same thought into many 
minds at the same time. The press 
became an important organ of pub- 
lic opinion during the anti-slavery 
agitation in the United States. It 
has made its deepest impression when 
it has been the mouthpiece of a com- 
manding personality — a Garrison, a 
Greely, or a Curtis. It is at once an 
expression of existing view and a 
factor in further molding the com- 
mon judgment. Published letters, in- 
terviews, platform utterances are 
straws indicating the set of the cur- 
rent of public opinion. Primarily 
the newspaper is not really a direct- 
ing force as much as it is a mirror, 
reflecting the interests, purposes, and 
opinions of the larger or smaller part 
of the community. But through this 
reflection decision is influenced, opin- 
ion is formed, and impulse is given 
toward a course of action. 

In China for a long time the idea 
prevailed that women must have 
their feet bound. But through edu- 
cation they have been brought to see 
the harmful effects of the custom 
and consequently have dropped it. 

Public opinion can be both help- 
ful and harmful. In th e Fiji Islands 
cannibalism was stopped through the 
teachings of missionaries who influ- 
enced against it. In another place 
the horse thief was punished with 
hanging — the safety of the horses be- 
ing considered more important than 
the life of the individual. 




E. .MAY MEYER '14 



Public opinion expresses the wis- 
dom of the whole which is modified 
by condition, by the selfish interest 
of the mass, and too often by the 
passions of the mob. It must be re- 
membered that a mob of human be- 
ings does not express the intellect 
of the community, but the hatred of 
passion. The mob is in reality a 
hunting pack a reversion of human 
beings to the savage state of hatred 
and destruction. 

Professor Shaler, of Harvard, says 
that public opinion finds formal, defi- 
nite and chrystallized expression in 
certain laws, for instance the laws 
that guard property and sanctify 
marriage, thus protecting women and 
children; the laws that prevent the 
use of poison in warfare and of tor- 
ture in judicial investigations. 

Nothing is harder to break when 
outgrown than public opinion that 
has taken the form of law and tradi- 
tion. Only public opinion itself is 
strong enough to destroy and break 
down the barriers that public opin- 
ion has created. 

It was public opinion, not love of 
the republic that kept Caesar from 
accepting the crown. One of the 
strongest individuals that ever lived, 
perhaps, was Cromwell. He never 
lost a battle, mental or physical. 
But it was not the force of intelli- 
gence stored away in his round head 
that gave him his power. It was 
public opinion that had enough of 
the reign of Charles and the de- 
bauchery, ignorance, and misery that 
went with it. 

Public opinion on the one hand 
has burned many people at the stake 
for witchcraft, and thrown the great- 
est men into judgment, while on the 
other hand it has struck the most 
powerful blows for liberty, equality, 
and justice. 

Of course public opinion can be 
no wiser than the wisdom of the 
day, no more just than the justice 
of the day, no more kind than the 
kindness of the day. 



But public opinion is the conscience 
of the Human Race and is intelli- 
gence. As the race progresses pub- 
lic opinion becomes higher, fairer, 
more consistent. Although it is 
sometimes cruel, frequently ignor- 
ant, often mistaken, yet because 

"Right is right, since God is God, 
and Right the day will win," it is the 
final protection and the greatest pow- 
er of the people. For the social con- 
sciousness as soon as it recognizes 
what is necessary for the highest 
good of the community will inevita- 
bly seek the attainment of that good. 

The exercises this evening com- 
memorate the forty-third anniver- 
sary of the Clionian Literary Society. 
Its ideals and standards with the 
motto, "Virtute et Fide," have been 
maintained and cherished for nearly 
half a century. Back in 1870 the 
girls of the college organized this 
society for the purpose of cultivat- 
ing friendship, developing the spirit 
of co-operation, and promoting lit- 
erary and musicale talent and mental 
improvement. During the whole 
course of its existence it has been at- 
tended with success. 

Now it affords me great pleasure, 
in behalf of the Clionian Literary So- 
ciety, to extend to one and all a cor- 
dial welcome to these anniversary 
exercises. 



THE CHANGE IN THE STATUS OF 
WOMAN. 

Our age represents the highest 
type of civilization ever attained to, 
and democracy, which is a necessary 
part of a high state of civilization, 
has become world-wide. One of the 
most essential parts of the spread of 
democracy has always been the ele- 
vation of the position of woman. 
Therefore, in our day the question 
of woman's status and influence can- 
not fail to be of interest. 

"Serious" historians have always 
neglected woman — more than one- 
half of humanity — as a subject un- 
worthy of their meditations. But 
history is the story of achievement, 
you say, and woman has done little 
or nothing to merit mention. His- 
tory, as written, is a record of mas- 
culine achievement — wars, battles, 
intrigues, and dynasties go to make 
up the greater part of it. In these, 
it is true, woman has played a very 
small part. But in every age there 
have been women who have risen 
above their sisters and whose names 
have gone down in history for the 
great influence they had upon the 
political life of their people. Mar- 
vellous Cleopatra of Egypt satisfied 
her boundless ambition by using her 
beauty, brilliance, and charm to make 
the world's heroes her playthings. 
History has called Joan of Arc the 
"savior of fifteenth century France" 
for she was the inspiration and lead- 
er of the movement for national re- 
organization. You say neither has 
woman made literature, nor painted, 
nor invented. But there have been 



COLLEGE NEWS 



women who won fame for their work 
in the fields of literature and art, such 
as George Eliot, George Sand, Rosa 
Bonheur, Mrs. Browning, and Sappho, 
the poet of ancient Greece whom 
Plato called "the tenth Muse." We 
admit that there are but a few. But 
has opportunity been open to wom- 
en? What has been the position al- 
lowed to her through the centuries? 

Man all through the past ages, has 
considered woman a greatly inferior 
being. Indeed, at a certain time in 
her history it was a matter of earnest 
discussion with the early fathers of 
the church as to whether she had a 
sour or not. One of these, Chrysos- 
tum, is quoted as saying: "What is 
woman but an enemy of friendship, 
an unavoidable punishment, a neces- 
sary evil, a natural temptation, a 
desirable affliction, a constantly 
flouring source of tears, a wicked 
work of nature covered with a shin- 
ing varnish." The picture is round- 
ed out by a remark by Tiberius 
Gracchus: "If we could live with- 
out wives we should be rid of that 
nuisance; but since nature has de- 
creed that we can neither live com- 
fortably with them nor live at all 
without them, we must even look 
rather to our permanent interests 
than to a passing pleasure." 

Let us trace for a moment the 
varying status of this "necessary 
evil," this "desirable affliction." 
Woman in the past ages has rarely 
enjoyed either leisure or independ- 
ence. In primitive society woman 
performed most of the work, carried 
on the industries almost exclusively. 
She did the spinning, weaving, and 
the agricultural work in addition to 
her domestic duties. She was the 
beast of burden for the tribe, but 
she was the ruling power also. Wom- 
an seems to have had the ascendancy 
among the barbaric peoples, for it 
was she who had the deciding of 
the most important questions. She 
gave her child her name, for the line 
of descent was through the maternal 
side. 

Woman among the ancient peoples 
seems to have enjoyed a certain 
amount of political power. Among 
the early Germanic tribes woman 
occupied a high position politically 
for she took part in the council, held 
property, and had in every way equal 
Political rights with man. The 
ancient Egyptians accorded woman 
equal political rights and also edu- 
cated her. The Roman woman was 
under the superintendence all her 
!ife of either father, husband, or 
brother, but she was given the same 
opportunities for education as her 
brothers and the privilege of free 
Public expression was hers. 

But it remained for Christianity to 
br ing the real break of dawn for 
womanhood. Though great political 
Power was hers before, she lived in 
a state of social subjection. What 
greater degradation for woman could 
there be than the polygamous mar- 



riages of the ancients? Thousands 
of women did not occupy the position 
of wives, for every household had its 
retinue of concubines and slaves. 
Christ brought salvation for woman, 
from the wrongs she suffered, from 
the state, worse than slavery, in 
which the great majority of women 
lived. Christ's attitude towards 
woman marked the beginning of a 
new life, a new progress for her. 
Though woman during the centuries 
in which the influence of Christian- 
ity has been at work has enjoyed 
little political power it has been be- 
cause of the desire to protect her. 
This exclusion of woman from any- 
thing from domestic circles has tend- 
ed to make the upward progress of 
womankind slow. 

How refreshing, then, it is to turn 
from our sister of the past, of an in- 
ferior social status and with a lim- 
ited influence, to the woman of to- 
day, in a position of equality and 
with a wonderful influence in the 




BLANCHE M. RISSER '14 

world's social development. 

One of the most significant and 
far-reaching developments of our 
present day progress is the awaken- 
ing of the woman of the Orient. The 
woman of the East has farther to go 
than her sister of the West, but 
she has already taken the first steps 
in the direction of a larger participa- 
tion in the life of her people. In 
Japan and China women are enter- 
ing the colleges and universities, 
business and professions, and are tak- 
ing an active part in public life. 

Here again we see uie agency of 
Christianity in bringing about bet- 
ter things for woman, for these new 
opportunities have come to her only 
since the beginnings of missionary 
work in China half a century ago. 
One of the first steps forward was 
the crusade two decades ago against 
the binding of the feet. Other indi- 
cations of woman's progress are the 
formal recognition by the government 



of her right to an education, the es- 
tablishment of schools for her, and 
the publication of newspapers edited 
by women. 

As a matter of historical fact, the 
new woman of China is not quite 
new. The position of the Chinese 
woman has always been mgn. Care- 
ful students of tl:e social life of 
China have always declared that the 
position of woman in China is even 
higher than that of many of her 
western sisters, that China is a coun- 
try which respects and values her 
women exceedingly, a country where 
woman's power is strong. The Jap- 
anese woman's influence has always 
been particularly felt in literature, 
but recently, she, like her more ad- 
vanced sisters, has entered the fields 
of medicine, business and teaching 
and has labored with quite as much 
success as they. 

Nor are Japan and China the only 
countries in whose social revolutions 
woman is playing an important 
part. The Indian woman is the soul 
of the nationalist movement. Were 
it not for her help and guidance the 
whole movement for political and in- 
dustrial regeneration would fall. 
With the regeneration of half her 
population, — her women — by the 
purification of her marriage institu- 
tion, the elevation of the status of 
her women, and the spread of educa- 
tion among them, India is preparing 
to take a new place among the na- 
tions, is being born anew. The stir- 
lings of this vast movement are be- 
ing felt all over Asia. The women 
c" remote Persia and Turkey and 
even benighted Egypt are awaking. 

The tsrna "American Woman" h?s 
been declared by a certain writer 
■.o be synonymous with the term 
"New Woman." Nor is the state- 
ment extravagant, for the term "New 
Woman" signifies a woman who 
breaks away from the traditions of 
womankind and acquires new duties 
and occupations, — all of which the 
American woman stands for. She is 
unique, for nowhere among the wom- 
en of the world is found her coun- 
terpart. Her distinctive position is 
the result of four advantages:' Op- 
portunity for education, freedom in 
choosing occupation, legal equality, 
and abundance of leisure. She has 
been trained to make a living, she 
has many opportunities for employ- 
ment, and she is therefore self-reliant 
and dependent on no one for her 
support if she chooses; while she is 
as well fitted to maintain a home, for 
her education can make her an effec- 
tive wife and mother. The American 
woman has the opportunity as an in- 
dependent human being — not in one 
sphere but in many— to advance her- 
self, and with herself her people. 

The world abounds in work, a great 
deal of which will not be done un- 
less it is done by woman. She will 
strike out according to her natural 
inclinations and will cultivate fields 
that man neglects. Woman through 
Continued on page 4 



COLLEGE NEWS 



College f4euus 



Issued weekly during 1 ihe College 
Vear by the Students of Lebanon 
Valley College 

EDITOR-IN-CITTEF 
R. M. WKIDLER '14 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 
FLORENCE MENTZ '15 

John b. lyter '14 
Social 

ESTA WAREHEIM '16 

Athletics 
PHILO STATTON '15 

Alumni 
PAUL STRICKLEP. '14 

Music 

RAY P. CAMPBELL '16 

BUSINESS MANAGER 

HARRY CHARLTON 'U 



THANKSGIVING. 

Thanksgiving which is distinctive- 
ly an American institution has its 
special significance and associations, 
ft is distinctively American because 
its beginnings carries us back to the 
days when our Pilgrim and Puritan 
forefathers were battling with ob- 
stacles almost unsurmountable in or- 
der that they could found a colony 
where they could have freedom to 
worship God. In its earliest days 
it was purely a religious occasion set 
opart by mutual agreement, but lat- 
er developments showed it to be a 
combination of religious exercises 
rnd feasting. Such a Thanksgiving 
was first proclaimed by Governor 
Pradford in November, 1629, after a 
-pr-d New England harvest. Thus it 
followed tint an occasion such as In- 
dian victory, e-ood harvest or settle- 
ment of a religious dispute was cele- 
brated by a general thanksgiving] 
T^metimes periods of several years 
elapsed without such a celebration 
then again two might be celebrated 
in the same year. Nations with an 
established church nave their feast 
d3ys set apart by law, but America 
wi*h her free church and state has 
no such calendar of festivals. Yet 
in American usage there has grown 
tj*> the custom of annual celebrations 
"T^m all dangers of conflict be- 
1 pod Q and church but which 
si - & 'lr'r relation and obligations 
t" ~ o'i ( her. From the colonial 
d ; l- dov. a to Lincoln the practice 
of national thanksgiving was very 
irregular but after Lincoln proclaim- 
ed a national thanksgiving after the 
victories of Gettysburg and Vicks- 
burg and followed it up the next year 
by a similar proclamation no presi- 
dent has broken the precedent. The 
word hints at the gratitude that 
should be felt for the blessings of 
a free "country, for our free institu- 
tions of learning and public schools, 
for the influence of home and friends 
and for the blessing of life itself. 



THE CHANGE IN THE 

STATUS OF WOMAN 

Continued from page- 3 



the ages has shown that she has a 
capacity for work. Surely if this 
capacity he united with opportunity, 
if her ability be given an outlet, she 
will be able to continue her ad- 
vance and to take her place as an in- 
dividual in the vanguard of an ad- 
vancing civilization. 

"Let her make herself her own 
To give or keep, to live and learn 
and be 

All that not harms distinctive wom- 
anhood." 

EDUCATION IN A DEMOCRACY. 

Today we live in a new and stir- 
ring era, characterized by an un- 
paralled material progress. Science 




C ATll AR1NE B, BACH MAN '14 



has opened up new marvels, new in- 
vention-. Interests formerly limit- 
ed to scholars are now the common 
knowledge of all educated men. 
Rut the most striking feature is the 
growth of democracy through edu- 
cation. 

Notwithstanding this truth, democ- 
racy is not new, Greece and Rome 
had democracies, great systems, 
which, however, finally crumbled in- 
to ruins. In the Middle Ages popu- 
lar government was regarded as im- 
possible. Even at the time when 
our little democracy was formed 
European nations viewed It wit : con- 
tempt, but now, they too, have to 
some degree, established governments 
along democratic lines. We must 
understand that when the people had 
no political power, for them there 
were no political requirements, no 
necessity for an educational ideal. 
Those in whom the power was vest- 



ed reigned supreme, never thinking 
it possible that the people could act 
for the welfare of their country. Rut 
now, as the power has passed from 
the few to the many, the many have 
realized the need of such an ideal 
for the masses that they may be fit- 
ted to govern. 

This new American democracy is 
not founded on slave labor as was 
the democracy of Greece, nor on the 
exclusion of certain classes from citi- 
zenship, as in the democracy of 
Rome. Neither was it the sudden in- 
novation of theory, but the slow re- 
sult of growth. Ours is an attempt 
to realize the first meaning of the 
word; a rule by a people qualified to 
rule. Doubtless the best definition 
ever given for democracy is "the 
government of the people, by the peo- 
ple, for the people," while one of 
America's greatest men said that 
"Democracy meant not 'I'm as good 
as you are,' but 'You're as good as I 
am.' " 

The early Americans loved knowl- 
edge as well as freedom, and sought 
to establish the firmest basis for a 
new government, by making educa- 
tion a part of the government, which 
action, stimulates the growth of 
democratic principles and is stimulat- 
ed by them. They believed that 
education is leading human souls to 
what is best, and making what is 
bsst out of them, for the training 
which makes men happiest in them- 
selves also makes them most service- 
able to others. 

With such a beginning as our an- 
cestors gave us, our maxim today 
thould be, what it for many years 
has been that every child has a right 
to an education. Laws enforcing 
this maxim have been passed, since 
the right to an education, rests, not 
only upon the relation of child to 
parent, but also upon the relation of 
child to state, for the value of a citi- 
zen depends much upon his honesty 
and sympathy, responsibility and in- 
" telligence. Every child today is fit- 
ting himself to be a citizen just as 
he is to be a wage earner. He is 
preparing to take part in the making 
of our institutions, in the government 
of ourselves and our fellow men. 

To fit ourselves to be citizens of 
a growing commonwealth we must 
study and read; we must familiarize 
ourselves with the record of the deeds 
of great men in othtr times and in 
other nations, for the new problems 
which come up day after day only 
increase the necessity of knowing 
what others have done. 

The public schools in America en- 
deavor to produce men and women 
fit for citizenship. True, they do aim 
to extend scientific and literary 
knowledge, but they also endeavor 
to inculcate in the pupil an under- 
standing of the moral and political 
life of a democratic state. As a 
means of furthering democracy the 
free public school brings children of 



COLLEGE NEWS 



all classes and conditions together. 
In the school room the child of the 
banker and the child of the black- 
smith meet on an equal basis. To- 
gether they learn the real meaning 
of patriotism and together they plan 
to overcome future diniculties. There 
are no longer in the public school 
the lower, the middle and the upper 
classes. The child of poverty is not 
scorned by the child of wealth. Their 
school life leads steadily up to the 
life of the world outside. The school 
itself, is a republic of childhood 
where the right of each individual 
to full development is recognized. 
Here the child of German parentage 
becomes as intensely patriotic, as in- 
tensely American as the child of Pil- 
grim ancestry. The poor and the 
rich, the slow and the precocious are 
brought together. They gain an un- 
derstanding of human character, and 
they learn to feel human sympathy 
by this association. They also learn 
that strength, will, and intelligence, 
rather than money and social posi- 
tion, constitute the essentials of life. 
Seldom in America do we see the 
child from the humble home stand 
aside to let the child of wealth reach 
the highest achievements. No in- 
deed! the child has been trained in a 
democratic school. He knows and 
feels that his chance of success rests 
upon himself, regardless of his par- 
ents social or financial circumstances. 
Moment by moment his ideals are 
beckoning him onward and upward. 
He may not think of his home con- 
ditions. Very often the children of 
the poor grapple with intellectual 
problems better than the children of 
the rich, the reason being that they 
are early thrown upon their own re- 
sources and compelled to struggle, 
while the children of the rich, 
through a mistaken kindness are pro- 
tected from such hardships. We must 
remember that when a child is robbed 
of the experience of life, he is robbed 
of the education that experience 
gives. Industrial and trade train- 
ing, as well as literary and classical 
training, in the public scliool are con- 
sistent with genuine democracy, and 
do not mean the separation of the 
people into occupational classes. We 
realize more every day that no other 
agency than the public school can 
meet the demands of the new condi- 
tions for efficient citizens. They 
know that to educate the intelli- 
gence, sympathy, and humanity is to 
enlarge the horizon of its desires. 
Therefore each governmental enter- 
prise must go deeper in order to sat- 
isfy those desires in so far as they 
ar e legitimate. 

When a child is brought up in a 
school amidst democratic conditions, 
ar id under the guidance of broad- 
minded and noble instructors, not 
°nly will he be self-respecting, but. 
he will respect his fellow beings as 
well. Most naturally the pupil looks 
U P to his instructor as a type worthy 
of imitation, if the teacher's ideals 



are high, the result to the pupil is 
excellent. The aspiration becomes a 
habit, and the habit grows to be a 
part of the pupil. The high ideals 
thus inspired by the instructor raise 
the honesty, reliability, intelligence 
and morals of the pupil, which In 
manhood fit him for citizenship in a 
democracy. 

The more honest, the more intel- 
ligent are the citizens produced in 
the schools of America, the firmer 
will stand the foundation of her 
democracy. "The highest test of a 
civilization," according to Emerson, 
"Is not the census, nor the size of 
the cities, nor the crops; no! but 
the kind of men and women a coun- 
try turns out." So far the American 
democracy is the highest step of mod- 
ern civilization, and the greatest aid 
in producing qualified citizens for 
this, our democracy, is the public 
schccl. 




ELTA WEAVER 'l(i 



"THE CRACKAJACK STORY" 

(By Harold Kellock). 

A synopsis of the story is as fol- 
lows: 

Billy Doing's only interests were 
his paper, "The Evening Planet," of 
which he was city editor, his wife 
and his daughter Lucy. Douglass, the 
managing editor, as excitable as 
Doing was calm, was always look- 
ing for sensational copy. His lat- 
est "roar" was a complaint against 
the teaching of cooking, sewing and 
swimming in the public schools. 

Doing's wife and daughter were 
on the excursion steamer "Abraham 
Lincoln" for a day's outing, so Do- 
ing's feeings can be imagined rather 
than described when he is told over 
the telephone that this very steamer 
is on fire and the men, women and 
children on board were being burned 
to death in the old fire trap or were 
drowning overboard. Doing calmly 
sent all his available staff to the 
scene of the disaster and waited. Re- 
ports soon came in over the phone. 
Finally the names of the identified 
dead were given Doing by a report- 



er. Among the names were "Mrs. 
William Doing and a ten-year-old 
girl, supposed to be her daughter." 
The whole office force by this time 
knew of Doing's misfortune and mar- 
velled at his cool and calm nerve. 
He nevertheless worked on "I will 
get this edition out first and then 
buy a pistol, shoot the directors of 
the steamboat company, the govern- 
ment inspectors and then probably 
myself," said Doing. 

Before the first edition was ready 
for press the telephone bell rang 
again and a woman's voice asked, "Is 
that the city desk?" And then Do- 
ing's wife explained how Lucy, who 
had learned to swim in the public 
schools, had saved both of their lives. 
The reaction was too much for Do- 
ing and after putting a thick blue 
pencil mark through his wife's and 
daughter's names on the list of iden- 
tified dead, Doing gave way to a 
paroxysm of sobs and hysterical 
laughter. After this demonstration 
Douglass was content to allow the fads 
and frills to be taught in the public 
schools. 



THE VALUE OF CHINA IN MOD- 
ERN CIVILIZATION. 

One of the oldest and most inter- 
esting countries of the world is the 
one located in the Par East ana 
known geographically as China. 
Long before America was discovered, 
long before the modern powers of 
Europe had gained any prominence 
as nations, China was known as a 
great empire. She is one of the most 
interesting of countries partly be- 
cause of her natural resources, part- 
ly because of the numbers, curious 
tendencies and ideals of her people, 
but chiefly because of what it is pos- 
sible for her to become under cer- 
tain conditions. 

The physical characteristics are 
extremely auspicious for any land, 
because of her abundance of water 
supply owing to her many rivers, 
China is as well watered as any 
country in the world. She is rich 
in minerals. Gold, though not 
thought to be very abundant, is ob- 
tained by washing the sand of sev- 
eral of the rivers, particularly those 
of the upper branch of the Yang-tse. 
Silver also is found, as well as cop- 
per, mercury and quick silver. Some 
authorities reckon the coal fiields of 
China as equal in value to all the 
other coal fields of the world to- 
gether, and sometime they must cer- 
tainly become of immense economic 
importance to the country. 

In all the arts necessary to the 
comfort of life and in not a few of 
those conducive to luxury, the 
Chinese have made considerable pro- 
gress. One peculiarity in these pro- 
cesses is the fact that in nearly all 
industries, the great moving power 
is manual labor. 

Then China should be of vital in- 
terest to all nations for this one fact 



COLLEGE NEWS 



alone, that probably one-fourth of 
all the people on the face of the 
globe dwell within her borders. In 
the whole Chinese empire, the popu- 
lation has been recently estimated 
at 426,000,000 inhabitants and in 
China proper about 407,000,000. 
Compare this with the population of 
Pennsylvania which in 1900 was 6,- 
301,115 and you see that China 
proper contains almost 38 times as 
many people in her borders as are 
in our Keystone State. 

As I said before, the Chinese are 
the most curious and the most inter- 
esting of peoples. In the minds of 
some learned writers on this subject 
it has been a question whether the 
Chinese could be understood and de- 
scribed by the Western mind. Why 
are they curious? What influences 
and conditions have made them 
what they are? According to Rob- 
ert E. Speer, secretary of the Pres- 
byterian Board of Foreign Missions, 
the Chinese are the most homo- 
geneous people in the world; their 
language is spoken by more human 
beings than any other in the world, 
and it is written in the rock; it is 
a country where there is a greater 
unification of thought than in any 
other country in the world; it is a 
country where the maxims of the 
great sages, coming down memorized 
have permeated the whole people un- 
til their knowledge is rattier an in- 
stinct than an acquirement. It is a 
people loyal while living, and whose 
last prayer when dying is to sleep 
in the sacred soil of their fathers. 
It is a land of scholars and of 
schools, a land without caste for they 
destroyed their feudal system two 
thousand one hundred years ago, and 
they built up their great structure 
of civilization on the great idea that 
the people are the source of power. 
Scholarship is made a test of merit. 
A few years ago the University of 
London admitted to its initial exam- 
inations annually about 1400 candi- 
dates, and passed one-half. The 
Government examinations of China 
at the same time admitted about 2,- 
000,000 annually, and passed one per 
cent. 

In the Chinese mind Confucius is 
all-wise. All the so-called wisdom 
of China is contained in the classics 
compiled by Confucius. It is Con- 
fucianism which has limited the 
horizon of men to the w : sdom of 
twenty -five years ago. This doc- 
trine concerns man as a member of 
society and the object of its teach- 
ing is to lead him Into uiose paths 
of rectitude which might best con- 
tribute to his own hnnoiness and to 
the well-being o r that community of 
which he form: n part. Man, it 
holds, is born gcoc\ and is endowed 
with qualities w' ich, when cultivat- 
ed and improved by watchfulness 
and self-restraint mi lit enable him 
to acquire god-like wisdom and to 
become the equal of Heaven. Con- 
fucianism recognizes no relation to 



a living God. It ignores the plain- 
est facts of moral character. It has 
no serious idea of sin, and indeed no 
deeper insight at all. It cannot ex- 
plain death. It holds truth of light 
account. It presupposes and toler- 
ates polygamy and sanctions poly- 
theism. It confounds ethics with ex- 
ternal ceremonies and reduces social 
life to tyranny. It rises at the high- 
est no higher than the worship of 
genius, the deification of man. Is 
not the religion alone of the Chinese 
enough to make them a peculiar peo- 
ple? 

Another factor in Chinese life is 
the use of opium. The habitual use 
of opium as a narcotic drug is com- 
mon in most countries, and particu- 
larly so in China, India, Turkey, the 
Philippines and the Malay Archi- 
pelago. The great source whence 
China has always derived its opium 
has been India, where since 1793, 
the drug has been a government 
monopoly, the cultivators being paid 
at a fixed rate for their crops for 
exportation to China. The trade was 
contraband, the Chinese government 
having in 1796 prohibited the im- 
portation of opium. In March, 1839, 
the Chinese authoiities forbade all 
foreigners to quit Canton, and or- 
dered them to deliver up the opium 
in their possession, which was de- 
stroyed. War with Great Britain re- 
sulted, which ended in the defeat of 
the Chinese, who were obliged to 
pay indemnity for the opium. They 
have since been compelled to admit 
it. Now in China probably one per 
cent, of the entire population smoke 
opium, but the habit is growing rap- 
idly. By a local law of the church, 
all Roman Catholics are forbidden to 
engage in the cultivation, sale or 
smoking of opium. It is universally 
recognized as a great evil through- 
out China, causing poverty among 
the lower classes and dimunition of 
the energy and a lowering of the 
moral tone of the higher classes. 

A third factor which helps to make 
the Chinese a peculiar people is the 
fact that lor so many years China 
had no intercourse with the out- 
side world. China could never un- 
derstand why other nations did not 
keep their hands off, so to speak. 
Her seclusion made her suspicious. 
According to the Chinese, Great 
Britain, Prance, Germany and all 
foreign nations desired intercourse 
with China simply to get some of 
her territory and power. This was 
the cause of the Boxer Uprising in 
China. The Boxers are members of 
a powerful secret society in China 
whose avowed object is the driving 
out from their country of all Europe- 
ans or other foreigners. The active 
efforts of American and European 
missionaries and the constant en- 
croachments upon Chinese territory 
by European countries appear to be 
responsible in great measure for the 
establishment of the society. The 
coming into China and the taking- 



possession of some of her territory 
by Germany, Russia, England and 
France hastened on the first demon- 
strations of the Boxers. Thus, the 
Boxer movement presents itself large- 
ly under the aspect or a political up- 
rising against foreign aggression, a 
fact which goes far to account for 
the rapidity and thoroughness of its 
operations in 1900. The motto of 
these Boxers was, "Uphold the dy- 
nasty, drive out the foreigners." 
Empress Dowager was supposed to 
be on the side of the Boxers although 
the government was ready and will- 
ing to crush this movement, if pos- 
sible. 

In May, 1900, the Boxers made 
an attack upon the Chinese Capital 
and remained unchecked by the 
Manchu Military Forces of the em- 
pire. The Manchurians were also al- 
leged to be in sympathy with the 
Boxer movement. 

In June, 1900, Peking was reduc- 
ed to a state of siege by the Boxers. 
The position of the foreigners in the 
capital became precarious. The en- 
tire diplomatic corps was cut off from 
communication with the outside 
world. Thus cut off, Peking was a 
scene of turbulence and the centre 
of wild rumor. 

On July 20 the powers made a 
categorical demand to be placed in 
communication with their diplomatic 
representatives and on July 23 China 
appealed to the United States. From 
this, it can easily be seen that China 
is looking to our United States and 
with more respect, admiration and 
confidence than she is to any other 
nation in the world. 

How can we help these people? 
What do they need from us? First, 
they need to adopt western methods 
of progress. No nation in the world 
is so frugal, so economical as the 
Chinese and hence she should be 
among the most prosperous of the 
peoples of the earth. This epoch 
in Chinese history will be reached 
when there is with them a balance 
of virtues. The Occident must teach 
them this. Some progress has been 
made, but there is a vast amount of 
work along this line yet to be done. 
Secondly, the Chinese need Christ 
and Christianity. Whatever modifi- 
cations China has made in her re- 
ligious system are for the most part 
external, and if China is to be of 
any value in modern civilization, the 
western world, especially America 
and the Christian people all over the 
world, must come to a realization of 
the fact that China's doors are now 
open and that an opportunity, like 
the present one, if not taken advan- 
tage of, may never occur again. 

Just one short illustration to show 
what Christ can do in the hearts of 
the Chinese. As you know, mission 
schools have been established in 
China as well as in other foreign 
countries. Here the students deny 
themselves many things for the privi- 
lege of going to the mission and of 



COLLEGE NEWS 



studying about Christ as well as 
studying the common school 
branches. Many of these Chinese stu- 
dents have been converted to our 
faith. During the Boxer uprising, 
one of these Chinese boys disguised 
himself as the missionary who was 
head of the particular mission school 
to which he belonged. He had heard 
that the Boxers were seeking the 
missionary's life and deliberately 
gave his life for that of the mis- 
sionary's. Christ said, "Greater love 
hath no man than this than that a 
man lay down his life for his 
friends." If this is the spirit of 
Christianity displayed in these 
Chinese youths, is not China worthy 
of our interest, our time, our pray- 
ers and our national and Christian 
love? 



NOTICE 

The Clionian Literary Society 
wishes to make apologies to the fac- 
ulty students, and friends for not 
having sent out engraved invitations 
to its Forty-third Anniversary. The 
chairman of the invitation commit- 
tee had given her order early but it 
was delayed at the engravers. 



MISS CLIPPINGER ENTERTAINS. 

On Saturday night Miss Florence 
Clippinger, '13, entertained the Girls' 
College Class of the U. B. Sunday 
School at the home of Mr. Cyrus 
Shenk. The entire house was giv- 
en over to the girls, who amused 
themselves by making candy and 
playing games. The twenty-five 
girls present all spent a very pleas- 
ant evening. 

RWRAHTBOYiTS 

Raw Oysters at "Ussy's" 

OR EAT 'EM STEWED OR FRIED JUST AS 
YOU REFER 

^ S. MILLER W. MAIN ST. 

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Main Street 



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Get Your Shoes Repaired al 
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EAST MAIN STREET 

Shop Work done while you wait, 
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CONTRACTORS and BUILDERS 

Dealers in 
LUMBER and COAL - ANNVILLE, PA. 



VHEELOCK SAVES L. V. C. 

LAST GAME 

Wheelock, our Indian halfback, 
made himself the idol of every stu- 
dent when by his stellar playing, 
saved Lebanon Valley from a defeat 
in the last game of the season. The 
Indian second team put up a much 
stronger game than the score indi- 
cates, for it was not until the last 
quarter that the winning points were 
scored. 

L. V. was in bad condition for the 
game, Capt. Strickler being out of 
the line-up, Lerew being practically 
powerless at left end on account of 
his injured back, and Wheelock not 
in his place. For three quarters the 
Indians ploughed thru our line at 
win succeeding in scoring one touch- 
down and in kicking one field goal. 
Our team put up a poorer exhibition 
of football in this game than in any 
other game this season. The line 
was pushed back time after time and 
the old Indian 'cross-buck' play was 
used more than once for a good gain. 
The blue and white team had an off 
day and showed mighty little of the 
football knowledge that a season's 
experience should have taught them. 

At the beginning of the fourth 
quarter the score stood 10-0 in the 
Indians favor and chances were pret- 
ty bUie for a celebration of victory in 
Annville. 

Suddenly, the sidelines saw a fig- 
ure in a football suit emerge from 
the crowd and make his way on the 
field. In an instant, there was a 
cheer which, succeeded by others, 
grew into a roar as everyone reco- 
gnized in this player, Wheelock the 
favorite star of the team. Joel had 
donned a suit, in spite of injury, and 
had come into the game with the 
determination to do all in his power 
to save his Alma Mater from defeat. 
On the entrance of chief into the 
game, the team took on new life and 
seemed, to move as a new eleven 
With but seven minutes to play, a 
determination to win went into every 
man and in three minutes a touch- 
down was scored. "Wheelock back" 
the quarter-back would call and 
chief would take he ball for a gain 
of from five to twenty yards every 
rush. It was this running and the 
team's brace that put the ball in 
position for the first score of six 
points. 

With but four minutes left, a cry 
of touchdown was again heard. We 
kicked to the Indians and after one 
first down took the ball from them. 
The ball was kicked on a fourth 
down by Snavely after several un- 
successful line plunges and the team 
went down the field fast. The Indian 
who received the kick fumbled on be- 
ine: tackled and DeHuff fell on free 
baM. From this place Wheelock car- 
ried the ball and with thirty seconds 
of play scored the winning touch- 
down. The game came to a climati- 
cal close and victory after such a 



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Students' Discount Packard & Radcliffe Shoes 

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For Cakes and Confectionery 

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H. B. FLOWERS 

Manufacturer of 

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Chips 

LEBANON, PA. 




Duplicate Photo- 
graphs can be had 
from the negatives 
made at Lebanon 
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Place orders with 
Mr. A. h. Weaver. 

Special Prices giv^ 
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Photographs made at 
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COLLEGE NEWS 



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WINDSOR HOTEL 

W. T. BRUBAKER, Manager. 
European, $1.00 per day and up 
American, $2.50 per day and up 



game, made everyone wild. Chief 
was carried in on the backs of sev- 
eral students and was surrounded by 
an immense crowd of yelling and 
cheering rooters. It was Chief who 
won the game and to him belongs all 
credit. He inspired the team and by 
his very presence enat^ed them to do 
the hitherto impossible. We are sat- 
isfied to say that this game belonged 
to Chief and but for him the last 
football used on L. V. field in 1913 
season would now rest in Carlisle. 

Below the line-up and particulars: 
\j v. CarlisTe 

Lerew L E Skindor 

Mackert L T Morei 

Mickey L G Matolai 

Von Berghy .... C ... Weinershick 

Hollinger R G White 

Statton R T Dewey 

E. Snavely RE Jacobs 

Donahue L H B Brachard 

Evans RHB .... Squirrel 

C. Snavely Q B Needham 

Pell F B Lee 

Substitutions, L. V., Wheelock for 
Evans; Strickler for Donahue; De- 
Huff for Mickey; Wenrick for Holl- 
inger. Touchdowns, Wheelock 2; 
Squirrel 1. Goals from field — Leo 1. 
Goal from touchodwn. — Wheelock 1; 
Dee 1. Peferee Barnhard, U. of M. 
Umpire, Gingrich, U. of Kan. Head 
linesman, Dehman, D. V. Time of 
ouarters, 12 minutes. 



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on Filbert Street 

The only moderate priced hotel of 
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PHILADELPHIA 



GINGRICH-H ARNISH . 

Last Tuesday morning a collegs 
romance culminated when Miss 
Edith A. Gingrich, '11, of the con- 
servatory, and Mr. Claire P. Har- 
nish, '12, were married. The wed- 
ding took place at the home of the 
bride in Annville, Prof. A. E. Shroy- 
er, B. D., officiating. 

After a wedding dinner Mr. and 
Mrs. Harnish left for a trip through 
the states. They will be at home 
January first, at East Main street, 
Mechanicsburg, Pa., where Mr. Har- 
nish is in business. Many of their 
friends in town sent best wishes with 
them when they left on Tuesday. 



MATHEMATICAL ROUND TABLE. 

The Mathematical Round Table 
met in a regular meeting on Wed- 
nesday night. A very interesting 
program was rendered. Mr. Paul 
Bowman explained the "Fourth Di- 
mension" in a very clear and inter- 
esting way. Mr. Reuben Williams 
read an interesting paper on the 
"Life of Newton," and Mr. Rodes 
conducted the "Open Parliament" in 
a unique way. The meeting was 
well attended and seven new mem- 
bers were secured. 



Academy Tailor 

DAVID B. B ASHORE 



Clothing Called for 
and Keturned 



Academy Bid g 
Room 18 



D. B. SHIFf ER 
GRADUATE OPTICIAN 

Eyes Examined, Glasses Fitted, Broken 
Lenses Replaced, anything in 
the Optical line 



Miss May Horner, '10, sailed for 
Freetown, West Africa, last Tues- 
day. Miss Horner is going as a mis- 
sionary and will teach in the Girls' 
school at Moyamba. 



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LEBANON VALLEY CoCLEGE 



Volume V. Annville, Pa., Tuesday, Decembep 2, 1913 



flo. 12 



Entered as second-class matter November 12, 1910, at the post office at Annrille, Pa., under the act of March 3, 1879. 




E 




ADDRESSES CHAPEL INTER-CLASS GAM 



Last Monday the student of L. V. 
C. were especially favored by hav- 
ing with them Dr. Granville, Presi- 
dent of Pennsylvania College at Get- 
tysburg. Dr. Granville had been vis- 
iting the First Lutheran Church of 
Annville on last Sunday and preach- 
ed the sermon there in the evening. 
This was a splendid opportunity to 
have him speak to us so he came and 
spoke on "Luck." He gave a very 
interesting talk basing his remarks 
on the story of the Good Samaritan, 
saying that taking advantage of an 
opportunity will bring about good 
luck. Neglecting to take advantage 
of any chance to do something for 
yourself or some one else will bring 
about bad results that may be called 
bad luck. Thus luck, chance, oppor- 
tunity come to mean about the same 
thing. The students appreciated his 
talk and Professor Lehman could not 
help but remind them that Dr. Gran- 
ville had written the present text 
book which we are using in calculus, 
thus bringing him nearer to us as 
students. We enjoyed his visit very 
much and invite him to come again. 




Alumni 



Thanksgiving evening at the home 
°f her parents in Dayton, Ohio, Miss 
Jessie Brane, '09, conservatory, and 
R ev. S. Edwin Rupp, '01, of Harris- 
burg, Pa., were united in marriage 
*>y the bride's father, Rev. Dr. C. I. 
B - Brane. 

Mr. and Mrs. Riipp are well known 
here, and their many friends will 
Wl sh them success and happiness. 
They will be at home January first 
at 343 Reily St., Harrisburg, Pa. 

A number of Lebanon Valley grad- 
uates are rendering important ser- 
ice to the industrial world as Y. M. 
u A. secretaries in the South: 

Mr. W. C. Arnold, '03, is handling 
lm Portant project at Laurel, Miss., 
Continued on page 3 



Tuesday afternoon of last week 
was the day designated for the an- 
nual Soph-Fresh foot-ball game. The 
rivalry between the two classes was 
intense, although odds were 10-7 on 
the "kids." The contest was bit- 
terly fought from whistle to whistle, 
as only a class contest can be, the 
game being in doubt up to the very 
last minute. 

It was only by means of a well- 
blocked punt that the "upper class" 
was able to gain the decision and 
for this the Sophs must receive 
credit. 

The varsity underclassmen were 
very nearly evenly distributed be- 
tween the two classes and were the 
chief contenders for each side. The 
game developed several "dark- 
horses," among whom may be men- 
tioned Ziegler for the "Cubs" and 
"Sam" Mickey for the second-year 
men, but Donahue, Swartz, Pell, Hol- 
linger, and Evans had to be reck- 
oned with throughout the game. Von 
Bereghy, of the Sophs, clearly out- 
punted Swartz and was in no small 
measure responsible for keeping 
Wheelock's "kids" on the defensive. 
Several neat forward passes were 
executed by both sides and showed 
that both the teams were well train- 
ed. W. Swartz and M. Long showed 
good form for new men and made 
end runs practically an impossibility 
around their ends. 

Both teams showed that they had 
been carefully coached and Wheelock 
of the Freshmen and Mackert of the 
Sophomores deserve much credit. 
There was much wrangling through- 
out the game owing to the fact that 
the members of each team had the 
mistaken idea that the officials were 
not well enough acquainted with the 
rules. 

Following is the line-up of the 
teams: 

1916. 1917. 

Long, M Li E Rupp 

Hollinger L. T Loomis 

Ernst L. G Fink 

Crabill C Wenrich 

Continued on page 2 




E 3bnni 

E TENNIS 




On Monday before the Thanksgiv- 
ing recess, the finals in the men's 
tennis tournament were played. Carl 
Schmidt, '14, by defeating Harry 
Charlton, '14, in a series of three 
sets became tennis champion of Leb- 
anon Valley. The tournament 
throughout was very interesting, and 
a great deal of enthusiasm was: 
shown. Interest in tennis has taken 
on new life. Practically everybody 
who takes any interest in the game 
entered the tournament, and al- 
though it took several weeks to play 
off the preliminaries, the interest did 
not wane. Many interesting and. 
hard fought matches were played, 
and the ability shown by the players 
demonstrates that there should be 
plenty of good material for the ten- 
nis team next spring. We hope that 
Lebanon Valley will be represent- 
ed by a good strong team, and she 
surely will be, if the interest and 
ability shown during the tournament 
which has just closed can be taken 
as an indication. 

Now although the season has clos- 
ed, let us not forget, but look for- 
ward to the coming season with its. 
tournament and contests. 




Items of Interest 



Miss Josephine Urich spent Thurs- 
day and Friday with Miss Miriam 
Carl at Harrisburg. 

Harry H. Charlton was the guest 
of Miss Wilson at Harrisburg on 
Thanksgiving. 

Miss Aubrey Poling, of Nyack, N. 
Y., visited the school last Saturday. 

Miss Helen Brightbill, ex-'15, a 
student at Vassar, spent Thanksgiv- 
ing with her parents in Annville. 

Yale locks have been put on all 
the doors in the Boys' Dormitory. 

Mr. Arthur Evans and Mr. Earl 
Continued on page 4 



COLLEGE NEWS 



College fleaus 



Issued weekly during the College 
Year by the Students of Lebanon 
Valley College 



EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 
R. M. WEIDLER '14 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 
florence mentz '15 
John b. lyter '14 

Social 

ESTA WAREHEIM '16 

Athletics 
PHILO STATTON '15 

Alumni 
PAUL STRICKLER '14 

Music 

RAY P. CAMPBELL '16 

BUSINESS MANAGER 

HARRY CHARLTON '14 



Subscription Price $1.00 per year 
Single Copies 5 cts. 
Clubs of ten, 75 cts. 



Address all business communications 

to HARRY CHARLTON '14 all Other 

matter to Room 22, Administra- 
tion Building Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege, Annville, Pa. 



EDITORIAL. 

This is the big year at Lebanon 
Valley. Improvements, students, 
foot-ball, and good spirit have all 
had a part in making this the ban- 
ner year. What seemed impossible 
at one time now exists and greater 
things are coming. • 

During Thanksgiving week, our 
first vacation, what did we do or say 
for Lebanon Valley, and with what 
enthusiasm did we approach our col- 
lege topics? Most of us come from 
communities in which Lebanon Val- 
ley is well known, and from towns 
where our college's spirit has been 
felt. What did we answer when ask- 
•ed about our school? Did we see our 
opportunity and responsibility and 
tell of the wonderful things that have 
been accomplished, or did we answer 
any inquiry with a short non-com- 
mittal sentence? Did we take the 
questions as a personal question and 
tell all that we, as individuals, did, 
and leave an impression that with- 
out our efforts many things would 
not be accomplished; or did we tell 
all, and take only such praise as our 
questioner might see fit to give us? 
What have we said about our fellow 
students? Have we criticised them 
unjustly and because of some per- 
sonal feeling made them to stand as 
heroes or appear as vagabonds? In 
short, do you feel that you did what 
was best for the school and church 
during your vaction? 

Questions are often asked by our 
college alumni that seem hard to 



Students and friends of Lebanon Valley College 
are cordially invited to attend 
The Football Reception 
to be held on 
Thursday Evening, December Fourth, 
Nineteen thirteen, 
at eight o'clock 
in the new gymnasium. 



answer, but we can always give an 
optimistic answer if we feel so in- 
clined. Talk in earnest, let your ex- 
pression show that you love the 
cause, and persist in talking when 
people are tired of hearing about 
school. If we have such a spirit we 
will put life into the alumni, and 
cause them to remember the old 
days; we will encourage the pros- 
pective students, and cause them to 
long for college life; and we will 
make ourselves better college stu- 
dents. What have we done, helped 
or hindered our college? 



FOOT BALL 



Many Visitors at 

Clio Anniversary 



Many visitors were present at the 
Clionian Anniversary. Most of them 
stayed for the football game on Sat- 
urday. Those who visited L. V. were 
Rev. Joseph Daugherty, Columbia; 
Miss Mary Musser, Mountville; Miss 
Mary Nissley, Middletown; Mr. 
Mackey Oyler, Chambersburg; Mr. 
George Frederic Botts, Elizabeth- 
ville; Mrs. Snavely, Miss Bernyce 
Richardson, Ramey, Pa.; Miss Lu- 
cinda Potter, Miss Ray Faust, York; 
Miss Mary Dehuff, Royersford; Miss 
Ruth Quigley, Miss Velma Heindel, 
Red Lion; Mr. Oliver Butterwick, 
Hershey; Miss Pauline Kiracofe and 
Miss Hattie Landis, Hagerstown, 
Md.; Miss Dora Ryland, Cressona; 
Miss Miriam Canles, Mr. Charles 
Dasher,' Mr. Harold Gilman, Hariis- 
burg; Mr. Guyer, Miss Lottie Guyer, 
Shippensburg; Mr. Abraham Dearolf, 
Hershey; the Misses Krause, Mr. 
Arthur Evans, Lykens; Mr. Gerald 
Brubaker, New Holland; Miss Myrl 
Behney, Lebanon; Miss Violet Prout, 
Wiconisco; Mrs. Steinhour and son, 
Earl, Lemoyne; Miss Gertrude Lehr, 
Lykens; Mr. Mackert, Sunbury; Mrs. 
Major, Lebanon; Mr. Victor Arndt, 
Philadelphia. 



Continued from page 1 

Light R. G Bachman 

Von Bereghy..R. T Huber 

Long, J R. E Swartz, W. 

McNelly Q. B Donahue, 

(Captain) 

Mickey L. H Zeigler 

Evans, Capt. . .R. H Snavely 

Pell F. B Swartz, R. 

Touchdowns: Pell. Referee: 
Wanner, U. of P. Umpire: Strick- 
ler, L. V. Head linesman: Snavely, 
L. V. Time of quarters: 12, 10, 12, 
10. Timekeepers: Rodes, '14; Gib- 
ble, '15. 



THE FRESHMAN HIKE. 

As a fitting climax to the football 
game last Tuesday the Freshman 
class took a moon light hike to the 
Water Works. Miss Schmidt acted 
as chaperone and the walk was a 
most delightful one as the night was 
superb and everyone in the best of 
spirits. The party gathered at the 
railroad bridge at 7 p. m. As soon 
as every one had arrived including 
the guest of honor Mr. Wheelock, 
the pleasure-seekers proceeded. By 
the time they reached the Water 
Works their appetites were keenly 
sharpened and the Sophs' marsh- 
mellows tasted exceedingly delight- 
ful. The supper was enjoyed all the 
more when the Freshies thought that 
they were spiting the Sophs and were 
eating marshmellows at some one 
else's expense. After spending some 
time there in fun and frolic the party 
started for home. During the home- 
ward journey "Chief" showed his de- 
velopment along social lines by steal- 
ing some one's girl. The tired but 
happy company returned to the dor- 
mitory and disturbed the troubled 
sleep of the Sophs by their yells of 
"Marshmellows." 



COLLEGE NEWS 



SOPHOMORES CELEBRATE. 

On Tuesday night the Sophomores 
celebrated their foot-ball victory by 
having a party in the parlors of the 
Ladies' Dormitory. The class as- 
sembled at about 7.30. With a few- 
well chosen remarks Mr. Mason Long 
presented Mr. Mackert, who coached 
the team, with a token of the ap- 
preciation of the class. 

After the presentation a number 
of appropriate games were played. 
Among them were a talking contest, 
vocal high jumps, a hundred yard 
dash, and two foot-ball games. A 
team of ladies played the first foot- 
ball game, and a team of men the 
second game. These games were at- 
tended by much interest and excite- 
ment. Mr. Hollinger won the talk- 
ing contest for talking the fastest 
and the longest without smiling. 

After the games two quartettes 
rendered selections. The members of 
the first quartette were Messrs. Von 
Bereghy, Mackert EchelPerger and 
Ernst; of the second, Messrs. Mason 
and John Long, Crabill, and Heintzel- 
man. Miss Johnson then sang two 
solos, which were very well receiv- 
ed. 

After the games everyone went to 
the dining room where they enjoyed 
the food provided, the sight of the 
prettily arranged table, and the good 
fellowship of the feast. Everyone 
enjoyed especially toasting marsh- 
mellows over candles provided for the 
purpose. 

Miss Johnson, Mr. Mackert, Miss 
Risser, Miss Martha Snyder and 
Miss Wyand were the special guests 
of the class. 

After several yells the party broke 
up at ten o'clock. Everyone of the 
thirty-four persons present enjoyed 
every minute of the time. 



ALUMNAE NOTES. 



Patronize the 



RAH! RAH! BOYS EAT 

Raw Oysters at "Ussy's" 

OR EAT EM STEWED OR FRIED JUST AS 
YOU PREFER 

A. 8. MILLER W. MAIN ST. 

Journal Publishing Co. 

Printers 



Main Street 



Annville, Pa. 



Get Your Shoes Repaired at 
GIANDONATO'S SHOP 



EAST MAIN STREET 

Shop Work done while you wait 
Satisfaction guaranteed 



Prices right 



D. L. SAYLOR & SONS 

CONTRACTORS and BUILDERS 

Dealers in 
DUMBER and COAL ->NNVILLE, PA. 



Continued from pa^e i 

under the patronage of large lumber 
interests there; Mr. H. E. Spessard, 
'00, is connected with the work of 
the Parker Cotton Mill interests at 
Greers, S. C, the largest Southern 
company; Mr. F. R. Kennedy, '11, 
is directing a large coal mining as- 
sociation at Benham, Ky., for em- 
ployees of the International Har- 
vester Co.; and Mr. Earle E. Spes- 
sard, '11, is secretary of the Associa- 
tion at Stamps, Ark., supported by 
the Buchanan lumber interests. It 
is hoped that other graduates may 
be interested in a similar way. 

Norman C. Schlichter, '97, is ar- 
ranging for welfare conferences of 
representatives of the Southern lum- 
ber industry under the direction of 
a special welfare Committee of the 
Yellow Pine Manufacturers' Associa- 
tion. The conferences embrace health, 
accident, educational, religious, and 
social topics and are to be held at 
New Orleans, La., and Little Rock, 
Ark., early in December. Mr. Schlich- 
ter represents in this work the In- 
dustrial Dept., of the International 
Committee of Y. M. C. A's. 

Miss Helen L. Weidler, '12, of 
High Bridge, N. J., spent Saturday 
afternoon at the college. 

Mr. Roger B. Saylor, '11, an in- 
structor in Columbia University spent 
his Thanksgiving vacation in Ann- 
ville. 

Prof. Max F. Lehman, '07, of Bal- 
timore, spent Thanksgiving with his 
parents, Dr. and Mrs. Lehman. 

Mr. Roger S. B. Hartz, '08, who 
is doing construction work in Balti- 
more, spent Saturday at school. 

Miss Edith Freed, '10, who is 
teaching at Berwyn, visited her 
mother, Mrs. Violette Freed during 
the Thanksgiving recess. 

Miss Edith M. Lehman, '13, of Roy- 
ersford, visited her parents in Ann- 
ville during the Thanksgiving recess. 

Ivan K. Ressler, '13, of Shamokin, 
spent the week end visiting friends 
in Washington, D. C. 

Six members of the faculty, in- 
cluding the principal, of the Leba- 
non High School, are graduates of 
Lebanon Valley. Little wonder that 
that school ranks among the best. 

The Alumnae Association has al- 
ready obtained nearly enough sub- 
scriptions to cover the cost of the 
new gymnasium. 

Phares Holdeman, '11, of Tremont, 
spent the week-end visiting his 
brother-in-law, V. W. Heffelfinger, 
'14. 

Chas. B. Plummer, '10, of Hagers- 
town, visited friends at the college 
durEing the past week. 

The Otterbein Memorial U. B. 
Church, Baltimore, which has Rev. 
F. B. Plummer, '05, for her pastor, 



Academy Tailor 

DflVlD B. BflSHOf^E 



Clothing Called for 
and Returned 



Academy Bldg 
Room 18 



D. B. SHIFFER 
GRADUATE OPTICIAN 

Eyes Examined, Glasses Fitted, Broken 
Lenses Replaced, anything in 
the Optical line 

East Main St ANNVILLE 



You get only the best at 

COLLAM'S 

Quantity ✓ ✓ ✓ Quality 
Main Street 




football Ambition 

BASKETBALL 

BASEBALL to excel in any 

HOCKEY sport is rendered 

CRICKET easier by being 

EQUIPMENT properly epuipped, 

A, G. Spauliing & Bros, are o utfitters t 
champions, whose implements must be 
nvariably right. Quality Counts. 

Spalding's Catalogue is now 
ready — free for the asking 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS, 

126-128 Nassau St. 520 Fifth Ave. NEW YOR K 

M.F.BatdorfsSon 

Ladies' and Gents' 
Furnishings 



Main Street 



Annvilh 



JOS. MILLER 

FURNITURE 
and UNDERTAKING 



West Main Street 



Annville, Pa. 



MERCHANT 
TAILOR 



JACOB SARGENT 

READY-TO-WEAR CLOTHING 
Main Street Amville 

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 

% SCHOOL of \V 
'«t s % ENGINEERING 

CIVIL. MECHANICAL, ELECTRICAL and CHEMICAL 
ENGINEERING, and GENERAL SCIENCE 

Send for a Catalogue. TROY, IM«T« 



COLLEGE NEWS 



College fiecus 



Issued weekly during the College 
Year by the Students of Lebanon 
Valley College 



EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

R. M. WEIDLER '14 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 
florence mentz '15 
John b. lyter '14 

Social 

EST A WAREHEIM '16 

Athletics 

PHILO STATTON '15 

Alumni 
PAUL STRICKLER '14 

Music 
RAY P. CAMPBELL '16 

BUSINESS MANAGER 

HARRY CHARLTON '14 



Subscription Price $1.00 per year 

Single Copies 5 cts. 
Clubs of ten, 75 cts. 



Address all business communications 

tO HARRY CHARLTON '14 all Other 

matter to Room 22, Administra- 
tion Building Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege, Annville, Pa. 



EDITORIAL 

"Honesty is the best policy," is an 
old but true saying. If there is one- 
quality in a person which is admired 
and respected above all others, it is 
honesty. Who is it among criminals 
that is the most despised? Surely 
there is only one answer; the sneak 
thief. Who is most respected in the 
business world? Again there is only 
one answer: The man whose deal- 
ings with his fellows are strictly 
honest ,and above criticism. A hypo- 
crite who says one thing to one per- 
son, and the direct opposite to an- 
other is despised by all who know 
him. Such a one is like a snake for 
which we must be on our guard con- 
tinually, lest he strike from behind. 

All of us want to be successful in 
life. One of the best means to attain 
this end is to be honest in all of our 
dealings with our fellows. If a man 
is known to be perfectly honest in 
all things, even though he is de- 
ficient in many others, his path 
through life will be much easier 
than that of his disboustv brother. 

Let us aim to be honest in our 
dealings with all, so that no one 
can say anything detrimental of us, 
and that our own consciences will 
have no cause to worry us. Happi- 
ness is the reward of honesty, but 
the wages of dishonesty is disgrace 
and trouble. 



Students and friends of Lebanon Valley College 
are cordially invited to attend 
The Football Reception 
to be held on 
Friday Evening, December Twelfth, 
Nineteen hundred and thirteen, 
at eight o'clock 
in the new gymnasium. 








MISS PASTOR WED OF ART EXHIBIT 



Market Square Presbyterian 
church, Harrisburg, was aglow with 
great clusters of American beauty 
roses and snapdragons for the mar- 
raige Thanksgiving afternoon at 3 
o'clock of Miss Mary L. Pastor and 
the Rev. Harry E. Ulrich, '13, a 
minister of the United Brethren 
church, now stationed at Gordon- 
ville. 

The Rev. J.| Ritchie Smith per- 
formed the ceremony. The pretty 
bride wore a traveling frock of 
smock cloth in Maeterlinck blue 
shade, with small black hat with 
white ostrich trimmings. Her corsage 
was of pink sweet peas. She was at- 
tended by Miss Ada Wills and the 
best man was John Lyter. The new- 
lyweds left immediately after the 
ceremony to spend their honeymoon 
in the South, and when they /eturn 
will reside at Gordonville. 



JAPANESE ART EXHIBIT 

Last Thursday Mr. S. Obata, a 
Japanese who is studying at the 
University of Wisconsin, 'set up an 
art exhibit in one of the rooms in 
the administration building. The 
exhibit consisted exclusively of Jap- 
anese work most of the pictures be- 
ing nature scenes. All of the work 
was well done and of the exclusive 
Japanese style, unique, clever and 
artistic. The exhibit was free and 
many of the students feasted their 
eyes on the different pictures. 



The following is the report made 
by L. B. Harnish, of the funds col- 
lected and spent, for the Lebanon 
Valley College pictorial exhibit, 
placed in the Educational depart- 
ment Museum, of the State Library, 
and in securing the Compulsory 
Athletic fee. The cast of the prints 
and mounting of the exhibit, the 
carfare and cost' of placing it, was 
$44.34, and the cost of mail, carfare 
and expenses of Mr. Harnish in se- 
curign the Compukpry Athletic fee 
was, $9.63. 

Artist Blazier, of Lebanon did the 
photographic work on the exhibit, 
and it is a credit to both him and 
Lebanon Valley College. 

The donors were as follows: 
Dr. Lawrence Keister, $10.00; 
Milton A. Blazier, $6.20; Wilbur E. 
$1.00; S. I. West, $1.00; S. 
Krpnenberg's Sons, $1.00; E. 
A. Shulenberger, $1.00; Geo. 
W. Stine, $1.00; J. R. Frank 
Smith, $1.00; S. D. Clark, $1.00; 
John Hunsicker, $1.00; Lebanon 
Evening Report, $1.00; Joe. Kreider, 
Sr., $1.00; C. A. Chandler, $.50; A. 
S. Miller, $.50; A. L. Boltz, $.25; 
Mrs. Clara B. Harnish, $6.50; H. A. 
Sherk, $5.00; Hon. A. S. Kreider, 
$2.00; Andrew Albright, $1.00; J. 
Harvey Heagy, $1.00; H. A. Ewing, 
$1.00; D. R. Thompson, $1.00; H. L. 
Kinports, $1.00; S. C. Stecker, $1.00 
O. P. Butterwick, $1.00; Prof. H. H. 
Baisih, $1.00; Lebanon Daily News, 
$1.00; Tra K. Dutweller, $.77; J. A- 
Tritt, $.50; Jacob Sargent, $.50; 
M. H. Bachman, $.25. 



COIiliEGE fiEWS 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



Volume V. Annville, Pa., Tuesday, December 9, 1913 Jio. 13 

Entered as second-class matter November 12, 1910, at the post office at Annville, Pa., under the act of March 3, 1879. 



BASKET BALL MEN 
WORK FOR TEAM 

During tho first week of basket 
ball practice there, have been a 
number of men who have reported to 
Coach Guyer for a try out for the 
varsity squal. From last years var- 
sity team we have Captain Schmidt 
and Carl Snavely, guards and 
Strickler a forward as a nucleus to 
form this years- team. 

Among the men who have shown 
good form are Hollinger and Von 
Bereghey, fighting for the pivot posi" 
tions on the team. Strickler, 
Schwartz and Wheelock are trying 
out for the forward positions and 
have shown great speed in doing the 
floor Wi'rk. Captain Schmidt, Lcomis, 
Donahue and Snavely are out for the 
guard positions and they have shown 
great form for the first week of 
practice. The men who have not de- 
veloped quite as fast are Moll and 
Eichelberger, forwards and Charlton 
and Rupp guards. The coach will be 
able to. whip a fine varsity team in- 
to shape from this wealth of ma- 
terial. 

This year we wall have the best 
basket ball team in the history of 
the college and one that will be 
hard to beat on our own floor. Man- 
ager Walter has arranged a good 
schedule and it will be announced 
in a few days. 

An interclass league will be form- 
ed to fight it cut for the champion- 
ships of the college and their games 
will be played off after Christmas 
vacation. All men who are interested 
in basket ball should report to 
Coach Guyer this week for a try 
°ut and to give the varsity squad 
good practice. 



CALENDAR 

Tuesday, Dec. 9, 6 p. m. Prayer 
meeting. 

Wednesday, Dec. 10, 11a. m., Fall 
Athletic election. 

Friday, Dec. 12, 7 p. m., Societies 
8 P. m. Football reception. 

Sunday, Dec. 14 1 p. m., Chris- 
ten associations. 



LITERARY JOINT 
SESSION HELD 

On Friday evening December the 
fifth Philo Hall was put in readi- 
ness to entertain her sister sioeiety, 
Clio. Every one came wearing the 
broadest smile for every one expect- 
ed to have a good time and they got 
it. 

The programme was very good. 
After the devotional exercises by the 
chaplain, Mr. Brenneman, the pro- 
gramme proper began. Miss Hertzler 
demonstrated her ability by playing 
a piano solo. A monologue called 
'A Different View,' by Josephine Urich 
was exceptionally delightful and 
pleasing. Then came the heated ar- 
gument between a Pennsylvania 
Dutchman and a sawed-off hammer- 
ed down Irish man. "Has the Penn- 
sylvania German added materially 
to the development of the com- 
munity." The Messrs. P. A. Statton 
and G. A. Dehuff played a violin 
and flute duet. Very classical and 
entertaining. The sketch written by 
Mr. Howard Olewiler in blank verse 
called "Love's Labor's lost and re- 
gained' as a complete farce in three 
acts was a howling success. A great- 
er than Shakespeare has appeared; 
he even introduced the Prologue in 
the person of Jacob Shenberger. The 
double quartet sang "A Spring 
Song." The music was very beautiful 
and was exceptionally well rendered. 
Then followed the "Olive Branch" 
and "Living Thoughts," original and 
entertaining. 

After the programme everyone 
was made welcome by the Philo 1 ? 
and we spent a most enjoyable so- 
cial period. A special attraction was 
Mr. "Jack" Machen, who showed de- 
velopment* along the lines of juggler- 
ism and contortionism and did some 
remarkable stunts, almost beyond 
belief. Then another surprise was 
the Philo .orchestra. Last but not 
least came the "eats" in two courses. 
The guests were allowed to stay un- 
til 10.30. Every one had a very 
good time. 



TIM Ml CI 
INTJESSIOli 

As this was the first Sunday ot 
the month the Y. W. and Y. M. C. A. 
met in joint session. Mr. Lester Zug 
was the leader and his subject was.; 
"Thanksgiving." Although Thanks- 
giving Day is over giving thanks is 
in order all the time. His scripture 
lesson was taken from the healing of 
the ten lepers by Jesus. Nine went 
on their way rejoicing, only one 
came back to thank Him. So with 
too many of us today we go on our 
way thoughtlessly forgetting to give 
him the praise and the glory due for 
what he has done for us. The meet- 
ing was then open for all and many 
took advantage of the opportunity. 
Although the weather was not of the 
brightest there was a goodly attend- 
ance of students. We are glad to 
see the interest manifested in these 
meetings and hope it will continue. 



FRESHMEN AT BANQUET 

After several attempts the Fresh- 
men at last went away for their 
banquet. They waited until the end 
of the week, when the five day stu- 
dents might go from their homes 
and the rest of the class might go 
on Sunday. All during the day the 
Freshmen left on the different trains 
and cars out of Annville. One of the 
Freshmen who was less prudent 
than the rest was captured by the 
Sophomores. He fought desperately 
but to no avail, for the Sophomore 
boys, after very graciously allowing 
him to turn over the money for the. 
banquet which he had in his pos-. 
session to a Freshman girl so that 
the banquet might net be entirely 
broken up, hustled him off to parts- 
unknown. 



MISS SELTZER 

TENNIS CHAMPION 

A very interesting tennis match' 
which decided the ladies' cham- 
p ion ship of the school was played' 
last week. Miss Seltzer by defeating 
Miss Loser became the ladies' tennis; 
champion. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



College fieuus 



Issued weekly during the College 
Year by the Students of Lebanon 
Valley College 



EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

R. M. WEIDLER '14 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 
florence mentz '15 
John b. lyter '14 

Social 
ESTA WAREHEIM '16 

Athletics 
PHILO STATTON '15 

Alumni 
PAUL STRICKLER '14 

Music 

RAY P. CAMPBELL '16 

BUSINESS MANAGER 

HARRY CHARLTON '14 



Subscription Price $1.00 per year 

Single Copies 5 cts. 
Clubs of ten, 73 cts. 



Address all business communications 
to HARRY CHARLTON '14 all Other 

matter to Room 22, Administra- 
tion Building Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege, Annville, Pa. 



EDITORIAL 

"Honesty is the best policy," is an 
old but true saying. If there is one- 
quality in a person which is admired 
and respected above all others, it is 
honesty. Who is it among criminals 
that is the most despised? Surely 
there is only one answer; the sneak 
thief. Who is mpst respected in the 
business world? Again there is only 
one answer: The man whose deal- 
ings with his fellows are strictly 
honest ,and above criticism. A hypo- 
crite who says one thing to one per- 
son, and the direct opposite to an- 
other is despised by all who know 
him. Such a one is like a snake for 
which we must be on our guard con- 
tinually, lest he strike from behind. 

All of us want to be successful in 
life. One of the best means to attain 
this end is to be honest in all of our 
dealings with our fellows. If a man 
is known to be perfectly honest in 
all things, even though he is de- 
ficient in many others, his path 
through life will be much easier 
than that of his dishousK-, brother. 

Let us aim to be honest in our 
dealings with all, so that no one 
can say anything detrimental of us, 
and that our own consciences will 
have no cause to worry us. Happi- 
ness is the reward of honesty, but 
the wages of dishonesty is disgrace 
and trouble. 



Students and friends of Lebanon Valley College 
are cordially invited to attend 
The Football Reception 
to be held on 
Friday Evening, December Twelfth, 
Nineteen hundred and thirteen, 
at eight o'clock 
in the new gymnasium. 







s 





Market Square Presbyterian 
church, Harrisburg, was aglow with 
great clusters of American beauty 
roses and snapdragons for the mar- 
raige Thanksgiving afternoon at 3 
o'clock of Miss Mary L. Pastor and 
the Rev. Harry E. Ulrich, '13, a 
minister of the United Brethren 
church, now stationed at Gordon- 
ville. 

The Rev. J.| Ritchie Smith per- 
formed the ceremony. The pretty 
bride wore a traveling frock of 
smock cloth in Maeterlinck blue 
shade, with small black hat with 
white ostrich trimmings. Her corsage 
was of pink sweet peas. She was at- 
tended by Miss Ada Wills and the 
best man was John Lyter. The new- 
lyweds left immediately after the 
ceremony to spend their honeymoon 
in the South, and when they return 
will reside at Gordonville. 



JAPANESE ART EXHIBIT 

Last Thursday Mr. S. Obata, a 
Japanese who is studying at the 
University of Wisconsin, "set up an 
art exhibit in one of the rooms in 
the administration building. The 
exhibit consisted exclusively of Jap- 
anese work most of the pictures be- 
ing nature scenes. All of the work 
was well done and of the exclusive 
Japanese style, unique, clever and 
artistic. The exhibit was free and 
many of the students feasted their 
eyes on the different pictures. 



FINANCIAL REPORT 
OF ART EXHIBIT 



The following is the report made 
by L. B. Harnish, of the funds col- 
lected and spent, for the Lebanon 
Valley College pictorial exhibit, 
placed in the Educational depart- 
ment Museum, of the State Library, 
and in securing the Compulsory 
Athletic fee. The cast of the prints 
and mounting of the exhibit, the 
carfare and cosf'of placing :t, was 
$44.34, and the cost of mail, carfare 
and expenses of Mr. Harnish in se- 
curign the Compukpry Athletic fee 
was, $9.63. 

Artist Blazier, of Lebanon did the 
photographic work on the exhibit, 
and it is a credit to both him and 
Lebanon Valley College. 

The donors were as follows: 
Dr. Lawrence Keister, $10.00; 
Milton A. Blazier, $6.20; Wilbur E. 
$1.00; S. I. West, $1.00; S. 
Krpnenberg's Sons, $1.00; E. 
A. Shulenberger, $1.00; Geo. 
W. Stine, $1.00; J. R. Frank 
Smith, $1.00; S. D. Clark, $1.00; 
John Hunsicker, $1.00; Lebanon 
Evening Report, $1.00; Joe. Kreider, 
Sr., $1.00; C. A. Chandler, $.50; A. 
S. Miller, $.50; A. L. Boltz, $.25; 
Mrs. Clara B. Harnish, $6.50; H. A. 
Sherk, $5.00; Hon. A. S. Kreider, 
$2.00; Andrew Albright, $1.00; J. 
Harvey Heagy, $1.00; H. A. Ewing, 
$1.00; D. R. Thompson, $1.00; H. L. 
Kinports, $1.00; S. C. Sleeker, $1.00 
O. P. Butterwick, $1.00; Prof. H. H. 
Baish, $1.00; Lebanon Daily News, 
$1.00; Ira K. Dutweiler, $.77; J. A- 
Tritt, $.50; Jacob Sargent, $.50; 
M. H. Bachman, $.25. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



FRESHMEN FIGHT 
THE SOPHOMORES 



It is very fortunate for the stu- 
dents of Lebanon Valley that the 
new gymnasium is nearly ready for 
use. That the girls especially need a 
place to use their surplus energy 
was evident on Wednesday of the 
past week when the Freshman and 
Sophomore girls met in mortal com- 
bat, and gave vent to their pent up 
energies by boxing one another's 
jaws, and using each other's faces 
for punching bags. 

The trouble began early in the 

RAH! RAH! BOYS EAT 

Raw Oysters at "Ussy's" 

OR EAT 'EM STEWED OR FRIED JUST AS 
YOU PREFER 



A. S. MILLER 



W. MAIN ST. 



Journal Publishing Co. 

Printers 



Main Street 



Annville, Pa. 



Get Your Shoes Repaired at 
CI AN DO NATO'S SHOP 

EAST MAIN STREET 

Shop Work done while you wait. 
Satisfaction guaranteed Prices right 

D. L. SAYLOR & SONS 

CONTRACTORS and BUILDERS 

Dealers in 
LUMBER and COAL - ANNVILLE, PA. 



morning. The "Sophs" had long been 
expecting the "Freshies" to go away 
for their banquet. Suspecting that 
the "Greenies" intended to go this 
week some of the Sophomore girls 
secured, a Freshman's suit case, and 
carried it to the other end of the 
hall. The freshman was angry when 
she could not find her suit case, and 
avenged herself by disarranging the 
room of the "Soph" whom she ac- 
cused. 

Then the Sophomores wanted the 
room put in order again by the 
Freshmen, and so the final combat 
broke out in the afternicon. Af- 
ter a short skirmish, in which both 
sides f|Cught desperately, the fight 
was over and the interested parties, 
after repairing themselves and the 
battle ground, reforged the link of 
friendship. 



KALOZETEAN 

Late News flashes, Ray Light; 
Christmas, Edgar M. Landis; Bas- 
ket ball Outlook for coming season, 
Carl Schmidt, song, Society; par- 
liamentary drill, leaders, John Lyter 
and Henry Snavely; quartette, Paul 
Strickler, Thos. Lyter, Harry Bender, 
M. Von Bereghy. 

PHILOKOSMIAN. 

Resume Chas. Horstick 

Oration Jacob Shenberger 

The Non-Partisan Ballot 

E. H. Smith 

Debate: — Resolved, That the use 
of Handy Liberal Translations should 
be prohibited in the study of Classics, 
in College. 

Affirmative. — Paul Witmeyer, L. A 
Rodes. 

Negative. — David Evans, D. L. 
Reddick. 

Quartette, E. H. Smith, H. L. 
Oleiviler, D. L. Reddick, J, H. Ness. 
The Carlisle Indian School 

Joel Wheelock 
Living Thoughts Editor 



Just a minute please, to call your 

ATTENTION! 

To the finest line of 

JEWELRY, FELT AND LEATHER GOODS 

ever seen at Lebanon Valley. 
Anything at all in College Seal Jewelry. Odd things in 
Felt Pennants and Cushion Tops. "Some Class" in Sheepskin 
Cushions and Wall Banners. 

JUST THE THING FOR CHRISTMAS 
•Nuff Said Better Call Early 
Xmas. Cards, Booklets and Calendars for Particular People 

HAR.NISH <2b SMITH 

THE COLLEGE BOOK STORE 



Patronize the 

Academy Tailor 

DAVID B. basho^e 



Clothing Called for 
and Returned 



Academy Bldg 
Room 18 



D. B. 5HIFFER 
GRADUATE OPTICIAN 

Eyes Examined, Glasses Fitted, Broken 
Lenses Replaced, anything in 
the Optical line 

East Main St ANNVILLE 



You get only the best at 

COLLAM'S 



Quantity ✓ ✓ * Quality 
Main Street 




football Ambition 

BASKETBALL 

BASEBALL to excel in any 

HOCKEY sport is rendered 

CRICKET easier by being 

EQUIPMENT properly epuipped, 

A. 0. Spaulding & Bros, are outfitters to 
champions, whose implements must be 
nvariably right. Quality Counts. 

Spalding's Catalogue is now 
ready — free for the asking 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 

126^128 Nassau St. 520 Fifth Ave. NEW YOR K 

M.F.BatdorfsSon 

Ladies' and Gents' 
Furnishings 

Main Street Annvill? 

JOS. MILLER 

FURNITURE 
and UNDERTAKING 



West Main Street 



Annville, Pa 



JACOB SARGENT 



MERCHANT 
TAILOR 

READY-TO-WEAR CLOTHING 

Main S treet Annville 

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 

% SCHOOL of VV 
ENGINEERING 

CIVIL MECHANICAL, ELECTRICAL and CHEMICAL 

ENGINEERING, and <£ N ERALSCIENC E 
Send for a Catalogue. TROY, IM-T. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



GO TO IT BOYS 



ITS 



Russ Brothers 
Velvet Ice Cream 



AT 



"USSY'S" 

A. S. MILLER, W. Main St. 

jCebanon 1/alley 
College 

First Class Faculty. 
Group System. 

Special Facilities in Chemistry 

a?id Biology 
Music, Art, Oratory 

Ladies in the Hall are under the con- 
stant care of the Preceptress. 

Write for catalogue 
ZRev. S. *D. Sossard, ^President 



WINDSOR HOTEL 

W. T. BRUBAKER, Manager. 
European, $1.00 per day and up 
American, $2.50 per day and up 




Midway between Broad Street 
Station and Reading Terminal 
on Filbert Street 

The only moderate priced hotel of 
reputation and consequence in 

PHILADELPHIA 



RESULTS OF Tit 





L. 
lisle. 



V. vs. Carlisle Indians, at Car- 
Lost 26-0. 
L. V. vs. Pen Brook A. C. at Ann- 
ville. Won 26-7. 

L*. V. vs. Bucknell at Lewisburg. 
Lost 46-0. 

L. V. vs. Pierce Business College 
at Annville. Won 68-0. 

L. V. vs. Hillman Academy at Ann- 
ville. Won 42-0. 

L. V. vs. Washington at Chester- 
town, Md. Won 14-0. 

L. V. vs. Muhlenberg at Allentown. 
Lost 35-0. 

L. V. vs. Dickinson at Carlisle. 
Lost 38-12. 

L. V. vs. Franklin and Marshall at 
Lancaster. Lost 14-0. 

L. V. vs. Indian Seconds at Ann- 
ville. Won 13-10. 

Points scored by L. V 175 

Points scored by Opponents .... 176 

Games Won j> 

Games Lost 



You are correct if you get your 

LADIES 1 and GENTS' 
FURNISHINGS 

At KINPORTS', Annville, Pa. 

Students' Discount Packard & Radcliffe Shoes 

W. D. ELLIOTT 
Shoemaker* 

Repairing neately done. Rubber work a* 
specialty. 

Patronage Solicited 
Railroad St, Annville, Pa. 

LIVERY 

First Class Teams to 
Hire 
Parties a Specialty 
H. F\ LONG & SON 

Rear Eagle Hotel Annville, F»a 

WM. WALTZ 
Hair Cutting and Shaving. 
Saloon 



W. Main St. 



Annville , Pa. 




For Cakes and Confectionery 

GO TO 



Items of Interest 1 Bowman ' s Bakery 



Mrs. Harry Imboden and daugh- 
ter, of Hershey, visited Mrs. Violette 
Freed last week. 

The Mens' Glee Club had their 
pictures taken on Thursday at 
Blazier's Studio. 

New places in the dining hall 
were assigned to the students last 
Tuesday. 

A row of new chairs were put in 
the lecture room of the Biological 
department. 



Alumni 



! 



A son was born to Prof, and 
Mrs. A. E. Shroyer, of the class of 
'00. The "News" extends congratula- 
tions. 

Alfred K. Mills, '04, of Annville 
has received and accepted the ap- 
pointment as deputy prothonotary 
of Lebanon county. He will take 
charge of the office, January 1, 1914. 



WANTED. 

The college is very desirous of se- 
curing a complete file of old cata- 
logues. Catalogues of the years '90- 
'91 and '95-'96 will complete the files. 
If you have either of these catalogues 
please mail or forward same to 
Registrar. 



A FULL SUPPLY OF HALL'S CHOCO*- 
LATES. ALWAYS FRESH 

W. Main St. Annville, Pa. 



Home-Made Noodles, Peanut Butter 

H. B. FLOWERS 

Manufacturer of 

''Flower Brand" Potato 
Chips 

LEBANON, PA. 

Photographs 

Duplicate Photo- 
graphs can be had 
from the negative© 
made at Lebanon 
Valley College. 

Place orders with 
Mr. A. L. Weaver. 

Special Prices giv- 
en students having 
Photographs made at 
our Studio. 

DIVES, P0MER0Y 
& STEWART 

READING, PA, 



COIiliEGE flEWS 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



Volume V. Rnnville, Pa., Tuesday, December 16, 1913 Ho. 1^ 

Entered as second-class matter November 12, 1910, at the post office at Annville, Pa., under the act of March 3, 1879. 



RECEPTION FOR 
F00T1L TEAM 

Last Friday evening an event hap- 
pened which will take its place in 
the historical occurrences around 
Lebanon Valley. This was the form- 
al opening of the new gymnasium in 
a reception for the football letter 
men. The gymnasium, a thing 
which has been dreamed of and plan- 
ned by every enthusiastic supporter 
of L. V. for the last two decades, at 
last became a reality. The alumni of 
the institution are to thank for this 
splendid improvement in athletic 
privileges. The effects of these stu- 
dents of former years made possible 
a basketball five, a track team, a 
gym team and course of study for all 
regular matriculated persons. 

The football reception, which was 
the opening affair in the gymnasium 
was held in reminiscence of the past 
season of football and to award let- 
ters and sweaters to the players, who 
by their faithful work made the sea- 
son a success. 

A unique program was rendered 
in which the Varsity, Scrubs and a 
few of the teams' sympathizers took 
part. 

The evening was arranged accord- 
ing to the rules of football being di- 
vided into two halves of two periods 
each. To take up the "game" in de- 
tail is our purpose and thus it pro- 
ceeded: First Quarter — 

The Varsity quartette, consisting 
of Messrs. Strickler, Snavely, Mack- 
ert, and Von Berghy started the 
period with the "kick off." To say 
that it was a kick off is too little, bet- 
ter call it a "cast off." Everyone 
agreed that this number was as "rot- 
ten" as it was intended to be. 

Next came the announcement of 
the "first down" by Prof. A. B. 
Schroyer. This consisted of an in- 
troductory speech as to the purpose 
of the evening. The umpire here 
called a penalty and while the dis- 
tance was being stepped off "Jack" 
Machen, our acrobatic fellow com- 
rade, entertained the crowd with a 
few clever and- distinctly original 
"stunts." With the signal, 42, 35, 
64, a forward pass, guised in the 
robe of a flute solo by "Cotton" De- 
Huff, was executed for Lebanon Val- 
ley. This "pass," though short, was 
sweet enough to put extra spirit into 
every one. Timekeeper here blew 
his whistle and the teams changed 
goals. 

Second Quarter — 

This period was started with a 
fumble, which although recovered by 
p rof. Derickson, netted a good gain 
for our opponents. As a consequence, 
w e were obliged to punt, and here 
Continued on page 2 



FRESHMEN BANQUET 
AT LANCASTER 



The Freshman class followed the 
example of the other classes and 
stole away to Lancaster to hold its 
banquet. It has been the custom for 
years for the Freshmen to have a 
banquet and the class of 1917 was 
not slow to follow the precedent. 

Having decided to go to Lancaster 
and have their banquet there on 
Monday, December the eighth, the 
only thing that remained was to get 
away safely. All safely eluded the 
Sophs except one, E. Russel Snavely. 
Unfortunately he was caught but a 
mistaken idea prevailed that with 
Mr. Snavely they also captured the 
banquet money. This was a big joke 
for the money belonged to Katherine 
Boltz and not to the class. 

The pleasure seekers arrived at 
Lancaster with Miss Johnson chaper- 
oning, at about 9 o'clock in the 
morning. After dinner they decided 
to visit Millersville State Normal 
School. Passing through the dormi- 
tories and buildings of another 
school they profited by comparing 
them with our own. Coming back 
from Millersville they went to the 
theatre. Soon the time approached 
for the great affair. 

At 8 o'clock the banquet was serv- 
ed in the banquet hall of the Hotel 
Wheatland. A most delicious repast 
followed which filled everybody's 
heart and stomach with content. The 
menu was as follows: 

Blue Points on Half Shell 
Olives Pickles Celery 

Consomme Printiner 
Boiled Salmon a la Regence 
Pomme Aucheso 
Roast Lancaster County Turkey 
Stuffed 
Cranberry Sauce 
Mashed Potatoes French Peas 

Asparagus Tips 
Lettuce Mayonaise 
Roqueford Cheese Bent Crackers 
Neopolitan Ice Cream 
Assorted Cakes Coffee 

When every one had eaten his 
fill the toastmaster, Mr. Reuben 
Williams, arose and made a few re- 
marks. Several members responded 
with toasts. Mr. Zeigler had a toast 
on "The Class of 1917;" Mr. Russel 
Rupp spoke on "Our Girls;" Miss 
Katherine Boltz on "What the Col- 
lege Owes the Class;" Rev. Lynch on 
"Unity in the Class;" Miss Mary 
Garver on "Our Boys;" and last, Rev. 
Bashore on "What the Class Owes 
the College." 

After the banquet was over an 
uncle of Miss Dasher, Mr. Snyder, 
invited the class to be his guests at 
"The Grande Theatre." They all 
went and enjoyed themselves. Thus 
closing the day with a suitable cli- 
max. 



FIRST BASKET BALL 
GIF IN NEW GYM. 

Interest in basketball is being 
brought to high point, with the ap- 
proach of the first game upon the 
new gym floor. Lebanon Y. M. C. A. 
will bring their best team to Ann- 
ville on this Wednesday night, to 
open Lebanon Valley's season. Great 
concern is shown by everyone in re- 
spect to the picking o? the varsity 
five. Coa^h Guyer's task is mot an 
easy one as there is an abundance of 
excellent material reporting regular- 
ly for practice. There are ten men 
who are considered of varsity calibre 
and who are so evenly matched as to 
their playing ability that their berth 
on the team for this first game will 
mean simply a toss-up. Every after- 
noon the game is interesting and 
many times the scrubs show the 
varsity that they are their equals. 
Indeed often the scrubs, who are the 
lighter, prove faster men on the floor 
and are slightly superior in passing- 
the ball. There is room for much 
doubt as to the regular mid-season 
varsity line-up, and a good team is 
surely in the making. 

The opening of the gym is an event 
which is memorable. The event that 
has been thought of and dreamed of 
by every loyal supporter of L. V. has 
happened. The gym floor is now in 
constant use aiding materially by its 
presence, in developing a winning 
basketball team. From three o'clock 
in the afternoon till ten o'clock in 
the evening one can see basketball 
being played its hardest. 

The "co-eds" have been realizing 
possibilities during the past week 
and are developing talent for a good 
Ave. The number of girls reporting" 
is encouraging; there having been as 
many as twenty-three in the gymna- 
sium learning the fundamentals of 
the game. 

A schedule is being arranged for 
the Inter-class League and soon class 
teams will be seen on the floor prac- 
tising that their numerals may head 
the championship banner. Thus 
home games in basketball will never 
be lacking and student spirit should! 
always be at its height the entire sea- 
son. 

The line-up which will represent 
L. V. in its first game will, accord- 
ing to present prospects, be: 

Forwards — Strickler, Wheelock, or 
Swartz. 

Guards — Schmidt, Loomis, or 
Donahue. 

Center — Hollinger. 

The season proper will begin on 
January 6, at Swarthmore. There 
are high hopes entertained for a bril- 
liant season in basketball at Lebanon. 

Continued on page 2 



COLLEGE NEWS 



College fietus 



Issued weekly during the College 
Year by the Students of Lebanon 
Valley College 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

R. M. WEIDLER '14 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 
florence mentz '15 
John b. lyter '14 
Social 

ESTA WAREHEIM '16 

Athletics 

PHILO STATION '15 

Alumni 
PAUL STRICKLER '14 

Music 

RAY P. CAMPBELL '16 

BUSINESS MANAGER 

HARRY CHARLTON '14 

Subscription Price $1.00 per year 
Single Copies j cts. 
Clubs of ten, 75 cts. 

. Address all business communications 

Top HARRY CHARLTON '14 all Other 

•matter to Room 22, Administra- 
tion Building Lebanon Valley Col- 
llege, Annville, Pa. 




v|. GUtristmaa £f 




a wreath of holly cheer to the 
school, each leaf a word and each 
word a praise, and then the hoary 
head of our school will be decorated 
with the choicest possible jewels — 
her sons' and daughters' love. 



CHRISTMAS CHEER 

The emotional side of our natures 
is manifesting itself very strongly 
just at the present time. Eagerness 
and anxiousness are replacing that 
matter of fact nature of ours, and 
every one is happy now. Christmas 
is almost here! 

This is the one time in the year 
that every person wants to be happy, 
and is willing to help make his 
neighbor happy. It may be because 
■of tradition or practice that people 
are happy, or they may all have been 
influenced by the spirits of their as- 
sociate, but it matters little how it 
is gotten, just so the whole lump 
has the leaven. 

Christmas this year should be all 
that Christmas can be to us, it should 
oe our best Christmas. All that in 
former years has added to its joy 
should be done over again and some 
new pleasures added so as to make 
lis over-run with joy and enthusi- 
asm. Our very presence should be a 
tonic to the despairing one, and our 
icneer filled cheerful salute should 
■countermand all pessimistic and for- 
mal Christmas greetings. 

Now is our opportunity for now 
we have spirit, so let us give our 
college a good Christmas present. 
We can give much at this season 
with little cost so let us give what 
we can and all that we can. A good 
remark about Lebanon Valley, is a 
choice gift and one which is accept- 
able and well received. It will last 
while the college lasts and if we 
■speak kindly the college will always 
last for kind words never die. 

Let us each and every one present 



Mr. Hilary Gossard, of Greencastle, 
father of President G. D. Gossard, 
died Monday morning at 8.10 
o'clock. Mr. Gossard was failing for 
some weeks and several times the 
children were called to his bed-side. 
The faculty, students, and friends of 
the college all offer their sincerest 
sympathy to Dr. Gossard and his fam- 
ily in this bereavement, and trust 
that their sympathy may to some ex- 
tent assuage the anguish of their 
great sorrow. 



RECEPTION TO 

FOOT BALL TEAM 



Continued from page i 



a scrub was called. The Scrub Quar- 
tette punted out of sight and the 
crowd was carried off with the ball 
to the heavenly avenues of bliss. 

Unfortunately, the tenor of this 
last four hurt his voice on his last 
note and Dr. Brunner, of Lebanon, 
was called on for assistance. While 
waiting for remedies to take effect he 
gave an interesting review of foot- 
ball in days gone by. 

Seeing that he was being outdone, 
in oratory Manager Snavely took the 
floor and gave the auditors a most 
elaborate address, which although 
long drawn out and filled with 
"vocabularic" impossibilities, may be 
summed up in as follows: "Pass out 
the Wrigley's." The ladies after the 
manager's explosion, knowing that 
the team needed reviving, gave a 
cheer for them. This put spirit in 
the eleven and they held their own 
till the half ended. 
Third Quarter — 

Immediately after L. V. received 
the ball in third quarter, Capt. 
Strickler made one of his famous 
wide end runs which, after a gain of 
oh, say 150 yards, netted a touch- 
down. The crowd went wild until 
the time for the kicking of the goal, 
and all was again quiet. In kicking 
the goal Statton missed calculations 
entirely and the coveted point was 
not gained. The angry mob rushed 
upon the field and it was with dif- 
ficulty that the unfortunate player 
was rescued. 

Again there was scrimmage, and a 
scrub, in the person of Carl Schmidt, 
forgetting his surrounding, began to 
bewail loudly his fate. This wail 
was heard with sympathy, but soon 
the game went on. O. T. Ehrhardt, 
'10, here rushed on with water and 
dampened the whole proceedings till 
time was called at the end of the 
quarter. 

Fourth Quarter — 

This quarter was given off to the 
spirit of the season and yuletide was 
celebrated in its truest sense, the 
Athletic Association impersonating 
Santa Claus. 

The referee, Coach Guyer, here 
called the game and began speaking. 
He called each varsity man, who had 
won his letters, and presented him, 
after a few unnecessary yet explana- 
tory remarks as to the player's char- 
acter, etc., with a certificate giving 



the right to wear the college em- 
blem, the "L." He next presented 
each man with a coat sweater, of the 
highest grade. This finished the 
game pleasantly and time drew near 
for departing. 

The Varsity Quartette now made a 
last effort, and redeemed themselves 
to some extent by singing pathetical- 
ly, "Goodnight, My Love." 

The program might prove Interest- 
ing as it was tabulated: 
THE GAME. 

First Quarter — 

Kick Off — Varsity Quartette. 

First Down — Announcer . 

Penalized — Umpire. 

Forward Pass — Varsity Flutist. 

Second Quarter — 

Fumble — Head Linesman. 

Punt — Scrub Quartette. 

Time Out — Rubber. 

Chewing Gum — Manager. 

Cheer for the Team — Ladies' Quar- 
tette. 

Third Quarter — 

Wide End Run — Captain. 

Drop Kick — Varsity Violinist. 

Scrimmage — A Scrub. 

Water — Water Boy. 

Fourth Quarter — 

The Line-up — The "L" men. 

Explanation of Rules — Referee. 

Touchdown — -Varsity Quartette. 
LETTER MEN 

Paul Strickler, Joel Wheelock, Thos- 
Pell, Joseph Donahue, LeRoy Mackert> 
Carl Snavely, Marcel VonBereghyt 
George DeHuff, Joseph Hollinger< 
Russel Snavely, Samuel Mickey, Philo 
Statton and John Lerew. 



BASKET BALL 



Continued from page i 



Valley and the following schedule is 
sure to be a success: 

Wednesday, Dec. 17, Lebanon Y. 
M. C. A., here. 

Tuesday, Jan. 6, Swarthmore at 
Swarthmore. 

Wednesday, Jan. 7, Lehigh at 
South Bethlehem. 

Wednesday, Jan. 14, Susquehanna 
at Selinsgrove. 

Wednesday, Jan. 21, open. 

Friday, Jan. 23, Juniata at Hunt- 
ingdon. 

Wednesday, Jan. 28, Lafayette, 
here. 

Tuesday, Feb. 3, Mt. St. Marys, at 
Emmitsburg. 

Wednesday, Feb. 4, York All-Col- 
legiate at York. 

Tuesday, Feb. 10, Juniata, here. 

Wednesday, Feb. 11, Pennsylvania 
Military College at Chester. 

Thursday, Feb. 19, Susquehanna, 
here. 

Wednesday, Feb. 25, Lafayette at 
Easton. 

Thursday, Feb. 26, Muhlenberg at 
Allentown. 

Wednesday, March 4, open. 

Thursday, March 12, Muhlenberg, 
here. 



Y. M. C. A. 

At the Y. M. C. A. meeting on 
Sunday "Attributes which Make 
Character" was under discussion. 
The leader Mr. S. Huber Heintzel- 
man read a very carefully prepared 
paper on "Character" and then ask- 
ed the members present to speak on 
different attributes that make char- 
acter. The meeting was very inter- 
esting and many points worthy of 
our consideration were suggested. 



COLLEGE NEWS 




Just a Hint or Two 

A KODAK- 

Just the thing. Best because the gift itself provides the 
means of keeping a picture story of home and school 
days. 

A fountain Pen 

PARKER LUCKY CURVE 

20 VARIETIES AND PRICES. A GIFT THAT IS SERVICE- 
ABLE AND APPRECIATED. 

Fancy Box Paper ^ Gift Books 
Bibles and Testaments 
Cards and Booklets 
Diaries ftg 

Don't Forget the FELT and LEATHER PENNANTS and 
CUSHIONS AND THE SEAL JEWELRY. 




Calendars 
College Seal 
Stationery 



HARNISH & SMITH 

THE COLLEGE BOOK STORE 

HAPPY NEW YEAR 



Patronize the 



THE GIRLS IN THE GYMNASIUM. 

At last the girls of Lebanon Val- 
ley have been given their rights, for 
they are now permitted to partici- 
pate in athletics. Heretofore they 
were obliged to pay an athletic fee 
equal to that paid by the boys, and 
the only benefit they received from 
it was the privilege of witnessing the 
football and baseball games. They 
had very little opportunity even for 
tennis, for there was only one court 
and that was usually occupied by the 
hoys. 

Now things are different. There 
are three tennis courts, one of which 
is for women only, and the girls are 
to have the use of- the new gymna- 
sium, in fact they have already be- 
gun to use it. During the past week 
they have been playing basket- 



day. If they show as much enthu- 
siasm in the regular gymnasium 
work as they have shown in playing 
basketball, and I believe they will, 
those who are responsible for a gym- 
nasium at Lebanon Valley may feel 
that they have been repaid a hun- 
dred fold. 



CALENDAR 

Tuesday, 6 p. m. Prayer Meeting. 

Wednesday, 11 a. m. Athletic 
Meeting; 7 p. m. Mathematical 
Round Table; 8.30 p. m. Basket Ball 
Game, L. V. vs. Lebanon Y. M. C. A. 

Friday, 4 p. m., School Closes. 



ball 



every day. Their gymnasium 



suits have not yet arrived, but that 
did not hinder them, for the only 
requirement was tennis shoes. If a 
gIr l did not have a pair she bor- 
rowed them and went out to prac- 
ice. One evening there were more 
than twenty girls out prepared to 
Way. The girls enjoy the game so 
m uch that the chief subject of con- 
Versa tion is now basketball. In their 
| e uthusiasm they do not allow bruises 
;° r stiff limbs to stop them, but brave- 



Remember the Star Course num- 
ber January 6, 1914. 

RAH! RAH! BOYS EAT 

Raw Oysters at "Ussy's" 

OR EAT EM STEWED OR FRIED JUST AS 
YOU PREFER 



A. S. MILLER 



W. MAIN ST. 



Journal Publishing Co. 

Printers 



Academy Tailor 

DAVID B. BASHOt}E 



Clothing Called for 
and Returned 



Academy Bldg 
Room 18 



D. B. SHIFFER 
GRADUATE OPTICIAN 

Eyes Examined, Glasses Fitted, Broken 
Lenses Replaced, anything in 
the Optical line 

East Main St ANNVILLE 



You get only the best at 

COLLAM'S 

Quantity ✓ ✓ ✓ Quality 
Main Street 




FOOTBALL 

BASKETBALL 

BASEBALL 

HOCKEY 

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EQUIPMENT 



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in 



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rendered 
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easier 



A. G. Spaulding & Bros, are outfitters to 
champions, whose implements must be 
invariably right. Quality Counts. 

Spalding's Catalogue is now 
ready — free for the asking 

A. G, SPALDING & BROS, 

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M.F.BatdorfsSon 

Ladies' and Gents' 
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JOS. MILLER 

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and UNDERTAKING 



West Main Street 



Annville, Pa 



JACOB SdRGENT 



MERCHANT 
TAILOR 

READY-TO-WEAR CLOTHING 
Main Street Annville 

D. L. SAYLOR & SONS 

CONTRACTORS and BUILDERS 

Dealers in 
LUMBER and COAL - ANNVILLE, PA. 



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So out for practice again the next Main Street 



Annville, Pa. Send for a Catalogue 



Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 

% SCHOOL of VV 
'4% ENGINEERING 

CIVIL MECHANICAL, ELECTRICAL and CHEMICAL 
ENGINEERING, and GENERAL SCIENCE^ 

TROY, IM.Y - 



COLLEGE NEWS 



GO TO IT BOYS MISS SCHMIDT 

ENTERTAINS 



ITS 



Russ Brothers 
Velvet Ice Cream 



AT 



"USSY'S" 



A. S. MILLER. W. Maid St. 

jCebanon 1/alley 
College 

First Class Faculty. 
Group System. 

Special Facilities in Chemistry 

and Biology 
Music, Art, Oratory 

Ladies in the Hall are under the con- 
stant care of the Preceptress. 

Write for catalogue 

&ev. S. 2? Sossard, President 
jinnville, SPa. 

Get Your Shoes Repaired at 
GIANDONATO'S SHOP 

EAST MAIN STREET 

Shop Work done while you wait. 
Satisfaction guaranteed Prices right 



WINDSOR HOTEL 

W. T. BRUBAKER, Manager. 
European, $1-00 per day and up 
American, $2-50 per day and up 



On Tuesday afternoon of last 
week at 4.00 o'clock, Miss Schmidt 
entertained her voice students at 
what might be termed "An Hour 
With the Vocal Composers" in Prof. 
Sheldon's studio in the Conservatory 
of Music. It was largely attended 
and each one present sang a selec- 
tion.. The purpose of the gathering 
was to create an interest among the 
members of the class, as well as to 
become better acquainted with the 
style of composition of the different 
composers as brought out by the 
manner in which the students ren- 
dered their selections. All present 
reported having spent a very pleas- 
ant and instructive hour. 

Messrs. Faber E. Stengle, Earl 
Eichelberger, L. Clarence Barnet and 
Harry Bender, students of the Con- 
servatory of Music, gave a concert in 
the First United Brethren Church of 
Oberlin, Friday evening, December 
5. They were assisted by Mr. John 
Whitman, of Middletown, the young 
violinist who some time ago favored 
the college students with a fine solo 
in chapel, and Mr. Verling Jamison, 
reader. The program consisted of 
two piano pieces, piano solos, vocal 
solos, a vocal duet, violin numbers 
and readings. The concert proved a 
success in every respect. 

ATHLETIC ELECTION. 

The regular December Athletic 
election was held last Wednesday at 
which time the following officers, 
managers and assistant managers 
were elected: 

President, Paul Bowman. 

Secretary, David Evans. 

Football Manager, A. L. Weaver. 

Assistant Football Manager, Rob- 
ert Hartz. 

Track Manager, John Lerew. 

Assistant Track Manager, Wil- 
liam Mickey. 

Tennis Manager, Harry Bender. 

Assistant Tennis Manager, S. 
Huber Heintzelman. 




Midway between Broad Street 
Station and Reading Terminal 
on Filbert Street. 

The only moderate priced hotel of 
reputation and consequence in 

PHILADELPHIA 



The Bizarre photographer was 
here on Wednesday and took several 
group pictures of different school or- 
ganizations. 



You are correct If you get your 

LADIES' and GENTS' 
FURNISHINGS 

At KINPORTS', Annville, Pa. 

Students' Discount Packard & Radcliffe Shoes 

W. D. ELLIOTT 

Shoemaker 

Repairing neately done. Rubber work a 
specialty, 

Patronage Solicited 
Railroad St. Annville, Pa. 

EAGLE HOTEL 
LIVERY 

Teaming and Hauling of all 
I^inds. We JVIake a Speciality 

of Buss Parties 
First Class Teams to fiive at 
Reasonable Hates 

Anm/ille, Pa. 

WM. WALTZ 
Hair Cutting and Shaving 



ALUMNI NOTES. 

Prof. E. M. Balsbaugh, '01, princi- 
pal of Lebanon High School; Prof. 
J. W. Espenshade, '04, of Lebanon 
High School; Dr. M. W. Brunner, 
'01, of Lebanon; Rev. Daugherty, '89, 
of Trinity U. B., Lebanon, and Rev. 
O. T. Erhart, '11, of Hebron, were 
in the audience at the football re- 
ception on Friday night. 

Mr. S. O. Goho, '80, of Harrisburg, 
was elected president of the Sand- 
lime Brick Association at its tenth 
annual session last week. 

Earl Carmany, '12, spent the week 
end visiting friends at school. 

Prof. H. Clay Deaner, '79, of Ann- 
ville, is spending the week in the 
Maryland region, hunting for bear 
and other large game. 

Mr. Henry Wilder, '08, of Leba- 
non, superintendent of the state road 
construction in Lebanon county, at- 
tended a "good road" convention in 
Philadelphia last week. 

Mr. John R. Geyer, '98, of Harris- 
burg, delivered the Memorial address 
last Sunday at the Elks' Home in 
Lebanon. 



Saloon 



W. Main St. 



Annville, Pa 



For Cakes and Confectionery 

GO TO 

Bowman's Bakery 

A FULL SUPPLY OF HALL'S CHOCO* 
LATES. ALWAYS FRESH 

W, Main St. Annville, Pa. 



Home-Made Noodles, Peanut Butter 

H. B. FLOWERS 

Manufacturer of 

''Flower Brand" Potato 
Chips 

LEBANON, PA. 



Photograph* 



Duplicate Photo- 
graphs can be had 
from the negatives 
made at Lebanon 
Valley College. 

Place orders with 
Mr. A. L. Weaver. 

Special Price© giv- 
en students having 
Photographs made at 
our Studio. 



DIVES, POMEROY 
& STEWART 

READING, PA,